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2010 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 104 words || 
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1. Calderoni, Francesco. and Caneppele, Stefano. "Administrative Approach opposed to Criminal Approach in the Fight against Organized Crime: Does it Always Work?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p431828_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper argues administrative strategies to counter organized crime as an alternative to criminal law. Considering the difficulties in tackling organized crime with the traditional approach of law enforcement and prosecution, scientific research has highlighted the need for alternative policy approaches. These should shift the focus from enforcement policies to prevention policies.
Non-criminal or administrative approaches to organized crime have been introduced in different contexts (New York, Amsterdam, Italy). This paper focuses on the Italian case. Since the beginning of the 1990s Italy has introduced an administrative certification mechanism for participation in public procurement. Twenty years after its establishment the certificazione antimafia shows significant problems.

2013 - LRA 63rd Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 1996 words || 
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2. Cisco, Jonathan. "Approaching difficult texts in the humanities: A case study of honors students' attitudes and approaches toward the great works" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 63rd Annual Conference, Omni Dallas Hotel, Dallas, Texas, Dec 04, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p663239_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2013 - 37th Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 165 words || 
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3. Sartin, Natalie. "Toward a Pedagogical Approach in African-Centered Womanist Theory: The Relevance of the Critical Methods and Approaches of the Late Nineteenth Century Black Women Activist to Educators Today" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 37th Annual National Council for Black Studies, The Westin Hotel - Downtown, Indianapolis, ID, Mar 13, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p646911_index.html>
Publication Type: Panelist Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper is an ongoing examination of Black women activists of the late nineteenth century who employed several critical methods and approaches in their task of imparting skills for the regeneration of the Black race. This is otherwise known as “racial uplift.” Although scholars have written about these methods, few have argued on the relevance of these approaches to educators today. Even fewer have examined these methods through an Afrocentric lens – the essentiality of language and behaviors unique to people of African descent. This paper addresses such gaps by arguing that the critical methods and approaches utilized by these women are both useful and essential in the onerous tasks of educating the present generation. Expounding upon the discourse of African-centered teaching practices, this paper will examine the ways in which these women taught from an African-centered womanist perspective – either knowingly or did so intuitively, unaware of this theory. Thus, this work is offered as a suitable and necessary pedagogy, purposeful to educators today.

2009 - International Marine Conservation Congress Pages: 4 pages || Words: 1501 words || 
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4. Jones, Peter. "Governing marine protected areas: different approaches to achieving a balanced approach" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Marine Conservation Congress, George Madison University, Fairfax, Virginia, May 20, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p296296_index.html>
Publication Type: Oral Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The management of MPAs must balance the need to achieve strategic biodiversity conservation objectives, often through statutory obligations, with the need to promote stakeholder participation in decision-making, often through co-management. In order to achieve this balance, it is widely recognised that the management of MPAs involves a combination of both top-down and bottom-up approaches, but what does this mean? This key question is explored through an analysis of MPA case studies from different contexts around the world. This analysis focuses on the different approaches that have been employed to address basic conflicts between resource exploitation and biodiversity conservation objectives, recognising that such conflicts should be the focus of such analyses, rather then vainly seeking consensus. The main reason MPAs may not be effective in achieving biodiversity conservation objectives is that they lack the capacity to address such conflicts. In order to address such basic conflicts there often needs to be a balance between the controlling role of relevant authorities and the devolvement of authority to stakeholders. If an appropriate balance is not achieved there are risks that the vested interests of certain stakeholders will influence MPA management decisions to the degree that the strategic biodiversity conservation obligations are undermined. This paper explores the potential of different ‘incentives’ (legal, customary, economic, proprietorship & knowledge) to address such conflicts through case studies from around the world with a view to seeking examples of good practice in effectively governing MPAs, analysing their transferability to different contexts and collating different approaches to such good practice

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 6703 words || 
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5. Saruya, Hiroe. "Theories on Democracy: From Sociological Approaches toward a Semiotic Approach" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p104330_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Democracy has been the key concept triggering the transition and transformation of our societies, especially after the collapse of the former Soviet Union. Democracy is also one of the issues that sociological works have dealt with. Aiming to critically examine the sociological approach to democracy, this paper investigates theories of democracy in sociology and in political philosophies. The paper argues that: (1) sociological theories have tended to focus on the procedural matter of democracy and take democracy as the matter of the (nation-) state, without much problematizing the tension between civil society and the state; (2) theories of democracy of political philosophies are concerned with the distinction between civil society and the state but have not yet provided lucid conclusions on whether democracy is solely about civil society or about both civil society and the state; and (3) theories from either discipline have not provided a clue to answering the question why the notion of democracy is so appealing in our societies, as seen in the worldwide intervention in Iraq’s democracy. Finally, this paper advocates a semiotic approach, which will shed new light on democracy, by focusing on the power of the notion itself.

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