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2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 8070 words || 
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1. Harzold, Elizabeth. and Sparks, Lisa. "When the Parent has Cancer: Adult Child Perceptions of Communication Competency, Humor Orientation, and Relational Satisfaction in the Older Adult Parent-Adult Child Relationship" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Online <PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p90214_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Abstract
This study takes a life span developmental communicative approach to examine the relationships between communication competency, humor orientation, and relational satisfaction in the older adult parent-adult child dyad when the parent has been diagnosed with cancer. Results indicate that communication competency is associated with humor orientation and relational satisfaction while humor itself may operate in more complex ways within the family cancer context. As predicted, communication competency had a significantly positive correlation with both humor orientation and relational satisfaction. Humor orientation was not significantly correlated with relational satisfaction. Content analysis of open-ended data revealed that discussing diagnosis and treatment procedures with children was often a satisfying conversation whereas withholding information had an adverse affect. The discussion of parents' feelings during the cancer period was complex. Humor was often used as a coping or relief function for discussing side effects of cancer treatment.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 8093 words || 
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2. Metts, Sandra., Beverly, Amy. and Asbury, Bryan. "A Comparison of Maintenance Strategies in the Friendships of Young Adults, Middle Age Adults, and Older Adults" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p369361_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A sample of 387 adults (18 to 97 years of age) completed questionnaires assessing maintenance strategies and satisfaction in a close friendship. Results indicated that all strategies were correlated with satisfaction. However, young adult and older adult friends used more routine contact and activity than middle age adult friends. Young adult friends used more social networking and instrumental support than other age groups. Older adult friends used more avoidance of negativity than other age groups.

2013 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 188 words || 
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3. Fowler, Eric. "Adult Crime, Adult Time?: Stigma Effect and Implications of Juvenile Transfer to Adult Court" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p674446_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Processing juveniles in adult criminal court has become an increasingly regular practice in the United States since the superpredator craze of the 1980’s and 1990’s. While transfer practices continue to affect the lives of hundreds of thousands of youths and their families each year, research has provided mixed findings regarding the conviction and sentencing of these youths in adult court. In particular, the question remains whether the transfer process itself carries an inherent stigma that elicits atypical responses from adult court actors. The current study capitalizes on a change in legislation in the state of Connecticut that provides a natural experiment to assess the causal impact of juvenile transfer on later sentencing outcomes. This legislation raised the age for adult criminal court prosecution in that 16 year olds processed prior to 2010 were automatically adults and after 2010 they were redefined as “juveniles” such that only a select sample of youths would be transferred to adult court. Results of this quasi-experimental study employing propensity score matching techniques offers a detailed glimpse into the juvenile transfer phenomenon and its wider implications for American youth.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Gasiorek, Jessica. "Identity Continuity and Intergenerational Communication as Predictors of Young Adults’ Evaluations of Older Adults and Attitudes Toward Aging" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1108021_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examined how young adults’ (1) sense of identity continuity (operationalized as perceived similarity to their future self); (2) experiences of negative environmental messages about aging; and (3) experiences of accommodation and nonaccommodation from older adults predict their views of older adults and their attitudes toward aging (i.e., the process of intergroup transition). This study's results show that intergenerational communication is associated with young adults’ attitudes toward aging, as well as their evaluations of older adults as a social group. Notably, nonaccommodation—- a form of communication that often highlights intergroup differences-- was the most consistent significant predictor of attitudes related to the process of aging.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
5. Martinez, Michael. "Pre-adult Family Structure and Young Adult Political Participation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1120982_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Several decades ago, the socialization literature established that parents and family structure had a limited effect on young people’s political orientations, but that for the most part, a life long learning model described the development of those political orientations. The rich long-term linked panels originally launched by Jennings and Niemi were central in helping us determine the moderately strong influence of parents on the acquisition of partisanship, but their limited influence on the acquisition of political efficacy and other patterns of political participation. More recently, other scholars have found other significant influences of family structure on participation (such as widowhood [Hobbs, Christakis, and Fowler AJPS 2014], marriage [Stoker and Jennings APSR 1995], and the presence of children [Wolfinger and Wolfinger, Social Forces 2008]).

While the Jennings and Niemi panel is rich in its measurement of political attitudes of both youth and parents, it is both dated and limited in its ability to address how some aspects of family structure affect political participation. Some of those limitations might be addressed by examining the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. NLSY97 has been extensively used by sociologists who study the effects of family structure and background on the likelihood of participating in social welfare programs, educational achievement, as well as encounters with the criminal justice system. The inclusion of voter participation survey questions in the 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010 waves of this large panel (beginning with 9000 youth in the 1997 wave) allow us to address whether there are differences in participation rates between youths from “traditional” two-parent families and from other “non-traditional” families, and whether those effects are moderated by educational or income achievement. Preliminary analyses suggest that voter turnout in young adult years is higher among people who lived in two parent households as a teen. In the full analysis, controls will be introduced, and implications for establishing the baselines for habitual models of voting will be addressed.

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