Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 4,403 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 881 - Next  Jump:
2010 - 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions Words: 495 words || 
Info
1. Omori, Maho. "Medicalisation of ageing: anti-ageing medicine and ageing well. A cultural comparison between Australia and Japan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Komaba I Campus, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, Aug 25, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p420336_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This is a working progress paper of my doctoral research focusing on biomedical technology and ageing. In particular, this research explores the reasons and meanings attached to the usage of anti-ageing medicines or supplements among older adults in Australia and Japan and cultural differences of what it means by ageing well behind its usage.

In the time of rapid population ageing, biomedical technology in the form of anti-ageing medicines/supplements is a widely discussed and applied technological solution to combat ageing. Given the concept of medicalisation of ageing, ageing itself is seen as pathology and good health can be maintained or age-related disease can be prevented or halted through the usage of these medicines (e.g., Vincent 2007). Some research has found the growing popularity of anti-ageing medicines/supplements among older adults both in Australia and Japan (Cardona 2008; Brownie 2005; Ishihara et al. 2003).

In the West, the strong emphasis of individualisation and consumerism may lead older adults to feel a great responsibility for their own health (e.g., Higgs et al. 2009). Cardona (2008) shows that some Australian older adults feel obligated to look after their own health by taking anti-ageing products in order to achieve ideal ageing. This reflects the Australian government policy that promotes successful ageing as keeping independence and autonomy through individual responsibilities (Palth 2009) and implies a bio-political, neo-liberal trend (Asquith 2009; Rose 2001). In this sense, natural ageing is no longer seen as an ideal. Rather, ageing process can be modified through technology as a way to meet social expectation (Turner 2007).

In comparison, irrespective of the growing popularity of anti-ageing supplements in Japan, there is little qualitative research which explores in-depth about why Japanese older adults are willing to take those. I argue that it may not be appropriate to conclude that there is a similar impetus for use of these medicines/supplements in Australia and Japan since the concept of ageing is socially constructed and a social expectation (or even definition) of ageing well varies depending on cultures (e.g., Fox 2005). Contrary to the West, Japanese culture conceivably fosters more of a collective sense of responsibility for ageing (e.g., Traphagan 1999). Traphagan suggests that being responsible in later life for the Japanese elderly means carrying an active role in a reciprocal relationship. This suggests cultural differences in the perceptions of ageing well, which may result in different social circumstances that encourage an intake of anti-ageing medicines/supplements between Australia and Japan.

To explore the aforementioned, this research will conduct qualitative research based on grounded theory: semi-structured face-to-face interviews both in Australia and Japan by the bilingual researcher (the author). It will involve older adults who are healthy and have been taking anti-ageing medicines or supplements with great awareness of their efficacy (i.e. assisting maintaining current good health to obtain ideal ageing). The research findings will contribute to the STS by evaluating the applicability of the western theories such as individualisation, consumerism, bio-politics among others to a non-western context, Japan.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
2. Wang, Rebecca. "Beijing’s Neighborhood‐level Age Composition During Population Aging: Is Age Segregation on the Rise?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1120204_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Population age structure is closely implicated in the functioning of a society’s economic, political and cultural institutions. Particularly at smaller geographic scales, a change in age composition entails a change in demand for important social services related to education and health. Thus, as populations age and the relative proportion of the elderly increases, seniors become a more prominent factor in shaping the social landscape, and describing the spatial location of the elderly relative to other age groups across small geographic areas is necessary for understanding how communities might adapt to this new demographic reality. The following paper investigates neighborhood‐level age structure changes in Beijing from 2000 to 2010. Using sub‐district level census data, I examine (1) how evenly the elderly population is distributed relatively to other age groups; and (2) whether household types, categorized according the number of generations present in the household, are clustered across space. Preliminary analyses indicate the elderly are unevenly scattered across Beijing and most segregated from the youth. Furthermore, there is an emerging pattern of clustering of three-generation households near the center of the city.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 12881 words || 
Info
3. Amenta, Edwin. and Caren, Neal. "Age For Leisure? Political Mediation and The Impact Of The Old-Age Pension Movment On U.S. Old-Age Policy In The 1930S" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p110314_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, we elaborate a political mediation model of the impacts of social movements on states. We appraise this model by way of examining the influence of the U.S. old-age pension movement of the 1930s on two sets of old-age policy outcomes. One involves the development of Old Age Assistance spending in the states in the wake of the 1935 Social Security Act. A second is an analysis of voting for Social Security Act Amendments in the late 1930s. We address the influence of campaigns led by the Townsend Plan, the main national old-age pension organization, as well as a variety of old-age pension organizations at the state level. We employ both quantitative and formal qualitative methods on issues. In the quantitative analyses, we employ control variables regarding influences on social policy, including the influence of public opinion. Both analyses show influence of the old-age pension organizations on policy outcomes and provide support for the political mediation model.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 4894 words || 
Info
4. Barrett, Anne. and Toothman, Erica. "Unpacking Age: The Emotional Consequences of Women’s Midlife Conceptions of Age and Aging" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p565314_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although age is a theoretically complex construct with multiple meanings, studies of age patterns in various social phenomena tend to “unpack” age to a limited degree. They give little attention to individuals’ conceptions of the aging process and own aging experiences, including their intersection with gender inequality. Using a sample of women from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (1995-1996 and 2004-2006), we address this issue by examining the relationship between age and affect using indicators tapping several facets of age and the aging experience, including functional age, personal aging anxieties, subjective age, conceptions of the timing of middle age, views of later life, and experiences of age discrimination. Cross-sectional analyses reveal that older women tend to report lower negative affect and more positive affect than younger women, partly stemming from older women’s more youthful identities. We also find that lower negative affect and more positive affect are associated with reporting more functional limitations, personal aging anxieties about health declines and loss of attractiveness, a more compressed view of the life course, and worse views of later life. Longitudinal analyses indicate that older women report a greater increase in positive affect and smaller increase in negative affect, compared with younger women. Reporting a greater increase in positive affect and smaller increase in negative affect between waves also was associated with having anxiety about health declines. Our study underscores the value of incorporating measures that tap multiple meanings of age and experiences of aging.
Supporting Publications:
Supporting Document

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 28 pages || Words: 7771 words || 
Info
5. Gabbadon, Nadine. "Examining the Industrial Construction of Age: Age Discourse in Advertising Age, 1965-2005" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 22, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p234390_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper examines data from Advertising Age, a well-known trade journal targeted to the advertising industry, to explore how age is discussed from 1965 to 2005. A discourse analysis shows increased market segmentation over the years, as age classifications become more specific and targeted. The data show new markets emerging as particular age groups, such as children or older adults, come to be seen as viable target audiences over time. The data continue to show changes in how audiences are constructed by showing how these new markets create new boundaries around these more established markets. Finally, the data show that youth continues to valued over old age and that this is consistent throughout all five decades.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 881 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy