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2013 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 9671 words || 
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1. Alhabash, Saleem., Oh, Hyun Jung., Yang, Jing. and Cole, Richard T.. "Alcohol, Sex, ‘n’ Text Messaging: Effects of Pro-Alcohol and Anti-Alcohol Display Ads on Evaluations of Texts From Last Night Facebook Updates and Drinking Intentions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC, Aug 08, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p670800_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: An experiment (N = 413) investigated the effects of Facebook status updates paired with display ads on evaluations, viral behavioral intentions, and intentions to consume alcohol. Participants saw status updates, both alcohol- and sex-related, posted on the Facebook page of Texts From Last Night (TFLN) paired with display ads that either featured an alcohol brand, an anti-binge drinking PSA, or a local bank. Findings showed that participants rated status updates and display ads variably as a function of the display ad type. Additionally, intentions to consume alcohol were significantly predicted by viral behavioral intentions toward status updates and display ads, and varied as a function of the combination of status update type and display ad type. Findings are discussed in relation to the effect of alcohol marketing via social media.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 498 words || 
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2. Whitaker, Lydia., Brown, Stephen., Qualter, Pamela., Young, Bridget. and Coyne, Sarah. "Script Representations of Alcohol-Related Aggression in 11-16 Year-Old Alcohol-Naïve Adolescents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p957350_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Objectives
We examined the idea that adolescents who are naïve to alcohol use are susceptible to alcohol-related aggression in a laboratory task because they have learnt to associate alcohol and aggression through cultural and social media. Adopting script theory we examined quantitative links between alcohol-related aggression and aggressive content in participants’ responses to ambiguous story stubs concerning alcohol use (Study One). We also examined qualitative accounts of alcohol-related aggression in alcohol-naïve adolescents (Study Two).

A social script is a widely shared representation of social behaviour considered to be socially appropriate or rewarding, which is learned through social, cultural and media cues. Previous research shows extra-pharmacological influences of alcohol on aggression; priming with alcohol related stimuli caused adults to make more hostile attributions in a laboratory task, suggesting that social and cultural factors influence alcohol-related aggression. However, these are difficult to isolate from experiential learning in a drinker sample. If associations between alcohol and aggression are present in alcohol-naïve samples, we eliminate the effects of experiential learning. Thus, we can assert that some foundations of alcohol related aggression are inculcated at an early age.

Method and Results
In Study One internalised representations of scripts were examined using a neutral story stub task. 104 adolescents (age range 11-to-14 years, 39 males and 65 females) were instructed to imagine and record events during a night out. Aggressive content was recorded. Following an alcoholic or non-alcoholic beverage prime, aggression was also assessed using the Taylor Competitive Reaction Time Task and Alcohol-related aggression was assessed by differences between alcohol-primed and non-alcohol primed aggression. The number of aggressive events reported by adolescents predicted alcohol-related aggression on the competitive reaction time task.

In Study Two, a series of focus groups examined how 16 adolescents (age range 14-to-16 years, 8 males and 8 females) perceived alcohol-related aggression and the sources of their beliefs and understandings. Qualitative analyses indicated that adolescents perceived engineered reality TV programs, which depicted and followed groups of young people drinking alcohol in public spaces, as possible facilitators in the formulation of alcohol-related aggression scripts. These TV programs depicted and discussed young people engaging in antisocial behaviours while intoxicated. Gender specific peer group pressure, in which groups of male friends reported a sense of competitiveness (‘a test’) to engage in aggressive behaviours, as well as a sense of duty to protect members of their group subject to aggression from group outsiders, were perceived as possible constructs within a developing alcohol-related aggression script.

Conclusions
These findings suggest that common social representations of alcohol use and aggression are learned by young people before they engage in drinking. These widely shared representations of social behaviour may contribute to alcohol-related aggression. If so, prevention of alcohol-related aggression may involve intervention at both sociocultural and individual levels and targeting of younger age groups than previously considered. Future research will adopt a prospective design where we will be able to assess firstly, the developmental pathway whereby socially-learned scripts become internalised, and, secondly, how internalised representations influence individuals' behaviour.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
3. Hall, Greg. and Kappel, Robert. "Gender, Alcohol, and The Media: The Portrayal of Ideal Men and Women in Alcohol Commercials" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1255128_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper we focus on alcohol commercials in the media as they have a heavy influence on behaviors and the formation of gender identities (Towns, Parker, and Chase 2012). This paper seeks to reevaluate and extended ideal types used to define gendered behaviors in alcohol commercials. Through an analysis of 77 alcohol commercials out of an available 12,195 time slots we find that alcohol advertisements portray deeply gender specific messages about social life through the following ideal types: hotties, bitches, losers, buddies, 007, the prop, party girl, and the worker. These ideal types define and reinforce stereotypical notions of gender and gender roles.

2010 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 1628 words || 
Info
4. Sthapitanonda, Parichart. and Sinsuwarn, Natwipa. "The Alcohol Communications War: “Communications” Versus “Symbolic Meaning” in Relation to Alcohol Consumption" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore, Jun 22, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p403073_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study, ‘The Alcohol Communications War: “Communications” versus “Symbolism” in relation to alcohol consumption’ was conducted between 2006 and 2007 through the examination of articles and documents concerning alcohol beverage consumption. The objectives of this research were to survey and compare the presentation of important symbols that relate to alcohol consumption constructed by the alcohol beverage industry and the Anti-alcohol consumption groups in Thailand. Results found that both sides gave importance to constructing symbolic meanings for the consumption of alcohol based on seven key factors: happiness/fun, accidents, violence, social economic status, role model, organizational responsibility, and interpretations of relevant laws and regulations.

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