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2011 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 376 words || 
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1. Padios, Jan. "Feeling Natural: Affect, Affective Labor, and Colonial Legacies in the Philippine Call Center Industry" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD, Oct 20, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p509661_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In his essay “Servicing the World,” anthropologist Martin Manalansan writes that “Filipinos are the pawns in the game of global restructuring of capital as they constitute one of the most visible and geographically expansive flows of flexible labor” (2010), especially in the global service industry. Furthermore, as Philippine Studies scholars from sociology to literature have demonstrated, both “flexibility” and an aptitude for work that requires affective labor—such as nursing—have been socially constructed as capacities natural to Filipinos. Articulated by the Philippine government and other institutions, such claims form the ideological cornerstone for the continuous relegation of Filipinos to the bottom of contemporary society. What does it mean, however, when actually existing workers articulate these very same claims? What is it like to feel naturally good at service work or affective labor in a postcolonial context shaped by the exigencies of global capital? Do such feelings constitute affective labor in and of themselves?

Unlike scholarship that understands naturalizing discourses as master narratives dominated by the state, this paper attempts to understand them as having meaning for, and thus reproduced by, call center agents in the Philippine call center industry. Based on ethnographic data with call center workers in Manila, I argue that such naturalizing claims are indicative of workers’ affective states, where affect is defined as “a body’s registered sensation of a moment of existing relationally, interactively, in the world” (Gould 2010) and the “the capacity to affect and be affected” (Stewart 2007). If, as Deborah Gould has demonstrated, “affective states are…the complicated outgrowth over time of various sensory experiences” (2010, 31), I ask how the past—specifically a history of colonization by the United States—contributes to the production and reproduction of this affective state. This paper asks, in others words, how we can understand “feeling natural” in terms of what Cvetkovich (2007) might call an “affective legacy” of “racialized histories” of colonization of the Philippines by the U.S., as well Spain and Japan. Moreover, I ask how these affective states allow workers to reimagine the Philippines’ colonial history. Motivated by a deep interest in challenging analyses that imply workers’ false-consciousness, I posit that affect and imagination, as analytic tools, offer important ways to understand workers’ experiences of the conditions of their labor, as well as the past.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 11309 words || 
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2. Joseph, Kenneth. and Carley, Kathleen. "Inferring Affective Perceptions from Text using Natural Language Processing, Bayesian Inference and Affect Control Theory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1006666_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Affect Control Theory (ACT) is a powerful tool in aiding our understanding of social events and the identities and behaviors within them. ACT scholars have developed both a mathematical model of social events and, through surveys, dictionaries detailing the affective meaning of many identities and behaviors. In a recently submitted article, we developed a novel methodology that utilized techniques from ACT, Natural Language Processing and Bayesian inference to infer perceptions of identities and behaviors in a large corpus of newspaper data relevant to the Arab Spring. Our efforts provide a unique approach to extracting affective meaning from text and a useful new tool for ACT scholars. In this proposal, we review this approach and results we obtained from it and then discuss three ways in which we plan to extend these previous efforts.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 188 words || 
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3. Laird, Chryl. and Wamble, Julian. "Black In Name Only?: How Racialized Rhetoric Affects White Republican Affect" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1129431_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Among many of the newly elected black Republican officials in 2014, and in numerous speeches made by presidential hopeful Dr. Ben Carson, there has been a call for society to “move beyond race.” This kind of rhetoric seems to resonate with white Republican audiences who, according to existing literature are more inclined to view black politicians as more liberal and Democratic than white politicians. This paper asks- Does the use of racialized rhetoric affect the support black Republican politicians and candidates gain from white Republican voters? While the findings in existing literature vary, what is clear is the strong role that stereotypes play in white attitudes towards black politicians. We offer racial attitude validation as a mechanism that explains how some black Republicans are able to obtain support from whites and overcome the stereotypes that current literature claims keeps them from adequately attaining strong support among whites. Through experimental methods, we find that the use of a particular kind of racialized rhetoric allows black Republicans to distance themselves from the stereotypes that they are more liberal and Democratic with the result of higher affective support among white Republicans.

2016 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 375 words || 
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4. Nadkarni, Asha. "Outsourcing Affect and the Affects of "Outsourced"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Denver, Colorado, <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1133543_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: U.S. public opinion of business process outsourcing (BPO) has been largely negative. As exemplified by the Lou Dobbs Tonight show segment titled “Exporting America,” opponents of outsourcing consider the movement of jobs from the United States to locations in the Global South a threat to U.S. economic futures. Instead, as the title “Exporting America” suggests, the promise of economic security granted by the “American dream” is being lost – shipped overseas along with jobs. Within this narrative, the victims of globalization are inevitably portrayed as white middle class men.

Against such polarized and polarizing views of outsourcing, critics such as Shehzad Nadeem (2011), Purnima Mankaker (2015), and Kalindi Vora (2015) have examined how the affective labor of outsourcing impacts call center workers in India. Tracking how such workers are forced to conform to U.S. time zones, ways of speaking, and cultural norms, these critics show how the affective labor of producing either a “neutral” or explicitly “American” affect is not only an act of impersonation that becomes an aspirational act of self making, or personation (Mankaker), but also is labor that helps to sustain life in the Global North at the expense of Indian workers (Vora).

This paper situates these issues through an examination of the 2006 film, Outsourced, and the short-lived 2010 sitcom of the same name. In both the film and the television series, the dilemmas of outsourcing are staged through the specter of the white male middle manager from middle America (Kansas City) traveling to India to train Indian call center workers. The paper suggests that both the movie and the television show rely on old stereotypes of India (jokes about gastrointestinal distress and spiritual epiphanies abound), while also animating new ones related to the mimetic qualities of Indian laborers. In doing so, it argues that Outsourced minimizes the affective labor necessarily performed by Indian call center workers (as they attempt to manufacture a sense of “home” for their U.S. customers), by dramatizing outsourcing as a crisis of white U.S. masculinity. Furthermore, this paper suggests that the migration of jobs is linked to earlier labor migrations of people – such as information technology (IT) workers brought to the United States on H-1B visas – that are embedded in longer imperial legacies.

2017 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 9870 words || 
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5. Zhang, Xueying. "Sharing Health Risk Messages on Social Networking Sites: How Cognitive and Affective Elaboration Affects Behavioral Intention" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1280702_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using experiment, this study aimed to examine how fear appeal message and individual differences combined in driving users’ intentions to sharing health risk messages on Social Networking Sites (SNSs). Results suggested the cognitive elaborations interacted with fear emotion in driving sharing intentions, while the concerns for image management on SNS served to restrain the impulse to share health risk messages. Theoretical and practical implications for message design were discussed.

Key words: Social Networking Site, Share, Health risk message, Fear appeal, Image Management Concern

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