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2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Pages: 40 pages || Words: 11681 words || 
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1. Fritsch, Stefan. "Technology, Governance and Corporate (National) Identity: The Case of Siemens AG from a Postinternational Perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p500702_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In recent decades, Postinternationalism has developed into an influential perspective in International Relations (IR). Core concepts such as the “sphere of authority” (Rosenau) have been applied in the analysis of transformative developments in global politics with regards to diverse actors and issues as well as system structure and interaction processes. This paper suggests that a postinternational perspective in the field of International Political Economy (IPE) can also provide helpful insights with regard to Multinational Corporations (MNCs), and their role in and impact on technological evolution. Representing complex polities, MNCs have to accommodate various socio-political stakeholders, technological evolution, markets and national / global as well as public / private governance frameworks. As a case study, the paper will analyze the German Siemens AG, which is one of the oldest and largest MNCs in the world and has been a leader in the information and communication technology (ICT) sectors of the 20th/21st century. By analyzing Siemens’ struggles during the 1990s and 2000s to adapt to rapidly changing technology, new public policies (liberalization) and new corporate governance models, the paper highlights the complex interconnectedness of technology, economics, politics and identity that make up the international political economy of technological innovation.

2013 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 9552 words || 
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2. Garnett, Emily. ""Ag-Recording" Laws Disassembled" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC, Aug 08, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p665720_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Four “Ag-Recording laws” in place in Kansas, Montana, North Dakota, and Utah violate three major First Amendment rights. The laws are overly broad because they restrict a constitutionally protected form of speech, whistleblowing. They are content-based restrictions of speech that are not content-neutral, do not serve a compelling government interest, and are not minimally restrictive. Finally, two of the state laws in place in Kansas and Montana are examples of prior restraint.

2009 - 5th National Small Farm Conference Words: 260 words || 
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3. Jarman, James. "Small Farm Ag-Emergency Planning" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 5th National Small Farm Conference, Hilton Springfield Hotel and Prairie Capitol Convention Center, Springfield, Illinois, Sep 15, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p373696_index.html>
Publication Type: Oral Paper Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Small farmers and their families are likely to be particularly vulnerable during an agricultural emergency. Has anyone thought or planned to address their specific needs during an agricultural emergency? When a farming community has large family farms, corporate farms, corporate supported farms like poultry or swine operations, small farmers may be forgotten and receive less assistance.

In a farming community, there may be more people involved on small farms than on large farms. They may depend on their family and rural location for greater support and as an anchor for their philosophy on life. Also, they may be less flexible or tolerant to interference from forces outside the family and farm. Losses can cause a greater impact on their emotions and finances.

Small farm animal production is less likely to be associated with an outside production company. These companies are in a position to support the emergency actions needed and help insulate their employed farmer or farm family from an agricultural emergencies’ impact.

This Power Point covers the main points small farmers and their families need to think about if they and their farm are involved in an agricultural emergency. There are slides with examples of recent agricultural emergencies, the provisions of the Homeland Security Presidential Directive 9, current threats, the most serious threats, ways to lessen the individual farm’s threat, a discussion of the three most serious animal disease threats – foot and mouth disease, high path avian influenza and exotic Newcastle disease, the responses to these three diseases, and emergency management including mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery.

2018 - ASEH Annual Conference Words: 283 words || 
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4. Liepold, Annka. "‘Big Ag’ in Small-town America: How Olivia Breeds and Grows Corn for a Global Market" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Riverside Convention Center, Riverside, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1301449_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Oliva, MN, a town of 2,500 inhabitants in southwestern Minnesota, is closely entangled in the global corn market. It is the county seat of one of the top five corn growing counties in the US and home to 14 seed companies, ranging from local family-owned businesses to global corporations like Monsanto, DeKalb and Dow. This small-town community is mostly invisible on a larger scale, yet through corn it is tied into a larger consumption, distribution and legal network. On a global scale, corn seeds produced in Olivia are grown around the world and through seed producers’ growing agreements, agricultural subsidies and future contracts, companies and farmers are tied into larger legal and power frameworks. Olivia calls itself “the Corn Capital” and on a community level celebrates its stronghold in the corn seed and corn growing industry during annual festivities. The universal use and presence of corn stands in a stark contrast to the detachment and invisibility of the production regions. The fading visibility of the production sites became possible because corn was used for industrial purposes—a process that solidified with the emergence of the hybrid seed industry, which allowed customizing corn for its designated use. Today, it is virtually impossible to follow an individual bushel of corn from the field to the supermarket without it becoming part of a larger unit throughout the industrial processing chain. Looking at emergence of corn as a global commodity through one of its major regional production sites shows the complex networks seed companies, farmers, and local communities are tied into. For the global market the local production sites become invisible, yet on the regional level one can find a rich “corn culture,” such as in Olivia, MN.

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