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2008 - Rural Sociological Society Words: 199 words || 
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1. Odebode, Stella O.. "Use of Participatory Tools in Powering Agricultural Transformation by the Women in Agriculture Unit (WIA) of the Agricultural Development Project in Nigeria" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Rural Sociological Society, Radisson Hotel-Manchester, Manchester, New Hampshire, Jul 28, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p261794_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: The study examined the participatory tools used by the WIA unit of the ADP in powering an Agricultural Transformation in Nigeria. It also assessed the perception of the agricultural extension agents of the WIA unit in the use of these tools. Simple random sampling technique was used to select 60 percent of extension agents in the Women–In-Agriculture unit from three out of the five geo-political zones Nigeria. A total of 120 extension agents were selected. A structured interview schedule was used to elicit information from the respondents and data was analyzed using chi-square and PPMC. Results show that most of WIA extension agents use some participatory tools such as focus group discussion, daily activity charts and in-depth interviews. Sources of information identified by the extension agents include their quarterly meetings, journals, and the internet. The problems encountered by the WIA extension agents include an insufficient number of extension agents to attend to women involved in WIA programmes and language barriers, where interpretation is necessary. It is therefore recommended that extension agents of the WIA unit be trained in the use of participatory tools to enhance the training of women to empower their income-generating capabilities.

2011 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 9391 words || 
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2. Alozie, Emmanuel. "The Role of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in Agriculture: The Way Forward for e-Agriculture in Nigeria" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, May 25, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486369_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study explores Nigeria’s e-agriculture policies and those of other African governments. It also proposes what e-agricultural strategies these governments could adopt to enhance their agricultural output by examining the history of agriculture in Nigeria; the current status of Nigerian information and communication technologies and e-government policies with emphasis on agriculture. The analysis addresses the role of communications as instrument of national development. In view of the economic status of African countries, the study calls on Nigeria and other African governments to adopt a cautious approach as they embark on e-agriculture policies and acquisition of information and communication technologies to promote national development. The study calls on African governments to liberalize their agricultural policies, establish agricultural cooperatives, educate rural famers and offer telecommunication services in the rural areas if they hope to raise their agricultural productivity.

2016 - AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto Words: 228 words || 
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3. Trappel, René. "Reimagining Agriculture, Recreating Urban Bias? The New Socialist Countryside and the Modernization of Agriculture in China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1103785_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Improving incomes and public services for the rural population are key targets of the New Socialist Countryside policy and its successor, the New Urbanization Plan 2014-2020. Both policies include a set of assumptions and ideas on structural changes of the rural economic and administrative system deemed necessary to achieve sustainable welfare improvements. One of these assumptions is that there is a need to replace traditional smallholder farming with modern agriculture based on larger commercial enterprises. As Zheng Hui, the President of the Chinese Agricultural Development Bank, put it in a speech from 2011: "Peasants need to leave behind the land, need to leave behind their peasant status and become employees of big farms. 800 million peasants must change their way of life and their mode of production."
This paper explores the strategic coalition between the central government, local administrations and new agrarian producers in the countryside, as it has emerged following the New Socialist Countryside policies. It argues that central and provincial levels of the administration provide ideological guidance and earmarked funding to county-level governments to promote their vision of a modern agriculture. Local governments, in turn, use this assistance to attract (or create) large investors in agriculture, whereas these investors rely on government assistance in order to secure cheap farmland and labor as well as subsidies. The paper draws on fieldwork in Shandong, Sichuan and Guizhou Province.

2016 - AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto Words: 205 words || 
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4. Kawachi, Satoko. "Diary-Keeping in Modern Agricultural Society: Self-Representation of The Youth in Agricultural Areas" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1104430_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In this presentation, the phenomenon in which keeping the diary was deemed exemplary among the youth in various agricultural areas in modern Japan is discussed from the perspective of sociocultural trends and their backgrounds. While young farmers were encouraged to keep a diary primarily because of it’s pragmatic functions in the agricultural reformation during the Taisho and Showa periods, the youth were also expected to express their own “farmerhood” in terms of self-representation. Such expectation was associated with the social background of the Seikatsu-Tsuzurikata movement that advocated manners of diary-keeping to simply describe the author’s ways of life and routines as they are. Therefore, those engaged in agriculture were increasingly expected to describe their “peasant lives”, which in many ways contrasted the modernized urban cultures. This suggests that diary-keeping in agricultural communities during the period played a role in the development of normative and ideal models of young farmers through their routine descriptions and self-representation as farmers. The aims of this presentation are to reveal the manners of their self-representation as farmers by focusing on the act of diary-keeping among the youth in agricultural society of modern Japan, and to discuss the primary function of diary-keeping, which is the self-imposition of norms as ideal farmers.

2009 - ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE" Words: 41 words || 
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5. Morales-Ortiz, Javier. "Tempering Agricultural Trade Conflicts and the North-South Divide: A Model of Interstate Interaction and Agricultural Trade Liberalization" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE", New York Marriott Marquis, NEW YORK CITY, NY, USA, Feb 15, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p311818_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The findings of the broad body of work on interstate disputes reinforce the assumption that conflict and cooperation occurring between pairs of states is a time-dependent process that varies depending on the type of issue that is involved in a particular

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