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Showing 1 through 5 of 311 records.
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2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 110 words || 
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1. Stewart, Cindy. and Luskin, Mary Lee. "Crisis Intervention Training: Have We Answered and Can We Answer the Central Questions?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p514635_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Although crisis intervention training as a means of improving police officers’ responses to mentally ill persons and of reducing their inappropriate involvement in the criminal justice system has been in existence for more than 20 years, empirical evidence on the effectiveness of its central tenets is limited. The reasons for this dearth lie partly in the variation in the model and its implementation, but mostly in the challenges the program presents to the development and execution of rigorous research designs. This paper reviews the methodologies and findings of current research and considers what questions might be addressed by what designs and what questions may be, in practice, unanswerable.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 1 words || 
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2. Bush, Gail. "Answer the Question, Question the Answer: The Role of 21st Century School Libraries" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p371647_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 7654 words || 
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3. Williamson, John. "Notional Defined Contribution Accounts: Are They Part of the Answer to China's Social Security Problems?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p108016_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Most public old-age pension schemes around the world are based on the pay-as-you-go defined benefit (PAYGO DB) model. As these schemes have matured and some of the limitations of this model have become more salient, pension experts have begun considering alternative models. The notional defined contribution (NDC) model has emerged as one of the major new models. This paper has three goals: (1) to provide a brief history of pension policy in China, (2) to describe the core elements of the NDC model, and (3) to assess the relative merits of the NDC alternative as a possible option for China. For China the NDC's mechanisms for dealing with population aging and regional differences in wage levels would be definite strengths, particularly in light of the projected consequences of the nation's one child policy. The transparency of the NDC model would be advantageous given China's corruption problems and the de facto partial default in connection with the prior enterprise based pay-as-you-go defined benefit scheme. The NDC model provides an incentive for workers to remain in the labor force longer which would help alleviate the nation's projected dependency burden, but at the cost of exacerbating another problem, the high unemployment rates among young workers. The fear that the NDC model might contribute to higher unemployment rates among younger worker indirectly contributing to labor unrest and political instability could by itself make the model politically unacceptable to Chinese policy makers.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 5945 words || 
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4. Strasser, Hermann. "Force Is Not an Answer: On Deviant Behavior of Young Russian-German Immigrants in Germany" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p109051_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper discusses conditions favoring the use of force by young Russian-Germans from the former Soviet Union after their migration to Germany. The authors focus on the question of what kind of influences these young people‘s understanding of honor and the functions of the police has on their attitude toward force and their use of it. In addition to a presentation of the state of the art on prevalence as well as the motives of the use of force, they refer to their own empirical study of young Russian-Germans in the cities of Duisburg and Frankfurt/M., Germany. Under the conditions of great language deficits as well as bad educational and occupational opportunities, the concept of honor based upon a traditional ideal of masculinity turns out to be an effective means of social control which guides the actions of these young people to a considerable extent.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 4858 words || 
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5. Lloyd, Donald. "Who Becomes Alcoholic versus Drug Dependent? Exploring Social Answers among Diverse Young Adults" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p21428_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Stress has been implicated in the development of substance dependence, possibly as a consequence of maladaptive coping behavior. This relationship was previously examined separately with respect to drugs and alcohol using a representative sample of nearly 1800 community residing young adults (most aged 19-21) in South Florida. The relationship between level of lifetime exposure to adverse experiences and the initial onset of both alcohol and drug dependence consisted of independent effects stress measured both distally and proximally. This pattern of relationship held in the context of controls for prior psychiatric disorders, AD/HD and conduct disorder, as well as gender, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status and time. While stress was shown to be an important predictor of drug and alcohol dependence disorder, variation in stress exposure failed to explain social group differences in either type of dependence. The observed statistical patterns were the same for alcohol and drug dependence, but most of the affected individuals were different people in the two analyses. This paper explores whether finding the same pattern of relationship with respect to different substance dependencies is redundant, or whether the largely independent manifestation of alcohol and drug dependence in different stress-exposed individuals has sociologically significant meaning.

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