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2013 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10527 words || 
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1. Borelli, Emily. and Keister, Lisa. "Enduring Advantages: Explaining the Chinese and Indian Immigrant Wealth Advantage in the U.S." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 09, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-01-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p651143_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, we build upon theories of segmented assimilation and wealth attainment to construct a theory of wealth accumulation that emphasizes enduring advantages. Enduring advantages are human and physical capital advantages that encourage positive selection from immigrants’ home countries and persist throughout the immigration experience, resulting in disparate patterns of economic mobility. Using the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP), we first situate Chinese and Indian immigrants within the U.S. wealth distribution by comparing their wealth to native wealth and confirm the presence of the Chinese/Indian wealth advantages. We describe the wealth of established immigrants who have lived in the U.S. an average of 15 years, and predict their likelihood of belonging to the middle or upper class. Using the New Immigrant Survey (NIS), we analyze asset ownership and net worth of new immigrants to the U.S., whose average U.S. tenure is less than 3 years to establish a starting point for immigrant wealth. Our research presents three key findings on immigrant wealth. First, while both Indian and Chinese immigrants experience a wealth advantage, different factors contribute to the successful wealth accumulation of these groups. Second, new Indian immigrants arrive in the U.S. with a wealth advantage that Chinese immigrants, as a group, do not have. Finally, foreign assets are an important contributing factor in the Chinese/Indian wealth advantage. Importantly, this research emphasizes the effects of processes occurring throughout the life course on immigrant economic incorporation, including events occurring outside of the U.S. and prior to migration.

2015 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 48 words || 
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2. Mady, Callie. "Immigrant Students’ Bilingual Advantage in French immersion in Canada: Linking Advantages to Contextual Variables" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Fairmont Royal York, Toronto, ON, Canada, Mar 21, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-01-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p930372_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Grounded in the Dynamic Model of Multilingualism, this study compares the English and French achievement of three groups of Grade 6 French immersion participants: Canadian-born English-speaking, Canadian-born multilingual, and immigrant multilingual students. The research explores the relationship between language achievement and metalinguistic awareness, strategy use, and language proficiencies.

2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10966 words || 
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3. Li, Su. "Students’ Social Network Structure in Secondary Schools: Does it Explain Females’ Advantage in College Advantage?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 14, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-01-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p412277_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research uses the social network approach to pursue explanations for females’ advantage in post-secondary education enrollment. The study investigates the gender difference in high school friendship network structural characteristics and proposes that girls’ friendship network structure can partially explain their outstanding performance in post-secondary education attendance. A large sample data analysis shows that one’s friends’ academic performance in an earlier time in secondary education can positively impact the person’s later post-secondary education attendance. Network structure characteristics have direct effects on the possibility of one’s post-secondary education attendance. Young women and men do not have significant difference in their friends’ average self reported grades. But young men and women significantly differ by the structural characteristics of their friendship networks. The mean difference by gender on network structures can explain some of the female advantage in post-secondary education enrollment.

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 8174 words || 
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4. Domina, Thurston. "Leveling the Home Advantage: Educational Equity and Parental Involvement in School" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-01-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p107827_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the last two decades, a great deal of energy and attention has been dedicated to generating educational equity by increasing the involvement of parents in schools. Previous research suggests that black and Hispanic parents are more involved in their children’s education than white parents are (Kerbow and Bernhardt, 1993; Sui-Chu and Willms, 1996). However, the available literature also makes it clear that poor, black and Latino children benefit less from their parent’s efforts at school than white children do (McNeal, 1999; Sui-Chu and Willms, 1996, Lareau, 1989).
This paper brings two hypotheses to bear on these findings, using data from the National Household Education Survey. First, I examine the possibility that minority parents tend to be involved in their children’s education in different ways than majority parents, and that this difference affects children’s educational outcomes. Second, I examine the possibility that identical levels of parental involvement have differential effects based on the parent’s race and class. My analyses support both of these hypotheses and help explain the race and class gaps in parental involvement and children’s educational performance.

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 2 pages || Words: 421 words || 
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5. Green, Sara. "When Internality Is Not an Advantage: Locus of Control and the World Trade Center Tragedy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-01-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p107038_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines the effects of September 11 on Locus of Control (LOC) and its consequences among university students in Florida. Ninety-four students participated in the study prior September 11 while 129 participated in the months following the attack. There are no significant differences between the two groups of students in terms of demographic characteristics often associated with LOC and/or depression. Findings indicate, however, that the two groups differ in important ways in terms of both levels of internality and the impact of internality on depression. The average level of internality is significantly lower in the group participating after September 11. In addition, results of multiple regression analysis indicate that, as expected from previous research, in the pre-tragedy group, internality exerts a significant main affect on depression while powerful others is significantly positively related to depression. Among students who participated after September 11, the patterns of relationships are startlingly different. None of the LOC dimensions has a significant main affect on depression. When the interaction terms are added to the equation, however, both internality and powerful others are associated with increased depression. Further, the internality X powerful others interaction term is significant and negative--indicating that the positive impact of internality on depression is strongest when belief in powerful others is low. These findings have important implications for the application of Locus of Control theory in situations in which the life experiences of individuals have been dramatically affected by the actions of others.

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