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2006 - American Society of Criminology (ASC) Pages: 2 pages || Words: 238 words || 
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1. Simon, Leonore. and Zgoba, Kristen. "The Effect of State Mandatory Arrest Policies on Actual Domestic Violence Arrests" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology (ASC), Los Angeles Convention Center, Los Angeles, CA, Nov 01, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p125810_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This research investigates whether state domestic violence arrest policies affect the probability of actual domestic violence arrests in multiple jurisdictions compared to the arrest of other violent felonies. State policies on arrest of domestic violence cases are analyzed and summarized. NIBRS data is used to determine the effect of state arrest policies on the probability of domestic violence arrests compared to other violent felonies. Multivariate analyses are used to assess the predictors of arrest in domestic violence cases. Overall, 42% of domestic violence cases result in arrest. States vary in the percentages of domestic violence cases that result in arrest and range from a low of 25% to a high of 52%. A logistic regression analysis indicates state domestic violence arrest policies do increase the probability of actual domestic violence arrests in some states, decrease the probability of arrests in other states, and have no effect in some states. In addition to state arrest polices, certain offense, victim, offender, and incident characteristics affect the probability of arrest. Domestic violence cases, younger offenders, younger victims, an absence of victim injury, and a female victim all significantly decrease the probability of arrest. Implications for domestic violence policy and law enforcement practice are explored.

2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 224 words || 
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2. Maggard, Scott. "Structural Correlates of Drug Arrests Over Time: City Level Drug Arrests From a Life-Course Perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, <Not Available>. 2019-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p33498_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The relationship between community structure and crime has received a great deal of research attention in criminology over the past two decades. Rising out of the traditions of Shaw and McKay, researchers have documented how structural changes in communities are related to crime rates in those areas. While the majority of these studies have focused on property and violent crimes, few studies have investigated the relationship between social structure and race-specific drug arrests. Moreover most studies investigating structural correlates of crime have used decennial time periods and typically employ change score techniques, only allowing between-city comparisons, while neglecting within-city comparisons. Employing techniques used to study the life-course of individual offenders, this research aims to treat the city as the individual and create distinct trajectories of drug arrest rates over time. Assuming that cities behave differently, this research will shed light on how structural changes in cities affect cities with differing trajectories over time. In addition, it will provide insight into the issue of racial discrepancies in drug arrests that have been documented over the past several decades, and attempt to highlight what structural factors are related to race-specific drug arrests for each distinct trajectory. The results of this study will be used to shed light on which U.S. cities may be in more need than others to receive assistance to rebuild their diminished communities.

2008 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 104 words || 
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3. Linn, Edith. "Heavy Hitters and Empty Suits: Differences between High-Arrest and No-Arrest Officers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri, Nov 12, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p261960_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Based on a questionnaire of 506 NYPD officers who patrol regularly, a group of 94 who reported making three or more arrests in the previous month were compared to 151 who reported making no arrests. The “Heavy Hitters” had greater ease in finding arrests, made a greater percentage of arrests in the last hour of their tour, and used more arrest-generating and fewer arrest-avoiding tactics. They felt more dependent on arrest overtime, despite economic circumstances similar to the No-Arrest group. High-Arresters also held stronger pro-arrest attitudes, had fewer post-tour child-care commitments, and were less “turned-off” by the arrest-processing ordeal.

2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 198 words || 
Info
4. Smith, Thomas. and Acton, Daniel. "Network Characteristics of Hot Spots: Socio-centric Undirected Two-mode Networks of Arrest Location by Arresting Officer and Charge" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 14, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1278872_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: It has long been acknowledged that a high proportion of police service calls (and probably also crimes) have been concentrated on a small number of locations (Sherman et al., 1989). Due to this concentration, the analysis of hot spots is uniquely suited for network analysis. Despite this, for the most part, the network characteristics of hot spots have gone unaddressed. We analyze approximately 12 years of data collected via the Gainesville Police Department’s (GNVPD) publically available daily bulletins which provide information on the arresting officer, arrestee characteristics (race, sex, age), arresting charge(s), arrest location, and time of arrest. Assuming that hot spots span 10-20 square blocks (see Weisburd et al., 2004), we plot two socio-centric undirected two-mode networks: (1) police officers and arrest locations; (2) arresting charge and arrest locations. Additionally, using these two-mode networks we were also able to produce additional networks of co-affiliation between hot spots dependent on overlapping arrest officer/charge. We identify and examine hotspots via their network characteristics including network centrality (specifically centrality, betweenness, and eigenvector), identify cohesive hot spot subgroups, and examine how network centrality measures of arrest location, arresting officer and charge(s) are predicted by each of their respective, available characteristics.

2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 186 words || 
Info
5. Regoeczi, Wendy. and Miethe, Terance. "Situational Variability in Arrest Practices in Incidents of Domestic Violence: A Conjunctive Analysis of Differential Treatment among States with and without Mandatory Arrest Policies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 14, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1276192_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Arrest policies in cases of domestic violence (DV) vary widely across U.S. states. Some states have very restrictive policies and others allow for far greater officer discretion. Using NIBRS data on crime incidents and the method of conjunctive analysis, the current study explores the nature and magnitude of situational variability in the likelihood of cases of domestic violence leading to an arrest within and across states that differ in the restrictiveness of their DV arrest policies. Two specific questions underlie this research: (1) is the likelihood of arrest in DV cases more likely in states with mandatory arrest laws than in states that allow more police discretion in arrest? and (2) are these differences across mandatory vs. discretionary states maintained across different situational contexts (i.e., different types of DV cases defined by the particular victim-offender relationship, the demographic profile of the victim and offender [e.g., gender, race, age the location, time of the offense, its physical location, and the degree of injury suffered]). The results of this study are discussed in terms of their implications for public policy and future research.

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