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2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Foley, Benjamin. "Teach for (which) America? The Politics of the Moral Discourse of Teach for America" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1252959_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the politics of the moral discourse associated with Teach for America (TFA). TFA is a nonprofit organization that recruits and trains non-education majoring college graduates, or “corps members,” to teach at schools in low income communities in the United States for two years. There is no evidence that TFA is more successful at raising student test scores than traditionally trained career teachers. Instead it provides a steady stream of inexperienced corps members who regularly perform worse than more experienced teachers. Yet, prominent professional schools and corporations place high value on TFA experience. They regularly offer deferments and recruit former corps members to fill their ranks. Thus, TFA has become a program that effectively benefits corps members more than the students it purportedly aims to help. I argue that the moral discourse used in the claiming and conferring of the value of TFA experience permits this to happen. First, the value of TFA experience is framed exclusively in terms of what it represents about corps members as ethical subjects rather than on the success of the program itself. Second, the value of TFA experience only benefits corps members when they leave the classroom. This ensures that TFA continually provides novice, and therefore less effective teachers to the schools it serves. I argue, therefore, that the moral discourse used to claim the value of TFA experience reproduces the conditions that permit TFA to benefit corps members but not the disadvantaged students in the low income schools.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 11660 words || 
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2. Ollion, Etienne. and Abbott, Andrew. "America! America? The Appropriations of French Sociology in the USA (1970 - 2009)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1009082_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper analyses the appropriations of French sociologists in the USA over the last four decades. It demonstrates that it this presence is dual, with a small minority receiving intense scrutiny while the vast majority is largely ignored. It also shows that the use of the work by French sociologists is highly selective. When cited in the USA, these authors are mobilized as social theorists. We then proceed to account for this reception. To do so, we investigate three particular aspects: the intellectual structures of both fields, the local logics in the receiving field, and the multiple lives of an author. Primarily based on bibliometric data collected on 35 important US journals, the paper offers an empirical assessment of the merits and limitations of automated data analysis techniques in times of renewed interest for these sources and methods.

2006 - American Studies Association Words: 498 words || 
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3. Yeh, Chiou-Ling. "Making Multicultural America: Cold War Politics, Ethnic Celebrations, and Chinese America" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113945_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: When Communist China entered the Korean War and engaged American troops in 1950, Chinese Americans became targets of anti-Communist hysteria. In 1953, the Chinese American community in San Francisco staged the first modern Chinese New Year Festival to defuse political persecution and mitigate the business downturn that accompanied the American embargo against China. The festival’s organizing committee proclaimed that the ethnic celebration was a way to fight Communist China -- wrongly accusing the Communist regime of eliminating many traditions, including the Chinese New Year. Moreover, the committee claimed that the festival defended American democratic practices because it was a demonstration of cultural diversity. In subsequent years, the organizing committee continued to situate the ethnic festival within the Cold War context and to insist on its right to preserve ethnic traditions.

Scholars have assumed that contemporary multiculturalism emerged in the 1970s, as a product of the civil rights movement. This paper, however, argues that in complex ways, Cold War politics helped to foster an early version of multiculturalism in the 1950s, one that took shape in the presentation of the New Year Festival. The paper builds on the work of scholars such as Elaine Tyler May and Mary Dudziak, who link U.S. Cold War foreign polices to domestic cultures, and extends their argument to the realm of multiculturalism. Using community and mainstream newspapers, festival publications, and oral history interviews, the paper traces how Chinese American leaders in 1953 and after positioned the festival as a vehicle for fighting the Cold War. They drew on Cold War rhetoric to equate freedom and democracy with the continuation of ethnic diversity. In their view, the festival represented a claim that American democracy allowed Chinese and European Americans alike the right to retain their ethnic heritages, putting those heritages on an equal footing. This bid for equal recognition, manifested in organizers’ rhetoric and the performance of the festival itself, anticipated later multiculturalism’s embrace of a pluralism founded on a recognition of non-European groups.

Significantly, the Chinese American leadership’s pluralist understanding reached and, at times, resonated with a set of non-Chinese American audiences. These included not just the tens of thousands of European Americans who attended the festival in the 1950s, but also San Francisco’s city government and the U.S. State Department. The city sought to market the festival to generate tourism. The State Department saw the celebration as an opportunity to publicize domestic racial equality in order to defuse criticism from the People’s Republic of China of the discrepancy between democratic ideology and the actual practice of race relations in the United States. Paradoxically, conservative Cold War politics intersected with the ambitions of festival organizers and the needs of the Chinese American community to create a public rhetoric of pluralism, one bearing a striking resemblance to the multiculturalism that would arise nearly two decades later on the left.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 8828 words || 
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4. Pearson, Jacob. "Commies, Khrushchev and Captain America: The Cold War according to Captain America, Commie Smasher!" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p365935_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In comparison with other decades in the 20th century, the popular culture texts of the 1950s have been relatively overlooked in terms of academic scrutiny. This paper attempts to understand how the ultra-patriotic World War II era super hero Captain America was adapted to conform to the ideology of 1950s McCarthy America, and how this conformity to the dominant hegemony ultimately backfired, causing Captain America, Commie Smasher! to become a commercial failure.

2010 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 220 words || 
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5. Dotter, Anne. "America Pro Forma: Performing America in Translation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, San Antonio, TX, <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p417567_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: Whether before or after the world's financial crisis, the twenty-first century, more than any other, is characterized by an increasingly faster flow of objects, ideas, images and people, whose identities are the fruit of a never-ending process of negotiations across space and place; that is, they are in constant change, they are in translation. One such locus of translation is the promotional artifact for Hollywood films in France: far from imposing American culture on Europe, film distributors throughout Europe translate posters and trailers linguistically and culturally. In the process, much is gained but in this cross-cultural calculus, much has been adapted of the US message once believed to be dominant and all-pervasive. The purpose of this paper is to uncover US film distribution companies' vested interests in the performance of translated US identities; to this end, I will focus on the promotion of teen-girl films with African-American protagonists or culture from Bring it on! (Peyton Reed, 2000) to Step Up 2 (Jon Chu, 2008). Beyond the necessary acknowledgement that pro forma visions of US cultures is all there is once the national territory's borders are crossed, these cross-cultural negotiations also reveal France's own identity crisis: what room is there, within a desired homogenous whole (a pro forma France), for black performances in which much has been invested?

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