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2011 - AWP Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 236 words || 
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1. Humphries, Keri. "From Patient to Advocate: Expanding our Base of Advocates Through Systems Change" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AWP Annual Conference, Hyatt Regency Philadelphia at Penns Landing, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 03, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p488260_index.html>
Publication Type: POSTER
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In order to protect and advance reproductive rights, non-profit feminist organization must seek to create or include a new population of advocates. Planned Parenthood of Southern New England began a project to engage patients as advocates in the clinic, using a systems change effort to strengthen results.

2004 - International Studies Association Pages: 12 pages || Words: 4579 words || 
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2. Burgerman, Susan. "(Why) Is Police Reform an Emerging Issue for Human Rights Advocates?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p73228_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Human rights advocates have long focused on demilitarizing public security, particularly in countries where internal security, public order, and policing were conducted by the military or defense ministry. The emphasis on removing the military from internal security reflected assumptions generally held among political analysts and rights experts that the proper role of the military in society is confined to the protection of national sovereignty and territorial integrity, and that engaging the armed forces in policing civilians is inherently dangerous. An important element of several recent political transitions in Latin America has been the withdrawal of public security from the military's remit, deployment of all-civilian police forces, and initiation of reforms to the judicial and penal systems. Separating internal security provision from the military and protesting external police training programs – especially those funded and provided by the US Department of Justice and Agency for International Development – were significant elements of human rights advocacy during the 1970s, 1980s, and even into the 1990s. Since the mid-1990s, high profile human rights organizations based in the US have developed programs that work directly with local police forces on training, monitoring, and oversight. They are also coordinating their work with the very US government agencies that they previously targeted for protest. These organizations have undergone a perceptible shift in how they view police forces: from enemies requiring control to necessary components of a democratic society requiring assistance. Unfortunately, as authoritarian methods of fighting crime are phased out, the new democratic policing systems and reformed justice agencies are not yet consolidated or effective enough to ensure public security. This has contributed in many cases to the appearance of a contradiction between human rights norms and citizen security. This paper will examine what changes in domestic and/or international contexts, or in advocates' understandings of appropriate and effective strategies, led to a perceptual shift that resulted in placing police reform on the agenda of human rights advocacy organizations. It will further explore how this case may inform the research program on the evolution of international norms.

2004 - The Law and Society Association Words: 218 words || 
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3. Young, Rosalie. "Are Lawyers Practicing Family Law Advocates for Mediation?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Renaissance Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, May 27, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p116931_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Disputing parties dealing with family issues frequently consult with attorneys. The lawyers' knowledge of and feelings about mediation will influence whether mediation is one of the options considered by the disputants. I conducted in-depth interviews with lawyers who practice family law in several courts in a mid-sized northeastern city.
While some lawyers have embraced mediation and readily refer clients to mediators, other lawyers mistrust a process that fosters increased client control and reduces the lawyer’s involvement. Preliminary results indicate that most critical of mediation are those lawyers who concentrate on representing clients who are seeking to dissolve their marriages. They view mediation as a threat to their clients’ well being. In contrast, those lawyers who only infrequently represent divorcing parties or whose focus is on a greater variety of family court issues, often speak more positively about mediation. They express the view that disputing parties have a better understanding of their own needs and the needs of their children than do either lawyers or judges. These family lawyers recommend mediation when the parties are able to communicate their needs and preferences effectively with each other. Only by understanding and responding to the views of legal practitioners can mediation’s advocates make mediation more readily accessible.

2008 - APSA 2008 Annual Meeting Pages: 27 pages || Words: 9261 words || 
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4. Bownas, Richard. "Advocating for the Poor? Transnational Campaigns Against GM Crops in India" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA 2008 Annual Meeting, Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p280126_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

2008 - The Law and Society Association Words: 142 words || 
Info
5. Lahav, Alexandra. "Hear the Other Side: The Dilemma of the Advocate before an Unfair Hearing" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Bonaventure, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 27, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p236765_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper develops an analytical framework for understanding choices open to lawyers asked to advocate at an unfair hearing. The lawyer before an unfair hearing faces a moral dilemma: participate and be complicit or refuse and leave the client defenseless. In dealing with this dilemma, lawyers face four options: collective boycott, individual conscientious refusal, internal resistance (marshalling the legal avenues available within the confines of the law) and external resistance (putting the tribunal on trial in the court of public opinion). The paper develops each of these options using case studies from the controversy surrounding the Military Commissions in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and a few other historical examples. It considers the different models of the lawyer’s role and of political responsibility imbedded in each of these options and the costs and consequences of the lawyers’ choices.

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