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2003 - American Political Science Association Pages: 55 pages || Words: 15649 words || 
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1. Page, Benjamin. ""Go it Alone" Won't Go with the American Public" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia Marriott Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p62662_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Benjamin I. Page and Dukhong Kim
“‘Go it Alone’ Won’t Go with the American Public”

Recent U.S. foreign policy has widely been seen as having a unilateralist, “go it alone” tendency. Three decades worth of national surveys by the Chicago Council on Foreign Relations, supplemented by other survey data gathered since the invasion of Iraq, indicate that large majorities of ordinary Americans prefer quite a different foreign policy: one that relies chiefly on cooperative, multilateral, and diplomatic methods.
Majorities of citizens favor cooperation and joint decision making with allies, especially European countries; having widespread diplomatic relations, even with official enemy states like Iran and Cuba; pursuing diplomatic methods (as well as, and perhaps in preference to, military methods) in the struggle against terrorism; and dealing even-handedly with Israel and the Palestinians, including establishing a Palestinian state. Most Americans hold the United Nations in very high esteem and favor strengthening it by a variety of means, including a standing UN peacekeeping force and a small direct tax on international transactions. Most favor a strong UN role in the reconstruction of Iraq. Most Americans back a number of international treaties and agreements that have been rejected by U.S. officials, including the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, the treaty to ban land mines, the Kyoto agreement on global warming, and the International Criminal Court.
The public’s preferences for cooperative policies have generally been quite stable over time. They tend to fit together coherently in support of what can be called “global governance,” in which a network of international treaties and institutions are used to encourage the collective provision of global public goods. At the individual level, these preferences tend to reflect “purposive belief systems” in which people’s policy preferences are linked to logically related goals and perceptions of threats.
The concluding section of the paper asks how the foreign policy of a democratic country could get out of harmony with the wishes of its citizens. It suggests that the reasons may lie in non-democratic features of U.S. elections, including the crucial roles of political party activists and money givers; the relatively low salience of some of these foreign policy issues; the success of public officials’ rhetoric at persuading citizens that their wishes are not in fact being flouted; and the willingness of many citizens to acquiesce in policies they dislike, unless and until major negative results begin to appear.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 6223 words || 
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2. Park, Sangyoub. "From Bowling Alone To Lattes Together: A Reinvestigation of the Alleged Decline of Social Capital in the U.S." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p104570_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Why there is confounding evidence concerning trends in American social capital? Partly it is because the link between the theoretical definition of social capital and its measurement is tenuous. In this study I develop a new measure of social capital, which is consistent with its theoretical definition. The new measure of social capital includes four dimensions. This research reinvestigates trends in social capital in American society. I examine trends in four dimensions of social capital, respectively. I explore the overall social capital trend (i.e., the combination of four dimensions). Further, I investigate trends in social capital by different sets of cohorts: GI Generation, Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, and Generation X and Beyond. For the analysis, data from the General Social Survey between 1972 and 2002 was employed. Structural equation modeling confirms that social capital contain four dimensions: trust in individuals, trust in institutions, social connectedness, and social tolerance. The findings suggest that four components of social capital show different trends. More importantly, unlike widespread belief of declining social capital, the overall social capital pattern indicates a sign of improvement and younger generations are not consumers of social capital. Finally, I propose an alternative explanation, Lattes Together, why social capital is not declining in the U.S.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 30 pages || Words: 8075 words || 
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3. van den Putte, Bas., Yzer, Marcus. and Brunsting, Suzanne. "A smoker is never alone: Test of a typology of social influences on smoking cessation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113174_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The operationalization of social influence in the theory of planned behavior is very limited. Only the perception is measured whether important others would approve or disapprove it if a person performs a certain behavior. However, more types of social influence can be discerned and it is hypothesized that the conceptualization of the social factor should be broadened. A typology of social influences on smoking cessation is outlined and is tested on 2,703 Dutch smokers. This study shows that several social factors influence the intention to quit smoking. These effects are not completely mediated by the variables of the theory of planned behavior. The consequences for health campaign strategies are described. Most likely, the same holds for other behaviors as well, but the relative importance of the various social influences varies dependent on the behavior and population under study.

2004 - International Studies Association Pages: 18 pages || Words: 8553 words || 
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4. Jesse, Neal. "Choosing to go it alone: Neutrality as a foreign policy in response to the hegemon" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p72844_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Much of the literature in international relations and comparative politics focuses on the foreign policies of states that support or challenge the hegemon directly, and yet some states have chosen to follow a neutral foreign policy. This paper examines the domestic sources of neutrality as a foreign policy, looking at the case of the Republic of Ireland in the Cold War and post-Cold War period.

2005 - International Studies Association Pages: 35 pages || Words: 9613 words || 
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5. Gizelis, Ismene. "Wealth Alone Does Not Buy Health: Relative political capacity, Democracy, and the Spread of AIDS" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p72014_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: ABSTRACT:
Despite the numerous studies and reports on deaths due to AIDS, its epidemiological features, and its relationship to poverty and development, few studies to date have systematically analyzed how political factors and policies may help curtail the spread of AIDS. In this paper, I consider how a variety of domestic factors influence HIV infection rates across countries. I argue that states with higher relative political capacity tend to slow down the spread of HIV/AIDS epi-demic. Moreover, I argue that democracies tend to be more responsive to the needs of the popu-lation and can be more efficient in curtailing the spread of HIV/AIDS. I empirically evaluate the hypotheses using a cross-sectional time-series sample of 117 countries. The results indicate that greater relative political capacity can help curtail HIV/AIDS infection rates. Evidence also sug-gests that foreign aid can assist countries to battle new outbreaks of AIDS.

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