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2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Words: 153 words || 
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1. Marker, Caroline., Gnambs, Timo. and Appel, Markus. "Active on Facebook and Failing at School? Meta-Analytic Findings on the Relationship Between Online Social Networking Activities and Academic Achievement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, <Not Available>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1363422_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: The popularity of social networking sites (SNSs) among adolescents and young adults has raised concerns that the intensity of using these platforms might be associated with lower academic achievement. The empirical findings on this issue, however, are all but conclusive. Therefore, we present four random-effects meta-analyses including 59 independent samples (total N = 29,337) on the association between patterns of SNS use and grades. The meta-analyses identified small negative effects of = -.07, 95%CI [-.12, -.02] for general SNS use and = -.10, 95%CI [-.16, -.05] for SNS use related to multitasking. General SNS use was unrelated to the time spent studying for school ( = -.03, 95%CI [-0.11, 0.06]) and no support for the time displacement hypothesis could be found in a meta-analytical mediation analysis. SNS use for academic purposes exhibited a small positive association, = .08, 95%CI [.02, .14]. Hypotheses with regard to cross-cultural differences were not supported.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 6542 words || 
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2. Pittaoulis, Melissa. "Nursing Home Activities: An Exploration of the Limitations of Activity Theory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p110506_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Activity theory has served as a theoretical basis for many aging programs. However, researchers focused on activity theory tend to ignore important flaws in its conceptualization. Participant observation was conducted during activities at a nursing home in order to study the application of activity theory. Of particular interest were resident involvement, staff participation, and resident interaction during activities. Observations revealed that activities may not be as beneficial to residents as activity theory suggests. Residents’ actual participation in activities is minimal. Treatment of residents by staff members was often dehumanizing. Residents rarely interacted with each other. Furthermore, when residents did interact, there were arguments and discourtesy. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

2007 - NCA 93rd Annual Convention Pages: 38 pages || Words: 9676 words || 
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3. Godlewski, Lisa. and Perse, Elizabeth. "Audience Activity and Reality Television: Identification, Online Activity, and Satisfaction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 93rd Annual Convention, TBA, Chicago, IL, Nov 15, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p191730_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study was an examination of types of audience activity within the viewers of reality television programs. This genre was chosen because the programs’ focus on real people engaged in contents, competitions, and relationships encourages identification. The program producers and fans use of the Web for extra video footage, photos, program summaries and speculations, online discussion, and voting encourages online activity after exposure. The study’s hypotheses predicted that audience viewing motives will be significant predictors of identification, online post-exposure activity, and satisfaction. Data were collected from a sample of 464 college student and adult reality program viewers. In general, the study’s hypotheses were supported. Identification was predicted by Social Learning viewing motive and cognitive and emotional involvement while watching the programs. Engaging in online activity after watching was predicted by elaboration and feeling negative emotion while watching the programs. Satisfaction with watching reality programs was predicted by viewing motives, cognitive and emotional involvement, and, surprisingly, less online activity after watching. The theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7129 words || 
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4. Winston, Fletcher. "Activating Activism in the Classroom: Undergraduate Experiences and Enduring Political Engagement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p722857_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research demonstrates the importance of college to political participation after graduation, but few studies examine specific campus experiences to determine their effect on different forms of political activism. This paper addresses the gap in our understanding of political engagement by analyzing the results of an alumni survey distributed to all College of Liberal graduates at a southeastern university. Chi-square tests determine whether there is a statistically significant relationship between five curricular and co-curricular undergraduate experiences and ten types of political engagement after graduating. Analysis of the 50 contingency tables produced demonstrates that organizational involvement, campus leadership, and volunteering reflect limited influence, while service-learning has the greatest impact on long term political participation. This course-based service experience has a significant effect on behaviors such as voting and donating money to political candidates as well as more explicit forms of social movement activism such as membership in SMOs and protest participation. Interestingly, classes with merely a service add-on show no association with any of the political behaviors under examination. This suggests the importance of the reflection required of service-learning and how critical engagement with community service heightens awareness, deepens knowledge, and facilitates the attitudinal and identity development that promote long term activism.

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