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2006 - American Society of Criminology (ASC) Words: 132 words || 
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1. Opolot, Ejakait. "Armed Conflict and Environmental Crimes in Africa: Evidence from East Africa, Southern Africa, and West Africa" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology (ASC), Los Angeles Convention Center, Los Angeles, CA, Nov 01, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p126761_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: ARMED CONFLICT AND ENVIRONMENTAL CRIMES IN AFRICA: EVIDENCE FROM EAST AFRICA, SOUTHERN AFRICA, AND WEST AFRICA

EJAKAIT (J.S.E.) OPOLOT, PH.D.
PROFESSOR
DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS
TEXAS SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY
HOUSTON, TEXAS 77004

ABSRACT

Long overdue for criminological analysis in Africa is the nexus between armed conflict and environmental crimes as non-conventional crimes. A starting point to do this analysis involves a critical review of the literature that has been generated in such disciplines as agronomy, political science, economics, history, anthropology, and international relations. It is against this background that this paper has been written with a focus on the nexus between armed conflict and environmental crimes in East Africa, Southern Africa, and West Africa, utilizing the existing evidence in the literature. The goal is to further develop production of African criminological knowledge.

2004 - International Studies Association Words: 114 words || 
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2. Vale, Peter. "Africa? Africa? . . . Where's Africa: Intellectual Hegemony, Distant Corners and War" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p74508_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Slide-lined by international relations for decades, understandings of Africa have been ghettoised in set and routine of explanations a particular social phenomenon. And yet, Africa has much to tell us about the unfolding processes of contemporary international relations. The seeming determination of states to survive notwithstanding their imminent collapse, huge gaps between wealth and poverty, and elites that are determined prey on both populations and the processes of states. Using critical theory, mainly, this paper will suggest that rather than Africa being the proverbial 'lost continent', political events in on the continent point the way to understandings of hegemony, power ideology and practice in other corners – distant and non-so-distant – of the world.

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Pages: 25 pages || Words: 7106 words || 
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3. Odoom, Isaac. "Evaluating China-Africa Development Relations: Is China more than simply financing development in Africa?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p502958_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: China is rising as a key global economic and political actor. Its increasing economic and political relations with developing countries, particularly with those in Africa, in the last decade is striking. China’s rise in Africa and elsewhere is important for a variety of reasons. For some China’s emergence onto the global stage, particularly in Africa, compels African governments and their counterparts in the South to reflect on and adopt initiatives that address their development challenges. Others suggest it gives Africa leverage in its relations with the North. The rise of China in Africa increases the choice of African countries on financing development. However, a more nuanced understanding regarding the varied impacts that China can have on Africa’s development path is needed. This paper examines China’s current engagements in Africa and its implications on the concept of ‘development’—the ideas, institutions, actors, norms, and practices that govern development efforts in Africa. The paper suggests that the rise of China in Africa is more than simply increasing the choice of African countries on financing development. China’s development rhetoric and practices present a potential challenge to the (western) development paradigm. This potential challenge has implications for the development project itself and how it has been promoted in Africa and elsewhere post-World War II.

2010 - NCOBPS 41st Annual Meeting Words: 368 words || 
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4. Maposa, Bose. "'Its Africa's turn': Putting 'symbolic' politics into perspective with South Africa 2010" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCOBPS 41st Annual Meeting, Doubletree Hotel-Buckhead, Atlanta, GA, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p399807_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: In what Cornelissen (2005) calls ‘the global tourism system’ we find sporting mega-events as the new players on the field. These have joined the league of strategies for both economic and political development as part of the exigencies of globalization, (Black, 2007). Sporting mega-events not only serve as fountains of well- carved messages to control and shape perceptions about host countries or cities; they also strengthen and establish an image. This is evident in the packaging of these narratives which includes the bidding process where internal, external, domestic and international audiences are lured with potential benefits and opportunities perceived; a charm that usually includes noble bidding claims and continues during the games through the opening and closing ceremonies. South Africa’s bidding for the 2010 FIFA Soccer World Cup was no different. This paper will look at South Africa’s journey to winning the bid. Furthermore it undertakes a narrative analysis of what will be argued as South African mega-event addiction. It contends that the narratives used in the bidding processes to secure the right to hold these events is symbolic in that the promises and benefits of these mega-events do not necessarily trickle down to the ordinary citizens from whom it is supposed to benefit. The perceived power of sports in globalization, nation building, and reinforcing positive societal values, as argued by Black (2007), is sometimes rhetoric in mega-events as tension exists between overcoming and highlighting differences. The fundamental construction of the narratives is a promise to address and reconstruct old questions of power, identity and inequality for South Africans, as a step towards the direction of a reconstruction of post-colonial Africa and post Apartheid South Africa; a new direction encompassing the rebirth of the whole African continent. However, the paper posits a persuasive argument that without an objective evaluation, the quest shall remain elitist and self serving to all but a few elites and politicians, but under the banner of inclusion and development for all. It shall be concluded that if South Africa is to gain the political mileage it seeks, and a moral identity, its positioning must remain in formulating a strategy that will not only make the world cup successful, but also one that is sustainable.

2012 - 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 296 words || 
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5. Jackson, Regine. "Back to Africa? Haitian Émigrés in Postcolonial Africa" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Mar 07, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p561159_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper uses archival research and oral history to trace the intersecting histories of migration from Haiti and postcolonial African development programs. I begin with the Haitian émigrés who participated in the civilian unit of the Organisation des National Unies au Congo (United Nations Organization in the Congo), 1960 - 1964. I describe the conditions that precipitated and facilitated the migration as well as what motivated Haitians to participate in the ONUC. The paper relies heavily on analysis of primary source documents at the Schomburg Center for Research on Black Culture and the United Nations archives – especially the papers of Maurice Dartigue and the Ralph Bunche Papers. My objective is to move beyond interpretations of Haitian émigrés that neglect their awareness of themselves as global actors or their interests in contributing to African development. Conceptually, I approach these migrants, not simply as exiles or pan-Africanists, but as diasporic subjects in the dual sense that Michel Foucault (1982) describes: “subject to someone else by control and dependence, and tied to his own identity by a conscience or self-knowledge” (212). My analysis shows that this cadre of middle class migrants – educators, engineers, agronomists and other professionals – occupied a simultaneously privileged and precarious space that shaped their diasporic subjectivities. The paper raises important questions about how scholars understand the post-1945, internationalist project of nation-building in Africa and the transnational linkages that shaped the contemporary Haitian diaspora. However, by focusing on Haitian migration to Africa through the ONUC, my aim is not only to expand current understandings of the geographies of the Haitian diaspora (Jackson 2011). “Back to Africa?” aims to bring 20th century Haitians into the history of black internationalism and to explore issues of power and the production of history around this significant postcolonial moment.

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