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2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 6674 words || 
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1. Schrader, Valerie. "Teachable Moments in Presidential Eulogies: A Rhetorical Analysis of Ronald Reagan’s Address to the Nation on the Challenger Disaster and William Jefferson Clinton’s Oklahoma City Bombing Memorial Prayer Service Address" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2018-09-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p329574_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines teachable moments in two American presidential eulogistic addresses: Ronald Reagan’s Address to the Nation on the Challenger Disaster and Bill Clinton’s Oklahoma City Bombing Memorial Prayer Service Address. Through generic criticism, I argue that presidents use teachable moments to meet the requirements set forth by the speech genre, to create a “rhetorical hybrid” (Campbell & Jamieson, 1982), to incorporate a future theme in the eulogy, and to establish identification with their audiences.

2016 - ASHE Annual Conference: Higher Education and the Public Good Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Katz, Andrew. "Addressing the State of Higher Education in State of the Union Addresses: 1970-2016" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASHE Annual Conference: Higher Education and the Public Good, Hyatt Regency Columbus, Columbus, Ohio, Nov 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-09-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1159883_index.html>
Publication Type: Research Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over the past 46 years, the economic turmoil in the United States that beset the 1970s has altered the depiction and discussion of higher education in public discourse. To better understand some of these changes, this paper applies qualitative content analysis to State of the Union Addresses from 1970-2016.

2012 - 56th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 550 words || 
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3. Asino, Tutaleni., Stager, Sarah., Ntshalintshali, General. and Semali, Ladislaus. "Addresses or speeches: Analysis of CIES presidential addresses on the worldwide education revolution" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 56th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Apr 22, 2012 <Not Available>. 2018-09-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p551521_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Representing the ethos of the organization, a presidential address is, at best, a personalization of the collective mission, and at its worst, empty rhetoric. In the Comparative International Education Society (CIES), the presidential address has been both.12345 Some presidents use the pulpit to promote legitimate global issues concerning the education crisis while others prefer to take a grand tour of the educational terrain. While these positions are contested arena, whether an “address” or a “speech,” few presidents have ventured to take on the vesture of the “public sociologist”6 to unpack unjust social arrangements in the worldwide education revolution. According to the bylaws of the organization a presidential address is to be given at each Annual Meeting of the Society.7 Although a connection may be made, there is no requirement to link the presidential address with the mission of the organization, the annual meeting theme, or to any contemporary phenomenon concerning tension or trajectory of education. Consequently, the speeches have over the years varied in content and context.

Stemming from the maturation of education as an implicit currency, this paper examines the relevancy of CIES to the worldwide education revolution and how the addresses engage in the framing and constructing (new) discoursal visions of CIES as a leader in educational policy. How do the addresses influence life chances and trajectories in a particular material economy of textual and discursive relations?

Using critical content analysis and textual analysis methods, this paper analyzes the trajectory of the vision embedded in presidential addresses between 1956—2010 and examines the tensions that become manifest in the underlying debates about method, policy and field that reveal how individual presidents have attended to the worldwide education revolution. We identify multiple competing discursive constructions of education within and between societies as well as attempts to reshape new discourses of educational thinking that go beyond those of the popular ones. Presenters will outline preliminary results from the ongoing analysis. The findings are a mixed bag that includes particular contemporary practices in the field of education as well as explicit markers of where the focus of the organization need be directed. While some addresses have been more intentional at highlighting the need to extend knowledge of practice or policy, others have accomplished little beyond the rhetoric of educational politics.

1.Levin, H. M. (2009). “Presidential Address: My Comparative Education, 1970–1975.” Comparative Education Review Vol. 53, No. 3 (August 2009), pp. 315-327

2. Arnove, R. F (2001). "Comparative and International Education Society (CIES) Facing the Twenty-First Century: Challenges and Contributions. Presidential Address". Comparative Education Review, Vol. 45, No. 4, pp. 477-503

3. Theisen, G. (1997). “Presidential Address: The New ABCs of Comparative and International Education.” Comparative Education Review, Vol. 41, No. 4, pp. 397-412

4. Lindsay, B. (1989). “Presidential Address: Integrating International Education and Public Diplomacy: Creative Partnerships or Ingenious Propaganda?” Comparative Education Review, Vol. 33, No. 4, pp. 423-436

5. Foster, P. J. (1971). “Presidential Address: The Revolt against the Schools.” Comparative Education Review, Vol. 15, No. 3, pp. 267-275

6. Arena. J. (2010). The contested terrains of public sociology: Theoretical and practical lessons from the movement to defend public housing in pre- and post-Katrina New Orleans. Societies Without Boarders 5(2), 103-125.

7. The Constitution and bylaws of The Comparative and International Education Society available at http://cies.us/historian/CIES_Con_July2010.pdf

2014 - Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference Words: 427 words || 
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4. Bishop, J. and Erkaeva, Nigora. "Ex Ungue Leonem Redux: The social context of honorific addresses – The case of the CIES Presidential Addresses" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Mar 10, 2014 <Not Available>. 2018-09-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p717516_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In pursuit of observer-observed equity of being, this project seeks to eliminate the arrogation of an elevated status for the observer to the detriment of the observed. That is, our objects are subjects, as are we, as entitled as observers to experiencing the results of minimizing subject-object dualism and the privilege of the spectator that is the theoretical motivation for this study. Thus, in this paper, we examine the finite set of CIES Presidential Addresses in order to (1) elucidate a generic theory of the social genesis and context of cultural production equally applicable to the observer and the observed and (2) illustrate the theory through analysis of those speeches.

The Comparative and International Education Society is no exception to the assertion that all groups authorize (an) official(s) who are granted the right to speak for and as the organization. Such officials, by virtue of their office, are able to articulate a future trajectory for the organization, to comment on its past, in otherwords, to speak, as they please, as the organizational voice, often recognizing that they are not and have not been alone in that endeavor. For instance, one past CIES President noted in his Presidential Address that:

The usual purpose of presenting a presidential address to the Comparative and International Education Society is to provide a critical overview, a central preoccupation, or a profound scholarly dissection of some topic of interest to CIES members.... In contrast, I have chosen to reject an erudite discourse, instead basing my presidential address on a revelation of some events in my personal comparative education during my initiation into the field in my formative period... (Levin, 2009: 315)

We empirically examine a finite, but growing, set of materials in order to elucidate, illuminate, and specify the range and forms of generic characteristics of cultural production practices and characterize their temporal distribution across the set of materials known as the CIES annual Presidential Addresses. As an anticipatory set, we note that each of these presidents have talked about how Comparative Education (CE) can be improved and done so from different perspectives. Their foci have ranged from how CE can be improved and impact the policies that are being made about education throughout the world, the importance of multicultural education/inclusion of different ethnicities, the impact of ideologies on education, what can be done to improve CE as a field with numerous suggestions, the impact of globalization on education and the role of teachers and comparative researchers. The question we propose to preliminarily answer is: what distributional pattern exists in this data set.

2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 31 pages || Words: 6730 words || 
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5. Rocca, Michael. "Instant Messages: One-Minute Speeches and Special Orders Addresses in the House of Representatives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2018-09-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p65719_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract:     This paper examines members' of congress decision to deliver one-minute speeches and special orders addresses. These speeches are institutionally supportive forums for Mayhewian position taking behavior. Not only is unconstrained floor time available for any MC, the forums provide an opportunity to deliver messages directly to constituents via the television from House floor. Using count data from the 101st through 106th congresses, I argue that these forums are particularly popular among the institutionally disadvantaged and party leaders. Committee leaders do not participate in the activities because they already dominate general floor debate and committee hearings. The results indicate support for my theory for one-minute speeches only. I show that special orders generate a distinct distribution of legislators and therefore be treated separately.

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