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2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Auspurg, Katrin., Hinz, Thomas. and Schneck, Andreas. "Appointment Procedures as Tournaments: Revisiting Male and Female Scientists’ Chances of Being Appointed as Professor" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <X-UNKNOWN/X-UNKNOWN>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1120274_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: For a long time, discrimination against female scientists was regarded as a major reason for their significant underrepresentation among university professors. However, evidence from recent studies of the academic system contradicts this assumption—that is, women are in fact in a more favorable position than men in terms of appointment procedures. Our primary thesis is that these different viewpoints are too superficial and do not take into account specific hiring procedures and their respective logics. Appointment procedures might be regarded as tournaments that consist of several selection rounds, from application to eventual appointment. Selections are based not only on an applicant’s qualifications but also on who is competing with whom, and for what position. For our study, a labor queue model has been applied to process-produced data collected on more than 200 such appointments processed at a medium-sized German university (2001-2013). In addition to procedural data regarding the five stages of the selection process, additional information on the applicants’ academic career were included into our analysis. The results suggest that, given their academic qualifications, fewer female scientists apply for tenured positions than might be expected. As the appointment procedures progress through the first couple of stages, the proportion of women among the applicants increases. Analyses based on performance indicators suggest that, on the whole, women have a fair chance of being placed first on a shortlist—a finding contrary to previous assumptions about either discriminatory or preferential treatment of women who are on a career path to tenured professorship.

2007 - Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 30 pages || Words: 14125 words || 
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2. Hendershot, Marcus. "Temporal Variance in the Lower Court Appointment Process: Establishing Periodic Regimes of Appointment Events" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, IL, Apr 12, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p196540_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: While a consensus seems to exist on the occurrence of temporal change within the judi-cial appointment process, and recent events and relevant literatures attest to the presence of temporal variance, it remains unclear exactly when and where these critical turning points can be found. This analysis of lower court appointment events presents a simple residual analysis that suggests distinct regimes of activity can be identified. Over the last century of activity, at least three of these regimes emerge. The first runs from the turn of the century through the Truman administration. The second period of consistent activity continues through to the middle of the Carter administration, when the modern process of partisan conflict emerges. The presence of these periodic appointment regimes should have new implications for our understanding of appointment norms such as the influence of senatorial courtesy and our expectations for the ideological propensities of success-fully appointed judges.

2016 - 87th SPSA Annual Conference Words: 178 words || 
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3. Sidorsky, Kaitlin. "Becoming Appointed: The Men and Women Appointed at the State Level" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 87th SPSA Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Jan 07, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1079369_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Studies of political appointments at the state level focus almost exclusively on top-level appointees in departments, agencies, and the governor's staff. This has increased our understanding of how gender functions in political appointments at the state level, but we still do not have a full understanding of the effects of gender in all levels of political appointment at the state level. My study uses an original survey analysis of over 900 men and women appointed to low level political appointments such as boards and commissions, and high level political appointments such as directors and secretaries of state agencies to understand the role gender plays in becoming appointed at the state level. The paper particularly focuses on the role of recruitment to political appointment. This study argues that similar to recruitment for office in the electoral world, appointed women will report lower instances of recruitment for both elected office and higher appointed office. Beyond general recruitment, this paper breaks up recruitment to look into the differences between initial recruitment for the current office, and progressive recruitment for higher office.

2004 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 37 pages || Words: 9188 words || 
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4. Bertelli, Anthony. and Gonzalez Juenke, Eric. "Strategic Presidential Appointments" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 15, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p83231_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We empirically examine competing articulations of the
administrative presidency strategy (Nathan 1983). It has been argued,
on the one hand, that the administrative presidency strategy implies
that presidents appoint ideological allies to administrative positions.
Alternatively, economists have recognized that strategic agent
selection (i.e., the selection of non-allies) can, in certain
circumstances, maximize a principal's utility (Vickers 1985). We
present a spatial version of the strategic delegation framework for
executive appointments, and test its predictive capacity against that
of the ally principle. Our data include appointee characteristics and
preference estimates for legislators and presidents from 1932-1982. Our
results suggest that the administrative presidency strategy is
incomplete without an account of strategic delegation.

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