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2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Liebold, Benny., Pietschmann, Daniel., Zurbrügg, Eva., Schüppel, Vanessa. and Koban, Kevin. "Did the Joker Play Aggressive Video Games? A Two-Wave Cross-Lagged Panel Analysis of the Relation Between Aggressive Video Game Play, Trait Aggressiveness, and Psychopathy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1107640_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: FULL RESEARCH PAPER: Several studies have been presented with the goal to investigate long-term effects of aggressive video game play on aggressive behavior. While many researchers acknowledge that interpersonal differences may play an important role in this relationship, empirical evidence on this topic is scarce. A possible candidate for interindividual differences affecting changes in dispositional aggressiveness as a result of aggressive video game play are psychopathic tendencies, which have been frequently linked to aggressive behavior. A three-month cross-lagged panel study (N=187) was conducted to investigate the role of psychopathic tendencies. Our results suggest a selection effect for aggressive video games, while no socialization effects could be observed. Implications and limitations of our study are discussed.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 499 words || 
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2. Lansford, Jennifer., Sorbring, Emma., Gurdal, Sevtap., Tryggvason, Nina., Godwin, Jennifer., Zelli, Arnaldo., Alampay, Liane., Al-Hassan, Suha., Bacchini, Dario., Bombi, Anna., Bornstein, Marc., Chang, Lei., Deater-Deckard, Kirby., Di Giunta, Laura., Dodge, Kenneth., Malone, Patrick., Oburu, Paul., Pastorelli, Concetta., Skinner, Ann., Tapanya, Sombat. and Uribe Tirado, Liliana. "Physical Aggression, Relational Aggression, and Endorsement of Reactive Aggression in Nine Countries" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p954195_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: The distinction between reactive and proactive aggression is primarily one of function (Coie & Dodge, 1998). That is, an identical behavior such as hitting could serve either a reaction function (such as retaliation against a perceived wrong) or a proactive function (such as obtaining some desired outcome). Nisbett and Cohen (1996) reported that when exposed to provocation by an experimental confederate, male college students from the southern United States were more than twice as likely to experience anger as male college students from the northern United States, and southerners were almost twice as likely to generate an aggressive response to a hypothetical vignette following the provocation compared to northerners. Southerners also were more likely to attribute hostile intent to provocateurs than were northerners. These differences have been attributed to the “culture of honor” in the southern United States that emphasizes respect and heightened motivation to maintain one’s honor. Tests of cultural differences in endorsement of reactive aggression have yet to be extended to diverse international samples. The goal of this study was to examine differences across nine countries in mothers’, fathers’, and children’s beliefs about the appropriateness of reactive aggression and how these beliefs relate to children’s subsequent physically and relationally aggressive behaviors.
The Parenting Across Cultures sample includes 1,417 families in 13 cultural groups in nine countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States). At the time of recruitment, children were 8.28 years, on average; families were interviewed again one year later. Mothers, fathers, and children completed the Normative Beliefs About Aggression scale (Huesmann & Guerra, 1997), which presents brief hypothetical situations (e.g., a boy hits another boy; a girl yells at a boy) and asks whether it is ok for a girl or boy to hit or yell at the other child in return. Children also reported on the frequency with which they engaged in three physically aggressive (e.g., hitting or slapping another child) and three relationally aggressive (e.g., excluding another child from a group) behaviors.
Repeated measures multivariate analyses of variance revealed significant main effects of family member and cultural group and a family member by cultural group interaction on beliefs about the appropriateness of reactive aggression (see Table 1). A series of structural equation models tested relations among beliefs in the appropriateness of reactive aggression and children’s aggressive behavior. Figure 1 depicts a model showing that children’s and mothers’ beliefs about the appropriateness of reactive aggression at Time 1 predicted children’s physical and relational aggression at Time 2, even after controlling for children’s physical and relational aggression at Time 1. Multi-group models comparing the fit of models in which all paths were free to vary across cultural groups with the fit of models in which the structural paths were constrained to be equal revealed some differences across groups. Discussion will focus on similarities and differences across countries in perceptions of the appropriateness of reactive aggression as well as links between these perceptions and children’s physically and relationally aggressive behavior.

2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 7872 words || 
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3. Olson, Loreen., Stevens Aubrey, Jennifer. and Fine, Mark. "Aggressive, Combative, and Aggression-Free: Assessing the Validity of the Relational Control- Motivated Aggression Perspective and Violent Couple Typology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p642339_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of the present study was to test the construct validity of the Relational Control-Motivated Aggression perspective (RCMA) and corresponding four couple types (Olson, 2004) to determine if the theoretical model was an empirically sound way of identifying different types of aggressive couples. Five hundred and ninety-two individuals completed an online survey instrument. In general, results revealed significant relationships in the expected directions between couple types and relational control, power, trait verbal aggressiveness, and relational happiness. The dimensional approach to relational control was also supported and provided an additional mechanism for further discerning patterns across violent couple types. Thus, the findings from this study support many of the basic structures of the RCMA, namely the control dimensions and several couple types. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

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