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2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 231 words || 
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1. Pitts, Kristin. and Henry, Kandace. "Sociological Learning to Action: Using Social Action Projects to Promote Community Engagement beyond the Classroom" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1379844_index.html>
Publication Type: Informal Discussion Roundtable
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This discussion will involve how the presenters implemented a sociology term social action project and evaluated the efficacy of the educational intervention. Recent news highlights have shown a plethora of social movements and social action issues across the world, but most seem to fade out before issues are addressed and resolved. The presenters of this workshop saw an opportunity in the classroom to engage students in a way that would help promote social action beyond academia. The presenters implemented a social action term project to address the issue of human trafficking in the local area. The project involved five sociology classes at two colleges and focused on teaching the students about the impact they can create within their community. Presenters divided groups into four engagement platforms: social media, community event, traditional media, and legislative. Students worked in small groups to design a social action campaign for their assigned platform and then carried out the campaign on their college campuses and in the local community. An evaluation was done to determine the impact students made in their community. There were three objectives of the social action term project: illustrate how a small group can create a big impact in the world; give students an opportunity to learn how to leverage scarce resources to accomplish a task; and ultimately to promote future social advocacy among students.
Supporting Publications:
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2006 - XVth Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies Words: 323 words || 
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2. Weidema, Maaike., Biro, Szilvia., Eenshuistra, Rena., Elsner, Birgit. and Hommel, Bernhard. "Action-effect learning and action control in infants" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the XVth Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies, Westin Miyako, Kyoto, Japan, Jun 19, 2006 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p94020_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Abstract: To perform a goal-directed action, one needs to have some knowledge about the (possible) consequences of this action. According to the two-stage model of action control (Elsner & Hommel, 2001), voluntary action is anticipatory and, hence, must depend on associations between actions and their perceivable effects. In this model, action control is attributed to the automatic association of movements and their sensory effects. This association is assumed to be bi-directional and therefore, an action can be activated by presenting or anticipating its effect. Support for the two-stage model of action control was found in several adult studies (for a review, see Hommel, 2005) and recently also in a developmental study with 4- and 7-years-old children (Eenshuistra et al., 2004). It is well established that response-effect contingencies are acquired from the first months of life (e.g. Rovee & Rovee, 1969), however the use of action-effect associations has, until recently, not been investigated in infants.
In the current study the acquisition and use of action-effect associations was examined in 12-months-old infants. The task existed of two phases, a learning phase and a test phase. In the learning phase, infants were encouraged to press a touch-sensitive key that led to an auditory effect. In this way, an association between an action and an accompanying (sound) effect was learned. In a subsequent test phase, the use of this action-effect association was examined in three conditions, in which (a) the previously associated tone, (b) a non-associated tone or (c) no tone was presented as a stimulus. The frequency and latency of key presses following the stimulus were recorded. We assumed that perceiving a previously associated action-effect primes the associated action, and therefore would increase the likelihood of performing that response. We expected that infants would execute more and faster key-pressing actions following a tone that has previously been associated with an action, compared to non-associated tone or to spontaneous behavior. The preliminary results support these predictions.

2008 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 249 words || 
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3. Basurto, Amando. "Thinking and Action. Explorations on the relation between Thinking and Action in Hannah Arendt" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA, Nov 13, 2008 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p276762_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: My paper shows a distinctive approach to analyze the relation between the categories of thinking and action within Hannah Arendt theoretical design. Throughout her oeuvre, Arendt designed a conceptual architecture in the form of two columns: the vita activa and the life of the mind. The first column has the objective of reconstructing the category of action as the most valuable human activity. The second column was developed in a more gradual manner, which led Arendt towards a long process of not only understanding thinking and its consequences for morality but also to develop a non-hierarchical structure containing the three basic mental activities: thinking, willing and judging. In Arendt’s blueprints, judgment was designed to be the convergence point of the structure, between the life of the mind and political action, while the category of thinking remained negative or, at the most, tangential to action –particularly in reference to political action.
I propose analyzing three elements that she takes for granted in her conceptualization of action that cannot be fully understood unless they are related to thinking: uniqueness, forgiveness and promise and new beginnings. For, as I explain, thinking is: a) directly related to speech and identity distinctness, b) the faculty through which men are able to stand between past and future, which is fundamental for the actualization of forgiveness and promises, and c) the rebellious mental activity that allows men to question and transcend habits, doctrines and rules, which is necessary for the actualization of “new beginnings” and political (re)foundations.

2011 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 43 pages || Words: 9815 words || 
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4. Pilny, Andy. and Atouba, Yannick. "Organizing for collective action: Understanding the structure of collective action among self-benefitting NGOs in the national labor policy domain." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 05, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p455729_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Self-benefitting NGOs primarily exist to serve their own members. Nevertheless, these NGOs still form coalitions and network with one another to gain access to critical resources, shape public opinion, and lobby on behalf of their members. However, the networking patterns among these organizations have not received much attention in the organizational literature. Moreover, while the organizational literature is rich in information about why organizations form ties, it is less rich in information about why they form those ties the way they do. This study seeks to fill those gaps in the literature. It uses a multi-theoretical, multi-level framework and Exponential Random Graph Modeling to examine the endogenous and exogenous influences on the structure of a communication network among 56 self-benefitting NGOs. The results indicate that endogenous mechanisms like centralization and transitivity, and exogenous attributes like subdomain influence, organizational type, media attention, and age influence the probability of communication ties being present. However, the principle of reciprocity did not influence communication ties, suggesting that the inherent self-interested nature of self-benefitting NGOs may impact the logic of their interorganizational networks. Furthermore, media attention was highly correlated with perception of organizational influence. Implications for future research are drawn from the results.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Words: 336 words || 
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5. Raymond, Geoffrey. and Royce, Tracy. "Self, Formulating Actions: Some Notes on the Recognizability and Intelligibility of Actions-in-Interaction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p424504_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper considers occasions in which speakers use declaratively formed utterances to formulate what they are doing, were doing, or were planning to do; these include formulations that (ostensibly) describe mental states (such as “thinking” and “wondering”), actions that are (or could be/could have been) accomplished via talk (e.g., “asking”, “telling”) and actions produced through other forms of embodied conduct (including such observable actions as turning down the fan, taking food, etc.) Since participants mostly treat actions (and emotions) as recognizable and intelligible to any competent member (cf. Garfinkel, 1967; Heritage, 1984), on what bases do speakers presume to tell others about matters that are, or should be, obvious? We address this question in three ways. First, we note what speakers formulate, and what such utterances makes relevant for specific recipients in their sequential context. Second, by considering various temporal relationships between the formulation and the action (or state) it describes (including whether the formulation precedes or projects action, explicates its ongoing production or relevance, or retrospectively comments on it or the occasion in which it might have been produced), we show that self formulated actions are part of a set of practices participants can use to manage the sequentially – and thus socially-- situated character of any current action-in-interaction. Third, by focusing on the sequential positioning of such self-formulations (e.g., in sequence initiating position, in responses, and/or by reference to the overall structural organization of an interaction) we explicate how participants treat the patrol and defense of various rights associated with managing self-other relations as practically implicated in a broad range of action types (see Goffman, 1971; Brown and Levinson, 1987; Heritage and Raymond, 2005). We conclude by comparing this set of practices with instances in which participants formulate who they are as a basis for addressing connections between (1) the various forms of social organization that routinely shapes who talks with whom (cf. Levinson, 2005), (2) the presumed recognizability and intelligibility of actions-in-interaction that such processes routinely enable, and (3) issues of action formation.

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