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Showing 1 through 5 of 3,219 records.
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2013 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 188 words || 
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1. Fowler, Eric. "Adult Crime, Adult Time?: Stigma Effect and Implications of Juvenile Transfer to Adult Court" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p674446_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Processing juveniles in adult criminal court has become an increasingly regular practice in the United States since the superpredator craze of the 1980’s and 1990’s. While transfer practices continue to affect the lives of hundreds of thousands of youths and their families each year, research has provided mixed findings regarding the conviction and sentencing of these youths in adult court. In particular, the question remains whether the transfer process itself carries an inherent stigma that elicits atypical responses from adult court actors. The current study capitalizes on a change in legislation in the state of Connecticut that provides a natural experiment to assess the causal impact of juvenile transfer on later sentencing outcomes. This legislation raised the age for adult criminal court prosecution in that 16 year olds processed prior to 2010 were automatically adults and after 2010 they were redefined as “juveniles” such that only a select sample of youths would be transferred to adult court. Results of this quasi-experimental study employing propensity score matching techniques offers a detailed glimpse into the juvenile transfer phenomenon and its wider implications for American youth.

2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 8070 words || 
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2. Harzold, Elizabeth. and Sparks, Lisa. "When the Parent has Cancer: Adult Child Perceptions of Communication Competency, Humor Orientation, and Relational Satisfaction in the Older Adult Parent-Adult Child Relationship" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Online <PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p90214_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Abstract
This study takes a life span developmental communicative approach to examine the relationships between communication competency, humor orientation, and relational satisfaction in the older adult parent-adult child dyad when the parent has been diagnosed with cancer. Results indicate that communication competency is associated with humor orientation and relational satisfaction while humor itself may operate in more complex ways within the family cancer context. As predicted, communication competency had a significantly positive correlation with both humor orientation and relational satisfaction. Humor orientation was not significantly correlated with relational satisfaction. Content analysis of open-ended data revealed that discussing diagnosis and treatment procedures with children was often a satisfying conversation whereas withholding information had an adverse affect. The discussion of parents' feelings during the cancer period was complex. Humor was often used as a coping or relief function for discussing side effects of cancer treatment.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 8093 words || 
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3. Metts, Sandra., Beverly, Amy. and Asbury, Bryan. "A Comparison of Maintenance Strategies in the Friendships of Young Adults, Middle Age Adults, and Older Adults" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p369361_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A sample of 387 adults (18 to 97 years of age) completed questionnaires assessing maintenance strategies and satisfaction in a close friendship. Results indicated that all strategies were correlated with satisfaction. However, young adult and older adult friends used more routine contact and activity than middle age adult friends. Young adult friends used more social networking and instrumental support than other age groups. Older adult friends used more avoidance of negativity than other age groups.

2010 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 197 words || 
Info
4. Kurlychek, Megan. "Juvenile or Adult: Status Differentials and Sentencing in Adult Criminal Court" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, Nov 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p431880_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Prior research has found that juveniles transferred to adult court suffer a “juvenile penalty” in which they are subject to more severe sentencing outcomes than comparable young adults. This difference remains even after utilizing propensity score matching to ensure comparable samples and controlling for a multitude of factors known to impact sentencing. While the authors of prior research suggest this effect may be due to the “atypical” status of a juvenile in adult court, this hypothesis has yet to be tested. The current research is therefore designed to test this hypothesis using a four state sample of sentencing data from states that define either 16 (North Carolina and New York), 17 (South Carolina), or 18 (Pennsylvania) as the age of adulthood for criminal court processing. If it is indeed the atypical status of a juvenile in adult court that influences sentencing, I argue that such differentials in sentencing should not exist in states that simply define 16 and 17-year-olds as adults. Preliminary analysis indicates that not only does transfer status have significant implications for adult court processing, but that this effect is further conditioned by mode of transfer and type of offense.

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 206 words || 
Info
5. Tavcer, Scharie. "Under-Reporting of Sexual Assault: The Crime Funnel Effect on Adult-on-Adult Sexual Assault" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p513105_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Sexual assault perpetrated against adults is a heinous and underreported crime in Canadian society (Brennan & Taylor-Butts, 2008; Kong, Johns, Beattie & Cardillo, 2003). Victim focused research informs that one of the main reasons for this underreporting is the belief that if perpetrators are brought to court, they will receive short sentences if they are indeed convicted (Beattie & Cardillo, 2003) and when they do, sentence lengths are disproportionately low (Kong, Johns, Beattie & Cardillo, 2003) including that there is virtually no minimum term of imprisonment upon conviction. This attrition of cases (from arrest to conviction) is described as the crime funnel effect and is considered one of the key causes for underreporting of sexual assault. Sexual assault arrest, conviction and sentencing data will be collected towards the following hypotheses. One, that the median sentence lengths for sexual assault convictions are significantly less than compared to assault (another violent crime); two, that approximately 10% of sexual assault arrests go to court; and three, that perpetrators who are brought to court and/or incarcerated upon conviction, are primarily strangers to their victims. By applying a quantitative methodology, total number of cases will be discovered, median sentence lengths will be calculated, and the crime funnel effect will be illustrated.

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