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2007 - International Society of Political Psychology Pages: 36 pages || Words: 1164 words || 
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1. Adelman, Janice. and Omoto, Allen. "Does Religion Matter in Political Action? An Examination of Religious Predictors of Political Action in Europe and the US" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Classical Chinese Garden, Portland, Oregon USA, Jul 04, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p204612_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Prior research intimates that religion may prompt some political behaviors. The current study examined political action in two different datasets of older adults between the ages of 54 and 94. Measures of religiousness and religious denomination were used to predict a multiple item measure of current political activity in a sample of 15,149 participants of different religious denominations from twenty­two European countries and the United States. Parallel analyses were conducted in a smaller dataset of 189 (mostly Protestant) participants from California assessing lifetime political activity. Regression analyses suggest that across both datasets, religious denomination moderates the influence of religiousness on political action. In reporting current political action, religious Protestants reported the greatest amount of political action, while religious Jews and Other Christians reported the least. Moreover, only Protestants reported more political activity as religiousness increased. In reporting lifetime political action, religious individuals with No Affiliation reported the greatest amount of political activity, followed by Other Christians and Protestants, while religious Roman Catholics reported the least. Implications are discussed for future research highlighting the intersection of politics and religion.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Words: 99 words || 
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2. Miranda, Kristine. "All Talk and No Action: A Problematization of the Application of Habermasian Communicative Action theory to International Politics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p253959_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Does arguing matter in the practice of International Politics? This paper examines the application of Habermas' communicative action (CA) to international politics in three different ways. First, it examines the normative foundations that underlie the norm transformation CA is suppose to illicit. Second, it examines the plausability of what Thomas Risse calls the "metatheoretical assumptions" that CA theorists must make in order to apply CA to international politics. Third, it problematizes the mechanism of CA itself by arguing that most political decisions in international politics are value incommensurable, making rationality incapable of changing agent's "minds" when making political decisions.

2009 - ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE" Words: 34 words || 
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3. Gibson, Shannon. "Transnational Social Movements, Framing and Direct Action Strategies: The Climate Action Network from Bali to Copenhagen" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE", New York Marriott Marquis, NEW YORK CITY, NY, USA, Feb 15, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p312469_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper seeks to analyze the changing repertoires and strategies employed by transnational environmental social movement organizations (TESMOs) to engage and communicate with actors and segments within what Thomas Olesen has termed 'transnational publ

2009 - ISPP 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting Words: 255 words || 
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4. Schneider, Simone. and Castillo, Juan. "Social Justice and Political Action – The influence of attribution patterns on political action in comparative perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, Jul 14, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p314599_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The attribution of poverty is strongly related to perceptions of social justice. If people attribute the existence of poverty to internal factors (e.g. lack of ability or talent) over external ones (e.g. failure of the economic system), it is assumed that poverty is a legitimate and fair result of the distributive process. In contrast, prevailing external attribution patterns express social discontent with the distributive system, and are therefore expected to lead to different forms of political action.

Our research question is twofold: (1) Does the degree of legitimacy differ between societies? (2) To what extent do different attribution patterns affect political action?

In this paper we argue that people in different societies share the conviction that poverty is highly due to internal factors. Despite this overall legitimating consensus, external attributions are expected to vary according to the economic situation of the society, generating different forms of political action.

The empirical analysis of attribution patterns and political action within different societies is scarce, principally due to the absence of comparative data. The International Social Justice Project (ISJP) is one of the few comparative research projects that incorporate topics such as poverty attributions. Using data from 2006, four democratic countries presenting different economic and cultural contexts – Germany, Czech Republic, Israel and Chile – are compared regarding the legitimacy of income inequalities. First, we test the existence of internal and external attribution patterns with multiple group confirmatory factor analysis. Second, we analyze the influence of poverty attribution patterns on different types of political behaviour.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 1048 words || 
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5. Eckley, Elizabeth. "Empathy in Action: A Practitioner's Reflections on a Community Action Poverty Simulation (CAPS)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p724702_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In our current economic climate, there are a significant number of families in the United States that are experiencing exhaustive economic distress. In an effort to increase empathy for those in poverty, human service agencies have been utilizing the Community Action Poverty Simulation (CAPS) with their staff and community leaders. During the CAPS experience, participants role-play the daily lives of low-income families, including single parents who are responsible for care of their children, senior citizens who are trying to remain self-sufficient on Social Security, and two parent households who are just trying to make ends meet. On behalf of the Centre County Council for Human Services and Central Pennsylvania Community Action, a retrospective pre-post survey and focus group were implemented to measure CAPS participant changes in attitudes and knowledge regarding poverty. Approximately half of the CAPS participants, thirty-three in total, were sampled. Findings suggest a significant change in the attitudes regarding welfare patrons, welfare satisfaction, and poverty-related knowledge.

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