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2009 - The Law and Society Association Words: 241 words || 
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1. Childerhose, Janet. "State Actors as Social Movement Actors? Advocacy Efforts at the SACGHS Hearings to Persuade Congress to Pass GINA" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Grand Hyatt, Denver, Colorado, May 25, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-12-08 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p303423_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Social movement actors are generally depicted as non-state actors whose advocacy is directed at the state, or who have an adversarial relationship with state actors. The recent history of activism to pass federal nondiscrimination legislation is a case that challenges this understanding of social movement actors as non-state, non-elite actors. Since 1993, the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), the federal genome agency, has led advocacy efforts with the National Breast Cancer Coalition, genetic activists, legal scholars, and industry, to persuade Congress to pass federal nondiscrimination legislation. Their lobbying and education efforts succeeded in May 2008, when President George W. Bush signed the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) into law, banning health insurers and employers from using genetic information in their decision-making. One of the sites at which this coalition of federal scientists and genetic activists made their case that the nation needed a federal law banning genetic discrimination was the public hearings of a federal advisory committee, the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health and Society (SACGHS), from 2003 to 2005. At the SACGHS hearings, the Committee adopted the role of advocate for GINA. It worked to legitimize genetic discrimination as a significant policy problem for the nation’s health, and a civil rights problem affecting all Americans. In this talk, I describe how a federal advisory committee became an advocate of GINA in its own proceedings and produced lobbying tools (and what sort) for genetic discrimination activists.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 25 pages || Words: 9587 words || 
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2. Schrodt, Phillip. and Yilmaz, Omur. "Coding Sub-State Actors using the CAMEO (Conflict and Mediation Event Observations) Actor Coding Framework" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-08 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p253279_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Event data were originally developed in the 1960s to code interstate actors, although even the early system such as WEIS and COPDAB included a small number of non-state actors such as the UN, IRA, and PLO. With the decline of interstate conflict and the increase in the importance of a variety of non-state and sub-state actors in global behavior, there is increasing interest in applying event data coding methods to the analysis of the activities of these actors. Because almost all contemporary conflicts transcend the traditional focus on state actors, featuring instead significant involvement of both sub-state and non-state actors, the state-centered coding schemes used in older data sets such as WEIS and COPDAB have proven inadequate for coding current events. In their place, we have established a systematic method of hierarchically creating codes that allow for the identification of states, sub-state actors, ethnic groups, geographical regions, IGOs and NGOs. This system has proven sufficient to code a wide range of relevant actors involved in inter- and intra-state protracted conflicts in Africa, the Balkans, Central Asia and the Middle East.
Supporting Publications:
Supporting Document

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Pages: 35 pages || Words: 9311 words || 
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3. Bloomfield, Michael. "Leaders, laggards, and followers: How does variation amongst business actors affect the regulatory capacity of nonstate actors?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-08 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p500166_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Private actors are creating global governance through their interactions and this has raised concerns about the possibility and implications of a movement from public to private authority in the international sphere. If there is such a movement from public to private authority in the global economy, reflected by the creation of nonstate environmental governance arrangements through the interaction between firms and NGOs, it is paramount to ask what such nonstate institutions can hope to achieve. This essay will investigate how variation amongst business, even within the same sector, affects the governance arrangements that emerge. This facilitates a preliminary evaluation of what the regulatory capacities of nonstate actors are in the seeming absence of direct state participation. Findings from a firm-level analysis of the US jewellery industry, as the targeted node of the global gold supply chain, are presented to evaluate the argument and investigate the multidimensional role of business in global governance.

2012 - Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Council for European Studies Words: 258 words || 
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4. Kerremans, Bart. "Who is the Real Actor in the EU’s International Actorness?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Council for European Studies, Omni Parker House Hotel, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2019-12-08 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p548353_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper raises the question who the real actor is in the EU’s international actorness in the WTO. We try to answer this question with an eye for the paradigmatic fight that exists among several EU players – the Commission, the member state governments, and the member state parliaments – with regard to trade. In this fight, different players use different tools to weigh on the outcome. The hypothesis is here that based on the notion “where you stand depends on where you sit”, each player’s preference on trade is affected to a large extent by the position that he/she occupies in the delegation chain that characterizes internal EU decision-making on trade. The paper tests this hypothesis through a discourse analysis of parliamentary debates on the ongoing WTO Doha Development Agenda (DDA) in six EU member states (Italy, France, Germany, Austria, Spain, and the Netherlands) with attention for the different positions taken by members of the majority, members of the opposition, and government representatives on the one hand, and a comparison of these discourses with the positions that the Commission has been taking in the DDA negotiations on the other hand. The possible impact of differences among member states (their defensive and offensive interests, their traditional position on trade) will be accounted for. The expectation is that as players are located further from the European Commission in the delegation chain, their position will be more strongly focused on defensive interests, and that for players more closely located to the Commission, offensive interests and Schumpeterian arguments will matter more.

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