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2007 - WESTERN POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION Pages: 44 pages || Words: 12850 words || 
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1. Tauber, Steven. "The Impact of Animal Welfare Litigation on Animal Law Case Outcomes and Public Attention to Animal Liberation Issues" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the WESTERN POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION, La Riviera Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada, Mar 08, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p176564_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: ABSTRACT
There has been considerable research on the extent that disadvantaged groups have used litigation to reduce mistreatment and establish rights, but virtually all that scholarship has been confined to human groups. However, since the 1970s, there has been a rise in interest groups that use litigation to bring about better treatment of non-human animals. Although legal scholarship has increasingly acknowledged the distinctive field of animal law and recognized animal litigating organizations’ impact on shaping animal law, there has been minimal scholarship that empirically tests the extent that organized animal activist litigation influences the outcome of animal law cases and generates public attention to the plight of animals. Moreover, since extant animal law research emphasizes legal doctrine, scholars have not addressed political explanations of the effectiveness of animal litigation. This paper seeks to fill this gap in the literature by testing whether animal organizations’ litigation increases the chance of a judicial decision favoring animal interests, and it investigates whether animal litigation increases media attention to animal liberation issues. This research reports the analysis of two sets of data the author collected on animal litigation. The results demonstrate that animal litigating groups do not exert a significant impact on the outcome of animal law cases, but there is some evidence that organized animal litigation creates increased media attention to the animal liberation movement and a vegetarian lifestyle. Since this research is in its early stages, this paper concludes with a discussion of further research on animal litigation.

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 207 words || 
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2. Sollund, Ragnhild. "Animal Trafficking and Trade: Animal Abuse and Species Decline" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p515958_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Illegal poaching, trafficking and trade in animals is claimed to be the second largest illegal trade worldwide and increasing. Animals are abducted from their habitats and transported over long distance, alive or dead cut into parts: for the pet industry, as collector items or for medicine. Trade threatens large numbers of species, e.g. 1/3 of all parrot species, and involves serious animal abuse and death, both during capture and transport; 75% of all parrots that are trafficked for the pet market die. The CITES convention aims to protect animals from trafficking, but only when threatened with extinction. Does CITES really protect the species that are subject to trade? I will discuss the trade and trafficking in animals in terms of speciesism – the belief in humans’ superiority and priority over other species. How can animal trade be understood in terms of ecological justice ? Is trade and trafficking in animals acceptable or is the only way to avoid the extensive animal abuse connected to the trade and species decline a total ban? How is the wildlife trade controlled by police and customs in Norway, what are the difficulties in law enforcement and the motives of offenders buying individuals of ‘illegal’ species?

2011 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 498 words || 
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3. Fielder, Brigitte. "Animal Humanism: Abolitionists and Animals in the American Nineteenth Century" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD, Oct 20, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p509203_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Nineteenth-century discourses of race and slavery are often articulated around differences between the animal and the human. The ideology of chattel slavery depends upon a theorization of racial difference akin to speciesism, marking the racial Other as evolutionarily difference in extreme forms such as polygenesis theory, or positing “interracial” mixture as creating hybrid species in theories of “amalgamation” or “miscegenation.” The rhetoric of scientific racism and racial separatism show us why humanist arguments become necessary to re-frame ideologies of racial difference. Abolitionist texts often evoke the animal to articulate humanist arguments about race, emphasizing the categorical difference between the slave and the animal. But even as discussions of the humanity of blacks served as arguments against slavery, other abolitionist arguments employed the animal as a point of familiar reference, in cross-species comparisons meant to garner sympathy for enslaved people. This paper examines the rhetoric of differently-humanist uses of the animal in abolitionist literature.
The Lamplighter Picture Book (1855) is a revision of Maria Susanna Cummings’ The Lamplighter (1854), reframed for a younger audience and re-oriented towards an anti-slavery cause. Composed of poetry interspersed with segments of Cummins’ original story, the text is clearly meant to rally abolitionist sentiment in its young readers. The story of Gerty’s kitten is re-written in abolitionist terms, as the cat is compared both to Gerty herself and to the fugitive slave. Gerty’s initial sympathy for the cats she encounters, who “often hid themselves among the wood and coal, seeming to feel, as she did, great doubts about their having a right to be anywhere,” is posed here as shared identification. When Gerty decides to keep the kitten, even though she knows she will have to struggle to feed it and hide it from her guardian, we read that “. . . thus good people often give/The fugitive a lodging.” Thus, identification with the cat mediates Gerty’s sympathy for the fugitive slave through her more familiar sympathy with animals.
Animal-mediated humanism is the subject of my inquiry for this paper. As abolitionist and anti-abolitionist arguments about the nature of racial difference rely on similar ideologies that position the racial Other somewhere between (white)humans and the figure of the animal, this animal-mediated humanism dangerously reinscribes the philosophy of racial separatism. If sympathy is more easily conducted through species than through race, what are its limits? I aim to explore these limits in a discussion of the scientific racism concerned with marking out the pre-human, traditionally humanist antiracist arguments, the interchangeability of race and species in discourses of Otherness and familiarity, and the possibility of historicizing posthumanism in rhetorics of antiracism-as-antispeciesism. The cat-slave comparison in The Lamplighter Picture Book is not anomalous, but might be contextualized against counter-examples of “raced” animals, in readings of the black-cat-as-black-man in Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Black Cat” (1843) and Jesse Healy’s Othello, A Tale of a Cat (1876), which simultaneously displace and evoke race in their animal narratives. My paper opens up this discussion by exploring these animal-humanism connections in abolitionist literature.

2013 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 147 words || 
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4. Sahlins, Peter. "Where the Sun Don't Shine: Animals and Animality in the Royal Labyrinth, 1660–74" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Sheraton Hotel and Marina, San Diego, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p601812_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The Royal Labyrinth in the gardens of Versailles contained some three dozen fountain sculptures (drawn from Aesop’s fables) with over 350 painted lead animal figures (modeled on those of the recently-founded Royal Menagerie). I argue that the use of sculpted animals in violent, realistic interactions stood in marked contrast to both the Royal Menagerie and the decorative politics of the Versailles gardens, which drew on mythological and metamorphosed animals and beings. The royal message of the animal fables in the Labyrinth can be found in its portrayal of a "realistic" world of nature in which warfare and violence (especially among birds) was the norm. Only the presence of the king could guarantee the social order and control the "animal passions" of the king's subjects. The Labyrinth thus demonstrated a new use of animals and of fables in the making of the French absolute monarchy.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Greenberg, Raz. "The Animation of Gamers and Gamers as Animators in the Sierra Online Graphic Adventures" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1100458_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper aims at re-defining the interaction between gamers and the computer/video games they play, an interaction that formed during the 1980s in the computer games released by the American company Sierra On-Line. This interaction continue to exist in many current computer/video games, providing gamers with a great amount of control over the characters they play and the games' interactive environment, in many ways bypassing the game designers' original intentions for the "right" way in which they intended their games to be played: the interaction between animators and animated characters and environments.

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