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2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 4894 words || 
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1. Barrett, Anne. and Toothman, Erica. "Unpacking Age: The Emotional Consequences of Women’s Midlife Conceptions of Age and Aging" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p565314_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although age is a theoretically complex construct with multiple meanings, studies of age patterns in various social phenomena tend to “unpack” age to a limited degree. They give little attention to individuals’ conceptions of the aging process and own aging experiences, including their intersection with gender inequality. Using a sample of women from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (1995-1996 and 2004-2006), we address this issue by examining the relationship between age and affect using indicators tapping several facets of age and the aging experience, including functional age, personal aging anxieties, subjective age, conceptions of the timing of middle age, views of later life, and experiences of age discrimination. Cross-sectional analyses reveal that older women tend to report lower negative affect and more positive affect than younger women, partly stemming from older women’s more youthful identities. We also find that lower negative affect and more positive affect are associated with reporting more functional limitations, personal aging anxieties about health declines and loss of attractiveness, a more compressed view of the life course, and worse views of later life. Longitudinal analyses indicate that older women report a greater increase in positive affect and smaller increase in negative affect, compared with younger women. Reporting a greater increase in positive affect and smaller increase in negative affect between waves also was associated with having anxiety about health declines. Our study underscores the value of incorporating measures that tap multiple meanings of age and experiences of aging.
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2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 28 pages || Words: 7771 words || 
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2. Gabbadon, Nadine. "Examining the Industrial Construction of Age: Age Discourse in Advertising Age, 1965-2005" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 22, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p234390_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper examines data from Advertising Age, a well-known trade journal targeted to the advertising industry, to explore how age is discussed from 1965 to 2005. A discourse analysis shows increased market segmentation over the years, as age classifications become more specific and targeted. The data show new markets emerging as particular age groups, such as children or older adults, come to be seen as viable target audiences over time. The data continue to show changes in how audiences are constructed by showing how these new markets create new boundaries around these more established markets. Finally, the data show that youth continues to valued over old age and that this is consistent throughout all five decades.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Wang, Rebecca. "Beijing’s Neighborhood‐level Age Composition During Population Aging: Is Age Segregation on the Rise?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1120204_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Population age structure is closely implicated in the functioning of a society’s economic, political and cultural institutions. Particularly at smaller geographic scales, a change in age composition entails a change in demand for important social services related to education and health. Thus, as populations age and the relative proportion of the elderly increases, seniors become a more prominent factor in shaping the social landscape, and describing the spatial location of the elderly relative to other age groups across small geographic areas is necessary for understanding how communities might adapt to this new demographic reality. The following paper investigates neighborhood‐level age structure changes in Beijing from 2000 to 2010. Using sub‐district level census data, I examine (1) how evenly the elderly population is distributed relatively to other age groups; and (2) whether household types, categorized according the number of generations present in the household, are clustered across space. Preliminary analyses indicate the elderly are unevenly scattered across Beijing and most segregated from the youth. Furthermore, there is an emerging pattern of clustering of three-generation households near the center of the city.

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