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2007 - International Communication Association Words: 126 words || 
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1. Stevens, Robin. and Gabbadon, Nadine. "A Different World?: Television Viewing Among White and Black Adolescents and its Implications for Adolescent Sexual Development" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p172436_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Data have consistently shown that compared to White teenagers Black teenagers watch approximately two more hours of television per day. The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of this difference in television exposure. Although much audience research contends that Blacks and Whites are viewing very different television content, an analysis of data collected from a sample of Black (n=232) and White (n=225) adolescents this study shows that, while White teenagers watch mainly general interest programs, black teenagers are watching Black-targeted programs in addition to these general interest programs. The implications of these different viewing patterns for exposure to sexual content will be discussed. Analyses concerning cable access, television access in the bedroom, and channel viewing differences are also presented.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 12410 words || 
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2. Weitzman, Abigail. "The Second Adolescence: The Sex of Firstborn Adolescent Offspring and Fathers’ Sexual Behavior, Health, and Attitudes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p723769_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although parental effects on child wellbeing have been a common theme in social science literature, far less attention has been paid to children’s impact on parents’ health. In this study, I integrate theories of gender, socialization, and the life course to ask whether the sexual tendencies of fathers of firstborn adolescent sons are different from the sexual tendencies of fathers of firstborn adolescent daughters. To answer this question, I create a natural experiment observing the effect of the sex of firstborn offspring on fathers’ sexual behavior and health, drawing on data from thirty-six Demographic and Health Surveys collected throughout the developing world—where STD rates remain substantially higher than elsewhere. The results suggest that compared to fathers with firstborn adolescent daughters, fathers with firstborn adolescent sons are more likely to report recent sexual activity and paying for sex, while less likely to report using condoms. Furthermore, fathers of adolescent sons are more likely to report having genital warts. Additional analyses reveal that the effects of offspring sex on fathers’ sexual behavior and health are limited to the years in which a child is an adolescent and correspond with an effect of offspring sex on fathers’ attitudes toward women’s sexual autonomy.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Kao, Katie., Doan, Stacey. and Tarullo, Amanda. "Marital Quality and Parent-Adolescent Relationship Quality Mediate Links between Parental and Adolescent Psychopathology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p955251_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Adolescent psychopathology has been associated both with parental psychiatric symptoms (Burstein et al., 2010) and with marital relationship quality (Harold et al., 1997). Parent-child relationships have been found to be linked to later psychosocial functioning in adulthood (Raudino et al., 2012). However, indirect influences affecting these relationships have not been fully explored and findings may clarify pathways to better predict risk for psychopathology in adolescents. We investigated the impacts of maternal and paternal psychopathology on internalizing and externalizing problems in adolescents and the potential mediating roles of marital quality and parent-adolescent relationships.
The current study was a secondary analysis using data from families who participated in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care & Youth Development. In our sample (N=991,493 males,Mage=14.45 years), parents reported on their own psychopathology, adolescents’ behavioral problems, marital quality and the relationship with their adolescent; while adolescents reported on their own psychopathology and the relationship with their mother and father. Four mediation models were conducted using ordinary least squares path analysis (Hayes, 2013) examining the mediating roles of marital quality and parent-adolescent relationships separately for mothers and fathers and for adolescent internalizing and externalizing.
In the first model, Figure 1, (F(4, 725)=44.80,p=<.001), mothers with higher psychopathology had lower levels of marital quality (a1=-0.40) and lower levels of mother-adolescent relationship quality (a2=-0.35). There was an indirect effect of mother psychopathology on adolescent internalizing through marital quality and mother-adolescent relationship quality (a1d21b2=0.01,CI 0.003–0.02), indicating the more depressed or anxious the mother feels, the more likely her marital relationship is negatively affected which adversely impacts her own relationship with her adolescent. This can ultimately lead to poorer emotional and behavioral adolescent functioning. There was also an indirect effect of mother psychopathology on adolescent internalizing problems through mother-adolescent relationship quality (a2b2=0.12,CI 0.08–0.17), indicating that another possible mechanism in which mother psychopathology predicts adolescent internalizing problems is through the relationship between the mother and adolescent, independent of marital quality. The same pattern of results held when examining externalizing problems.
Next, subsequent models examining mediators in the association of father psychopathology to adolescent internalizing and externalizing adolescent symptoms yielded the same pattern of results (Figure 2 displays father psychopathology and adolescent externalizing). This indicates that the pathway through marital quality and parent-adolescent relationship quality helps explain the relationship between parents’ psychopathology and adolescent behavioral problems regardless of whether the psychopathology originates from the mother or father and also regardless of the type of behavioral problem outcome (internalizing vs. externalizing). Findings demonstrate the importance of considering multiple dyadic relationships and the interactions between familial dyads when examining predictors of internalizing and externalizing symptoms in adolescents. The current results have potential to help adolescents at risk for developing emotional and behavior problems. When either parent has a history of psychopathology, target prevention and intervention programs aimed to build more positive marital relationship quality as well as to improve the parent-adolescent relationship may help to foster healthy psychosocial functioning in youth.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Halgunseth, Linda., Noblega Mayorga, Magaly., Barrig, Patricia., Macavilca, Karen., Espinosa-Hernandez, Graciela. and Reid, Alexander. "Validation of the Mexican Parenting Questionnaire for Adolescents (MPQ-A) among Early-Adolescents in Peru" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p961838_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over the years, parenting researchers have examined Latino parenting using self-report measures based on observations of Euro-American families (Halgunseth, Ispa, & Rudy, 2006). Sociocultural and social information processing frameworks suggest that culture influences parenting beliefs, and hence behaviors (Crick & Dodge, 1994; Harkness, Super, & Keefer, 1992). Thus, there is a need for new parenting measures that are appropriate for use with Latino families. Recently, an adolescent self-report parenting measure, the Mexican Parenting Questionnaire for Adolescents (MPQ-A; Halgunseth, Espinosa-Hernandez, & Armenta, 2013) was developed to assess parenting in Mexican families. Initial evidence supports the validity of this measure for use with adolescents in Mexico (Halgunseth et al., 2013). However, it is unclear whether this measure is appropriate for use with early-adolescents from other Latino backgrounds. The goal of this study is to examine the validity of the MPQ-A in a sample of early adolescents in Peru.

The sample includes 308 early-adolescents (54.9% girls) from Lima, Perú, who range between 10 to 13 years of age (M = 11.25, SD = 0.99). Data were collected in middle school classrooms. All measures were in Spanish. Participants completed self-report measures of maternal parenting practices using the Mexican Parenting Questionnaire for Adolescents (MPQ-A; Halgunseth et al. 2013), which assesses two aspects of parental warmth (i.e., affection and guidance), three aspects of parental discipline (i.e., physical, verbal, and communication), and parental monitoring (see Table 1). Participants also reported on their mothers’ use of communication affect and critical rejection using the Parenting Style Subscales (PSS; Bersabé et al., 1999), as well as their use of physical, violent, and psychologically aggressive disciplinary practices using the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS; UNICEF, 2006).

Both exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were used to verify the factor structure of the MPQ-A. Results from CFA revealed that both the Warmth model (χ2 (4) = 7.98, p=.092; CFI = .986; RMSEA = .057; SRMR = .026) and Discipline model (χ2 (6) = 3.084, p=.798; CFI = 1.00; RMSEA = .00; SRMR = .018) provided a good fit with the data. The Monitoring model did not provide a good fit with the data; however, the items of this scale demonstrated moderately high internal consistency (α = .706). Early-adolescent reports on subscales of the MPQ-A were significantly correlated in the expected directions to subscales of the PSS and MICS. As shown in Table 2, early-adolescents’ reports of maternal guidance and affection were positively related to maternal use of communication affect, and negatively related to maternal use of critical rejection, psychological aggression, and violent discipline. Monitoring was positively related to use of communication affect and negatively related to critical rejection and violent discipline. Communication/Discipline was positively related to communication affect and positively related to critical rejection, psychological aggression, and violent discipline. Verbal and physical discipline were negatively related to critical rejection, psychological aggression, and violent discipline. These findings provide initial evidence of the validity of the MPQ-A for use with early adolescents in Peru.

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