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2004 - International Studies Association Words: 491 words || 
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1. Clunan, Anne. "Status Quo Ante or Status Quo? Russian Interests in Strategic Arms Control" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p73651_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: International relations theory in recent years has witnessed a wide-ranging debate between rationalist and constructivist approaches to strategic action. Much of international relations theory has been premised on the assumption of rational action, with actors pursuing an instrumental logic (Elster 1989). Other work has focused on the effect of normative rules in constraining behavior, with actors pursuing a logic of appropriateness (March and Simon 1998; Finnemore 1996, Risse, Ropp, & Sikkink 1999). Recent work in international relations theory (Risse 2000, Checkel 2001) has suggested that actors employ a third mode of argumentative behavior, based on the logic of communicative action (Habermas 1984). My paper investigates the extent to which these different three modes of action have been at play in democratic Russia's debates about strategic arms control. I suggest new ways of establishing which mode actors are likely to employ. I argue that by operationalizing the concepts of uncertainty, history, and rationality, we can more concretely specify the conditions under which actors are most likely to act instrumentally, follow rules of appropriate behavior, engage in communicative action, and switch between modes. I demonstrate this argument through an analysis of how democratic Russia has defined its national interest in strategic arms control and missile defense with regard to the United States. The Russian elite over the much of the post-Soviet period has coalesced around a definition of Russia's core interest as maintenance of its great power status, and has based its current position on its past status to determine its approach to arms control issues. From 1994-2000, elite reliance on logic of appropriateness prevented the Russian state from rationally learning from its weakness to secure arms control agreements and decreased Russia's ability to engage the US on these issues. A democratic developmentalist segment of the elite has consistently employed the mode of communicative action to undermine consensus on Russia's great power status, arguing in the language of Western rationalism for regarding Russia as a regional power rather than a global one. They have gradually reduced the Russian elite's uncertainty about its strategic security environment and its new democratic structure and undermined action based on the appropriateness of Russia's great power status. The result since 2001 has been a change from Russia's pursuit of status to a more rational evaluation of costs and benefits in strategic arms control. Constructivist and game theoretic approaches that rely on the logic of reciprocity suggest that states form their identities and their security interests (Wendt, 1999) or their strategies (Axelrod, 1984) by mirroring the behavior of other states. My approach highlights the fact that when the logic of appropriateness reigns, Russia's interests in strategic arms control is defined as much by its image of its past self as by the past actions of other states. It also specifies the mechanisms through which the standards of appropriateness can be undermined through communicative action, ironically producing a much more rational discourse regarding security interests.

2004 - The Law and Society Association Words: 344 words || 
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2. Drybread, Kristen. "A Mouth Full of Ants: The Relationships of Brazilian Street Children to Crime" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Renaissance Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, May 27, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p117385_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Beginning with the funeral of a street child-turned-drug-baron, this paper will discuss relationships between street children and crime. Within the popular Brazilian imagination, street children are often portrayed as irredeemable criminals who are dangerous to themselves and to society. The force of this stereotype—especially when coupled with rising crime rates and popular frustration with the criminal justice system—has made street children the frequent targets of death squads and vigilante killers using murder to “clean-up” the streets of Brazilian cities.
Yet, the image of their criminality does not coincide with the reality of most street children’s lives. My research shows that street children rarely participate in crime. Further, when they do break the law, street children typically commit misdemeanors such as loitering, petty theft, drug possession, and vandalism. Street children are seldom brought to trial for committing acts of violence; and when they are, the targets of their aggressions are most often other street children, not middle or working class strangers. In fact, street children are more often victims of adult violence than perpetrators of violent crimes. Arguably, it is their social position and not their participation in crime that renders Brazilian street children criminal in the eyes of dominant society.
In Brazil, most kids who commit crimes—and particularly the violent crimes of murder and rape—are children who grow up at home, within the parameters of what is considered a “normal” Brazilian childhood. Through an examination of the category of “normal” Brazilian childhood this paper will analyze the historical, moral, social and cultural forces that have contributed to the formation of the Brazilian image of the street child as a dangerous and anti-social criminal. At the same time, the paper will investigate the rise of the converse image of the Brazilian street child that circulates outside of Brazil: the street child as suffering and innocent victim of adult abuses and injustices. The paper will explore the possible effects these contrary images have for the daily lives and possible futures of boys and girls who live and work on Brazilian streets.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 50 pages || Words: 19660 words || 
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3. Datz, Giselle. "Tracking Sovereign Default Costs: Ex Ante, Ex Post, or Inexistent?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p251201_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Here I argue that in examining the outcomes of default how is contingent on when. A framework for assessing default costs is developed, unpacking slots of short time periods and associating them to a typology of costs. Through a process tracing analysis of the Argentine default and debt restructuring (2001-2005), it is showed how different types of default costs are combined, manifested, and eventually dissipated. Critical is not how exorbitant the costs are at several levels, but how their time-contingent nature leads to an ultimately amendable impact in terms of both economic recovery and political stability. This outcome is, however, based on complex dynamics and is consequently not easily predictable. Hence, uncertainty on the part of debtors as to the macroeconomic (liquidity) environment and to the microeconomic incentives of investors in bond markets keeps defaults as still relatively rare occurrences, even in the absence of a global enforcement authority in the arena of sovereign debt contracts. An implication is that international policy efforts that try to institutionalize a sovereign debt restructuring mechanism may damage this critical ad hoc link which seems to be working more often than not to induce compliance on the part of debtors.

2008 - International Congress for Conservation Biology Words: 180 words || 
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4. Dunham, Amy. and Mikheyev, Alexander. "INVASIVE TRAMP ANTS CAUSE COLLAPSE OF UNDERSTORY FOOD WEB IN AN AFRICAN RAINFOREST" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Congress for Conservation Biology, Convention Center, Chattanooga, TN, Jul 10, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p244365_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: Understanding the ecosystem level impacts of invasive species is crucial for both the conservation and successful restoration of communities and ecosystem function. Tropical rainforest ecosystems are threatened worldwide by development and deforestation and invasive species present an additional threat by altering ecological processes through direct alteration of the environment or indirectly through changes in communities and trophic structure. The tramp ant, Wasmannia auropunctata, a native of Central and South America has been spreading invasively throughout central African rainforests and elsewhere as a result of anthropogenic activities such as logging and oil extraction. Little is known about the effect of this invasive species on native invertebrate communities or on ecosystem processes. We examined how fire ant invasion affects invertebrate communities, herbivory levels, leaf chemistry, and nutrient cycling in 19 separate invasion fronts spreading from forest clearings within an oil concession in the rainforest of Gabon. Results suggest that presence of this exotic ant dramatically alters abundance and diversity of native invertebrates on the forest floor and changes herbivore communities with consequences for both nutrient regimes and herbivory levels.

2009 - SASE Annual Conference Words: 198 words || 
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5. Thierry, Amougou. "Asymétries d’informations ex ante, asymétries d’information ex post et préférence pour la liquidité : Quelques enseignements théoriques de la crise des subprimes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Sciences Po, Paris, France, Jul 16, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p307130_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: La théorie économique sur l’intermédiation financière soutient que les banques existent parce qu’elles ont un avantage comparatif dans la production et la gestion de l’information dans un environnement socioéconomique où prévaut l’incertitude. Elles arriveraient, grâce à cet avantage comparatif, à séparer non seulement les mauvais clients des bons, mais aussi les mauvais projets des bons. Autrement dit, les banques réussissent à limiter drastiquement des situations de sélection adverse (asymétries ex ante) et d’aléa moral (asymétries ex post) qui sont source d’octroi de crédit à des clients ayant un fort risque de défaut, et de financement des projets extrêmement risqués.

Etant donné que la crise des subprimes prouve que les banques américaines avaient la bonne information sur les capacité de remboursement des ménages qui ont eu droit aux crédits immobiliers, nous voulons montrer ce que cela implique dans la conception théorique des banques comme des agences réalisant des économies d’échelles dans la collecte et la gestion des informations relatives aux clients et aux projets. Les banques ont par ailleurs, après avoir reçu les fonds publics, montré une grande préférence pour la liquidité. Qu’est-ce que cela implique dans leur rôle schumpétérien de soutien de l’investissement ?

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