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2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Words: 36 words || 
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1. Suzuki, Shigehiro. "Institutional Arrangement of the United Nations for the Protection of and Assistance to Internally Displaced Persons “Collaborative Approach” and Alternative Approaches" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2018-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p415483_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper draws on organizational theory to analyze bureaucratic politics within the United Nations. Taking the view of the international organizations as autonomous actors, it examines how different agencies of the same organization interact with each

2010 - The Law and Society Association Words: 446 words || 
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2. Wragg, Paul. "A Common Approach to the Problem of Commercial "Free Speech"? Assessing the UK and US Approach to the Constitutional Protection of Commercial Expression" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Renaissance Chicago Hotel, Chicago, IL, May 27, 2010 <Not Available>. 2018-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p407204_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The question of whether commercial expression is or should be treated as a form of free speech seems to be a persistent problem, both in theory and practice. The suggestion that it should be protected by the First Amendment can be traced back to Martin Redish’s influential 1971 paper, ‘The First Amendment in the Marketplace’ in the George Washington Law Review and the arguments advanced by Redish – along with those made by Steven Shiffrin, Alex Kozinski and Stuart Banner, Robert Post et al – provide a range of compelling reasons why commercial speech ought to be treated seriously. However, the inclusion of commercial speech within the realm of coverage is not without its detractors, notably Eric Barendt in the UK, the leading UK expert on free speech.

Yet, although both the US and UK judiciary seem to have embraced the idea that the constitutional guarantee of free speech is capable of protecting commercial speech, there remains a guardedness to the extent to which such speech is protected and, therefore, an uncertainty about when and, indeed, why it should be so protected. For example, recently in the UK the Court of Appeal referred to the ‘important issues of free speech’ that comparative advertising raises, with only a tantalizing reference to what these ‘important issues’ are and how those issues compare with the values at stake where political speech is concerned. The indication that commercial speech may serve the same value as political speech – by providing information of importance to the public at large – invokes those arguments that Redish, Shiffrin and Post et al raised and also poses the question of whether, in such circumstances, commercial speech ought to be afforded the same level of protection as political speech.

Furthermore, although sharing a common theme – that commercial speech may be protected on account of furthering a public interest – the UK and US courts’ approach to the protection of commercial speech seems to differ. In particular, in the US there seems to be greater scrutiny of whether the speech does benefit the public interest than in the UK.

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the similarities and differences in approach to the question in order to discern what lessons can be learned about the problem of free speech and, indeed, what normative judgments can be made about commercial expression in both jurisdictions. In doing so, this paper will touch upon the broader issue of whether the US and UK can approach the problem in the same way because of differences in the way that the right to freedom of speech is realised in the US compared to the UK.

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Pages: 18 pages || Words: 9193 words || 
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3. Karp, David. "Do Transnational Corporations Have Human Rights Responsibility? The Capacity Approach vs. the Publicness Approach" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p500288_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The capacity approach to human rights responsibility says that core human-rights-based obligations should be assigned to whichever agent has the capacity most effectively to protect or to provide for individuals' human rights in a particular set of circumstances. The publicness approach says that these obligations should be assigned to agents that are relevantly public, but not to agents that are relevantly private. When looking at the political context of many weak governance zones, such as the Niger Delta, the capacity approach concludes that human rights responsibility should be assigned to transnational corporations (such as Shell). By contrast, the publicness approach concludes that TNCs can have only 'secondary' obligations to help to build the capacity of the Nigerian state, which is the main human-rights-responsible agent. The main objection to the publicness approach -- an important one -- is that that the approach's normative conclusions allow for individuals' human rights to be violated in the short term, in order to secure the conditions of the construction of relevantly public agents in the longer-term. This paper argues that the publicness approach to human rights responsibility should be adopted despite this objection.

2010 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 104 words || 
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4. Calderoni, Francesco. and Caneppele, Stefano. "Administrative Approach opposed to Criminal Approach in the Fight against Organized Crime: Does it Always Work?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, <Not Available>. 2018-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p431828_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper argues administrative strategies to counter organized crime as an alternative to criminal law. Considering the difficulties in tackling organized crime with the traditional approach of law enforcement and prosecution, scientific research has highlighted the need for alternative policy approaches. These should shift the focus from enforcement policies to prevention policies.
Non-criminal or administrative approaches to organized crime have been introduced in different contexts (New York, Amsterdam, Italy). This paper focuses on the Italian case. Since the beginning of the 1990s Italy has introduced an administrative certification mechanism for participation in public procurement. Twenty years after its establishment the certificazione antimafia shows significant problems.

2013 - LRA 63rd Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 1996 words || 
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5. Cisco, Jonathan. "Approaching difficult texts in the humanities: A case study of honors students' attitudes and approaches toward the great works" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 63rd Annual Conference, Omni Dallas Hotel, Dallas, Texas, Dec 04, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p663239_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

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