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2010 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 261 words || 
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1. Hertkorn, Michaela. "“Out-of-Area in Afghanistan: NATO’s Mission and Afghanistan’s Future”, or “Doomed Together? NATO’s Stakes in Afghanistan and Central Asia”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA, Nov 11, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p439412_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper addresses questions relating to the overall strategic goal of the US and its NATO and European allies in Afghanistan. It explores what the current US American ‘Af-Pak’ policy, incepted by President Obama in 2009, has meant for the US, its allies and the region of Central and South East Asia.

The US decision to send more civilian and military troops to Afghanistan raises a number of questions with implications for international security and regional stability. How will the shift in US foreign and security policy from a counter-terrorism strategy towards a counter-insurgency strategy, which emphasizes the protection of civilians, further impact how Afghans perceive the US mission and the involvement of the international community in Afghanistan? Does this shift in policy in effect come eight years too late?

US allies, such as European partners in NATO are wrestling with demands for their own troop surges. In Berlin and other European capitals governments have struggled with how to best sell the continued Afghanistan war-effort, which exceeds a UN peacekeeping mission, to its war-weary populations. In May 2010, Germany's former President resigned over remarks that Germany needed to support NATO efforts in Afghanistan because of its own trade interests in Central Asia.

We will addresses some of the post-war challenges, which the people of Afghanistan face as a nation and in the region.


Some of the thoughts in this paper have flown into a newly created grad course on NATO in Afghanistan, which I will offer and teach at the New School for General Studies in the fall 2010 semester.

2010 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 114 words || 
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2. Brightman, Hank. "Afghanistan 2011: Applying Game Theory and Nash Equilibrium to Development and Corruption Control in Afghanistan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, Nov 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p431240_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) continues to strive for stability and security in war weary Afghanistan. Yet such efforts are routinely thwarted by what Western culture perceives as indigenous public corruption, tribal intimidation, and a lack of efficacy in project completion. The purpose of this session is to examine the challenges that the ISAF faces in meeting its objectives in a nation that appears prima facie to possess limited interest in obtaining them. However, this presentation will not focus on the ethno-sociological aspects of bringing change to Afghanistan; but rather applies the mathematical concepts of extensive form game theory and Nash Equilibrium in order to understand the inevitability of corruption in this model.

2005 - International Studies Association Words: 109 words || 
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3. Munton, Don. "Dynamics of Western Public Attitudes: From Afghanistan to Afghanistan, and Iraq" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p69849_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In an analytical world dominated by the realist model, public attitudes tend to receive but passing attention. The changes in the international system from the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979 to the more recent conflict in Afghanistan and the US invasion of Iraq have reflected more than power shifts and realpolitik calculations. They have also reflected significant shifts in public perceptions and preferences, particularly in the western alliance. And they have reflected a growing, rather than diminishing, gap between the American public and those of its allies. This paper will explore these dynamics, and assess the nature of the impact of public attitudes on policy and international society.

2005 - International Studies Association Words: 317 words || 
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4. Levine, Corey. "Gender and Transitional Justice: A Case Study of Afghanistan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p70261_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As an integral part of the human security agenda, in the last decade or so we have seen a huge increase in the development of mechanisms to address crimes committed during conflict, often referred to as transitional justice. This includes truth and reconciliation commissions, Special Courts, ad hoc tribunals such as for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, as well as the International Criminal Court. While issues of transitional justice remain highly charged flashpoints in many countries emerging from conflict, with societal wounds still open and in need of treatment, political and legal changes are occurring at such a rapid rate that practitioners and policymakers in the field must improvise as each new challenge presents itself. Yet very little of either the developments in the field of transitional justice or the study of these developments provide any perspective from a gender lens. The limited research that has been conducted in this area, most notably two UN studies undertaken in response to UN Security Council Resolution 1325 (October 2000), indicate that the modeling and analysis of transitional justice practices would be improved if gender-based perspectives were included, enriching our understanding of factors that lead up to armed conflict and thus improve our ability to cope with their aftermath. Hence, the proposed paper will provide a gender analysis of transitional justice both from the international legal perspective as well as from a national viewpoint, using the current work being done on transitional justice and women's rights in Afghanistan. The paper will briefly look at the evolution of how sexual violence is now being addressed within international law as well as identify those gaps in which gender crimes committed in armed conflict are not addressed in international law. The Afghanistan case study will illustrate whether international law regarding gender crimes has utility and how these crimes can be addressed within a transitional justice framework.

2005 - International Studies Association Words: 183 words || 
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5. Bran, Roberto. "Only Star in the Sky: The Influence of the Ivory Tower on Nation-Building in Afghanistan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p69924_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the aftermath of the tragic events of September 11th, the United States led a multinational coalition into Afghanistan that toppled the Taliban regime and marked the beginning of the Global War on Terrorism. But as the world would quickly learn, it proved to be much easier to drive the Taliban from power and install a new regime than it was to destroy the Taliban-led insurgency that followed or to consolidate the Karzai government's control and capability. The road to nation-building was visible, but the world had no idea how to make their way there. This paper will examine the role that academic studies played in providing guidance and direction to the international nation-building effort in Afghanistan. Particular attention will be paid to the role that Brian McAllister Linn's historical accounts of the U.S. Army's counterinsurgency in the Philippines played in devising Combined Forces Command - Afghanistan's post-Taliban campaign plan, as well as the influence of Hernando De Soto's The Mystery of Capitalism in the Italian-led multinational effort to reconstruct the Afghan judicial system under the Rule of Law Project.

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