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2012 - Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Council for European Studies Words: 117 words || 
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1. fenton, anny. "Explaining Anti-Immigrant Support: Predicting anti-immigrant party support in the UK using group size theory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Council for European Studies, Omni Parker House Hotel, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2019-04-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p549120_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Many studies of dominant groups' negative attitudes towards minority groups have leveraged visibility and contact theories popularized by Blalock and Allport and examined the influence of minority group size on negative attitudes. These studies have found contradictory results, however. This paper examines the possibility that these results are due to group visibility measures that ignore individuals' subjective experience. Instead, this paper uses a variant on traditional visibility measures to examine how area demographics and immigrant growth rates may have influenced support for anti-immigrant parties in the United Kingdom in the 2005 General Election. The analyses suggest that an area’s anti-immigrant attitudes are influenced by its level of immigrant growth rates, low-skilled occupations population and older resident population.

2017 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 8925 words || 
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2. Hughes, Ceri. "Anti-Europe, anti-immigrant and anti-party: UKIP issue ownership and the road to Brexit." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1282339_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) was the only large UK political party universally in support of the Leave campaign in the 2016 European Union referendum. All the other major UK political parties were completely or mainly on the side of Remain. Yet UKIP won. Using a mixed methodology of content analysis and debate network analysis, this research illustrates how UKIP effectively conflated the issues of Europe and immigration throughout the run-up to the 2015 General Election and were given partial ownership of, and competence on, the issue. They placed themselves as an “antiparty” party, outside “establishment” politics on the side of “ordinary people”. This placed them in a strong position to potentially dictate the discourse agenda leading to the referendum. This illustrates that smaller parties can be granted elite status to set agenda on germane issues. This research also concludes that UKIP’s “fundi/antiparty” strategy and success identifies a potential path for core-issue parties.

2011 - ISPP 34th Annual Scientific Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5590 words || 
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3. Smeekes, Anouk., Van Acker, Kaat., Verkuyten, Maykel. and Vanbeselaere, Norbert. "Past and present anti-immigrant parties: How perceived ideology similarity affects current anti-immigrant attitudes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 34th Annual Scientific Meeting, Bilgi University, Istanbul, Turkey, Jul 09, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p511161_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Recently several Dutch and Belgian politicians have suggested that it is possible to identify similarities in the discourses used by former Nazi collaborator parties during WWII and contemporary anti-immigrant parties. The present research examined to what extent perceived ideology similarity of past Nazi collaborator parties and present anti-immigrant parties affects current anti-immigrant attitudes in Belgium and the Netherlands. More specifically, we focused on two ideological dimensions that have been shown to characterize the anti-immigration standpoints of these past and present parties: (1) protection of national welfare and (2) ethnic representation of national identity (Swyngedouw, 1995). In line with our expectations, framing the similarities (compared to the differences) in past Dutch and Belgian Nazi collaborator and present anti-immigrant party ideology on these two dimensions resulted in higher perceived welfare and culture ideology similarity. Perceived welfare ideology similarity subsequently resulted in less agreement with the notion that current national welfare should be protected from immigrants. Likewise, perceived culture ideology similarity subsequently resulted in lower endorsement of an ethnic representation of national identity. Thus, the present research demonstrates that historical representations are more than just collective memories, rather they shape shared perceptions that inform and guide actions in the present.

2013 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 97 words || 
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4. Griff, Ellen. "He Ain’t (Just) Heavy, He’s an Anchor Baby: Anti-Fat and Anti-Immigrant Rhetoric and the Production of the Immigrant Threat" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Cincinnati Netherland Plaza, Cincinnati, OH, Nov 07, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-04-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p661327_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines how First Lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move!” campaign intersects with anti-immigrant rhetoric to construct the Latina mother and her child as not only non-citizens but anti-citizens who threaten American national security. Focusing specifically on the Public Service Announcements (PSAs) targeted toward the Latina/o community for preventing or “fighting” la obesidad (obesity), this paper argues that while the campaign is arguably well-intentioned, its characterization of “obesity” in militarized language such as a “threat” or an “enemy” which must be “fought” reproduces nationalistic, anti-immigration rhetoric of Latina mothers and their children as threats to the nation-state.

2011 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 97 words || 
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5. Burford, Arianne Lynne. "Breaking Down Walls: Teaching for Social Transformation in a Queer, Feminist Class in a Anti-Immigrant, Anti-Queer State" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, SHERATON HOTEL (DOWNTOWN) ATLANTA, Atlanta, GA, <Not Available>. 2019-04-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p513464_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: This paper emerges from my experience teaching in Women’s and Gender Studies at two different universities in Arizona and the disturbing anti-immigrant racist ideologies. My project will connect what I have observed to feminist and queer theory to analyze why students’ responses to the documentary Made in LA have changed so drastically, specifically in the wake of SB1070. I will propose ideas and invite dialogue about how teaching for social transformation can address these challenges. How can we break down walls to adequately address social injustice regarding the border and decentralize knowledge production and neoliberal politics?

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