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2015 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 42 words || 
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1. Hannouchi, Said. "Awareness of Arab Culture Among First Semester Learners of Arabic as Compared to Moroccan Native Speakers of Arabic" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Fairmont Royal York, Toronto, ON, Canada, Mar 21, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p963736_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study addresses a critical gap in research on cultural awareness in foreign-language learners. It investigated whether Moroccan native speakers’ perspectives help determine in what ways foreign language instruction may refer to a NS’s baseline when measuring learners’ attainment of cultural awareness.

2015 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 48 words || 
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2. Cook, William. "Whose Arabic? Legitimacy and Arabic Language Acquisition in the United Arab Emirates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Fairmont Royal York, Toronto, ON, Canada, Mar 21, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p955989_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Derived from a narrative case study with a Canadian expatriate learning Arabic in the United Arab Emirates, this paper presents her story with analysis through the lenses of social position, legitimate language, and symbolic violence, discussing the impact a lack of legitimacy as a speaker has on self-perception.

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Words: 29 words || 
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3. Ali, Hassanein. "Post Arab - Spring: The Arab World between the Dilemma of the Nation - State and the Rise of Violent Non - State Actors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1327108_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper examines the crisis of the nation-state in the Arab world, the expansion of the violent non-state actors, and its impacts on shaping the future of the nation-state.

2011 - ACTFL Annual Convention and World Languages Expo Words: 46 words || 
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4. Brosh, Hezi. "What can Arabic proverbs teach us about Arab Culture?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ACTFL Annual Convention and World Languages Expo, Denver Convention Center, Denver, Colorado, Nov 17, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p497448_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Though modern Arabs no longer live in the desert today, they still use proverbs that were created there out of necessity and need. In this paper I will show what Arabic proverbs can teach us about the Arab culture, its uniqueness and similarities with other cultures.

2014 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 5896 words || 
Info
5. Hazen, Timothy. "The Arab Spring: Explaining Arab Military Behavior through State Security Apparatuses" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, The Hyatt Regency New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 09, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p698621_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) four countries (Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and Yemen) experienced regime change during the Arab Spring uprisings. Scholars argue that a primary reason why regime change occurred was due to the behavior of the military (Barany 2011; Bellin 2012; Lutterbeck 2012). When a government faced mass political protest did the military support the incumbent regime or the protestors? What caused this variation in military behavior? Recent literature has pointed to multiple factors causing this variation including economic self-interests (Goldstone 2011), the size of the social movement (Bellin 2012), ethnic affiliation (Barany 2011) and international actors (Nepstad 2012; Goldstone 2013). While these previous explanations are informative I argue that in order to more fully understand Arab military behavior during the Arab Spring it is important to also examine the role of the military in relation to the entire state security apparatus. I broadly define security apparatuses as the entire collection of a state’s security forces that range from external security, internal security, intelligence, paramilitary and policing. I argue that across the region the relationship between the military and the larger state security apparatus varies and that different security apparatus structures help explain the divergent behavior demonstrated by Arab militaries during the Arab Spring. I posit that certain security apparatus structures allowed some militaries to more easily defect against the regime and support protestors, whereas other security apparatus structures made it institutionally difficult and costly for militaries to defect against the regimes.

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