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2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 5354 words || 
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1. Ray, Rashawn. "To Be A Man: An Investigation of Masculinity Ideology and Men's Family Roles Among and Within African-American, Anglo-American, and Mexican-American Families" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p20261_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study examines African-American, Anglo-American, and Mexican-American attitudes toward masculinity ideology and the role of men in the family. Much research focuses on the impact various aspects of the family have on mental health outcomes and gender attitude differences amongst men and women, but little research investigates how the roles men are perceived to fulfill differ among and within racial/ethnic groups by assessing each racial/ethnic group for its specific culture and history. Comparatively, little research has been conducted on the gender role attitudes of minorities and economically disadvantaged individuals. There is not much literature on African-American men in the family and even less on Hispanic men, more specifically Mexican-American men. This study aims to fill these gaps in the literature by investigating attitudinal differences that vary across African-American, Anglo-American, and Mexican-American families in terms of attitudes towards three specific areas of masculinity: self-reliance, restrictive emotionality, and achievement status using quantitative and qualitative data from The Intersections of Family, Work, and Health Study (2004). This focus on masculinity ideology and the expected roles of men in the family will provide a broader context for understanding how to better assess attitudes towards masculinity ideology for racial/ethnic groups.

2010 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 28 words || 
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2. Devaney, Joseph. "“American Conventionalism: How the Bill of Rights and American Constitutionalism Reveal the Unexceptional and Traditional Nature of the American Founding."" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p439406_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The author of this paper, Dr. Joseph Devaney, has submitted his proposal and abstract separately; however, he intends to serve on this panel as a presenter and discussant.

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 45 pages || Words: 11069 words || 
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3. Gates, Denise. "Superior-Subordinate Dialogue Among African American, Caucasian American, and Latino/a American Subordinates: Benefits of Being Buddies with the Boss" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p15216_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study presented one of the salient themes which emerged from the lived experiences of the women and men during their reflections, as subordinates, on their dialogue with their supervisors. The findings indicated that the subordinates in this study categorized their relationships with their supervisors as friendships, non-friendships/professionals, or family. Subordinates who reported being friends with their bosses, most often Caucasian Americans, seemed also to indicate having more rewarding superior-subordinate interactions. These relationships with their bosses opened other doors for them in there respective companies. Subordinates seeking or being afforded only non-friend/professional relationships with their bosses seemed to enjoy fewer professional favors or privileges than their counterparts. African American women, more so than other groups, tended to reveal having only professional relationships with their supervisors. Additionally, Latino/a American subordinates often had friendships with their bosses but many maintained that the likelihood or the quality of these friendships varied across races. The subordinates in this study who reported to family members were Caucasian American, and they appeared to have more genuine and personal dialogue with their supervisors than other groups.

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Pages: 25 pages || Words: 11688 words || 
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4. Anastasiou, Harry. "A Conflict Analysis and Peace Studies Perspective on American Nationalism and US Foreign Policy: The Narrative of American Nationalism versus American Democracy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p501320_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The uniqueness of American nationalism as a critical factor shaping US policy has received scant attention. Even though nationalist themes often surface in academic and public political discourse, the phenomenon of nationalism as a worldview underpinning and driving much of US politics has not been sufficiently attended. More specifically, the impact of American nationalism on foreign policy perspectives, especially in regard to issues of international peace and security, has not been sufficiently addressed. What has also received insufficient attention is that within America’s political and intellectual tradition one also finds an alternative worldview that challenges and competes with that of nationalism, namely, the worldview of peace-grounded democracy. From the perspective of conflict analysis and peace studies, the purpose of this paper is to initiate academic inquiry and practical dialogue on the fundamental parameters of the contradiction and competition between the worldview of American nationalism and that of American peace-oriented democracy, while exploring their implications for US foreign policy, relations with the international community, America’s perspectives on its current wars and warfare in general, and its approaches to securing international peace and promoting democracy. The inquiry will conclude with a comparative exposition and assessment of the worldview of American nationalism and that of American peace-oriented democracy.

2011 - 96th Annual Convention Words: 324 words || 
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5. Jordan, Joseph. "African American - Native American Civil War Representations in American Film" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA, <Not Available>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p522151_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: This essay examines the cultural politics of race and history as depicted through African Americans and Native Americans in filmic narratives of the Civil War. I begin from a basic assertion that filmic narratives, particularly those that are based on or purport to accurately depict historical moments or events, are indelibly marked by the socio-political conflicts (contestations of meaning and interpretation) of the era in which they were made.

My analytical approach entails: (1) examining the historical accuracy of films from different eras that focus on the Civil War and its immediate aftermath; (2) exploring how these films conceptualize African American and Native American group consciousness and agency as they grapple with the conditions imposed by the Civil War; and (3) documenting the manner in which these films create authoritative texts that approximate contextualized historical truths. Films analyzed in this essay include: Thomas Ince's The Invaders (1912); Alf Kjellin's The McMasters (1970); Sidney Poitier's Buck and the Preacher (1972); Clint Eastwood's Unforgiven (1992); and the History Channel's production of the documentary Indian Warriors: The Untold Story of the Civil War (2007).

My reading of the films draws on the work of Quintard Taylor, Jack Forbes, Walter Benjamin and Arica Coleman, and on primary text material on the Civil War in Indian country and in the American south. In working through this reading I follow Benjamin's query, which asks "... whether films can overcome the gap between fantasy and reality." I argue it should not be necessary for filmic narratives to accomplish this task, but acknowledge, as Benjamin did, that films can be "... associated with a new form of experience that enters one’s consciousness despite one’s will". I conclude the filmic narratives explored in this essay can be useful 'texts', that are capable of providing greater insight into the cultural politics of history in a specific era. However, they are less useful as 'historical texts', even when a documentary format is employed to tell the story.

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