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Showing 1 through 5 of 254 records.
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2010 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 10621 words || 
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1. Burnham, Lola. and Freivogel, William. "The Anonymous Poster: Today's Hybrid of the Anonymous Pamphleteer and Anonymous Source?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, The Denver Sheraton, Denver, CO, Aug 04, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p434435_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Editors and judges face novel questions about how to treat anonymous posters to news sites. Is the anonymous poster more like the anonymous pamphleteer or anonymous source? Some judges have provided posters with as much or more protection than sources. Yet anonymous sources are more deserving of protection than posters. Newspapers vet anonymous sources, know their identity and know they possess authoritative information. Newspapers risk current legal protections by equating posters with sources.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Hong, Cheng. and Li, Cong. "The Effect of “Anonymous Consumer”: A Study of Anonymity, Affect Intensity and Message Valence in the Cyberspace" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1107081_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study aims to illustrate how anonymity, together with affect intensity and message valence, impacts message receivers’ responses. A 2 (anonymous vs. revealed identity) × 2 (low vs. high affect intensity) × 2 (positive vs. negative valence) between-subjects experiment was conducted. In align with language expectancy theory, it is found that when the message sender is anonymous, a message with low affect intensity is more effective than a message with high affect intensity in terms of perceived message credibility and message processing depth; when the message sender’s identity is revealed, a message with high affect intensity is found more effective. Moreover, a significant interaction effect between affect intensity and message valence is also found on message processing depth. When affect intensity is low, a negative message elicits deeper processing than a positive message; when affect intensity is high, a positive message elicits more message processing.

2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Sharon, Tzlil. "Networked Anonymity: What Users of ‘Secret’ Can Teach Us About Anonymity in the Age of Social Media" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1364717_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper investigates how anonymity is perceived and experienced in the age of social media. While much has been written on anonymity in the early days of the internet, this study focusses on the experiences and practices of anonymous communication with friends, enabled by tie-based anonymous apps. Based on qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews with users of the application Secret, the paper emphasizes the strategies deployed by interviewees in order to de-anonymize other users, placing them within the broader context of the real-name web. The central argument is that Secret was not only based on pre-existing social networks, but also drew on the network as a structure of thought. The concept of networked anonymity is introduced to account for the ways that anonymous actors imagine one another as ‘someone’, rather than as an unknown ‘anyone’. This model of anonymity invites the reconstruction of identities and ties around a networked self.

2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
4. Kang, Katie. "(De)Constituting Alcoholics Anonymous: The Four-Flows of Anonymous Communication" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1361888_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Despite the potential attractiveness of these social support groups for stigmatized individuals, less is known about how these support organizations achieve desired outcome via supportive interactions—even though we know that communication generally plays a pivotal role for successful supportive interaction in such groups. To promote supportive interactions among stigmatized individuals, anonymity may be desirable (Marx, 1999). Despite its positive outcomes, the role of anonymity as a core communication principle has not been fully studied in the context of support groups and organizations.Therefore, this study aims to understand how anonymity enables and constrains the key processes and outcomes in support organizations generally, and those dealing with substance abuse and addiction specifically.

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