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2010 - The Law and Society Association Words: 180 words || 
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1. Hetcher, Steven. and Carpenter, Megan. "Conceptual Art, Found Art, Ephemeral Art, and Non-Art: Challenges to Copyright Orthodoxy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Renaissance Chicago Hotel, Chicago, IL, May 24, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p407893_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The presentation will examine creative works that while at the fringe of what is conventionally understood as art nevertheless present issues that go to the core of what constitutes art, especially as this term derives meaning in copyright law. In addition to the creative genres listed in the title, we will discuss other fringe categories such as computer-generated art, art purportedly generated as internal experience and animal art. Each of these genres challenges copyright law orthodoxy regarding fundamental issues such as what constitutes authorship, the meaning and practical implementation of the idea/expression dichotomy, and the fixation requirement. The presentation further examines those issues in light of the fundamental policies behind, and purposes of, copyright law. At the end of the day, our concern intertwines the normative with the conceptual: On one hand, as conceptual artists from Duchamp to Ryan McGinness have done, we seek to explore the question, "What is art?". And on the other hand, we examine to what extent genres of contemporary art challenge core copyright principles, and explore whether copyright law ultimately supports creativity in those contexts.

2011 - 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions Words: 250 words || 
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2. Balka, Ellen. "The Technology of Art and Art of Technology: Exploring the Materiality of Technology through Art" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Crowne Plaza Cleveland City Center Hotel, Cleveland, OH, Nov 02, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p519809_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Recent scholarship in science, technology and society studies (STS) suggests that a greater focus on the materiality of technology can contribute to our understanding of the nature of technological change. Leonardi & Barley (2008) have suggested that the epistemological and ontological nature of the relationship between the material and the social remains unresolved. They have suggested that scholars have had difficulty grappling with the materiality of technology because “they often conflate the distinction between the material and social with the distinction between determinism and voluntarism” (p. 159). They suggest that one result of the equation of materialism with determinism is that STS scholars have generally paid little attention to technology’s material constraints and affordances, preferring instead to focus on the embededness of technologies in their social contexts, and the ways that social contexts influence technological change. Although social contexts into which technology are introduced are clearly important, focusing on social aspects of technology directs attention away from material features of technology people use. Drawing on insights gained from ethnographic observation and interviews, in this paper I explore the materiality of technology in relation to technologies used in the practices of art. Developing a better understanding of the characteristics and properties of technology can help us develop strategies and mechanisms for anticipating and responding to the complexities of contemporary technological systems. This work will help build a dialogue between artists and technologists, both of whom serve to benefit from greater interaction across what is often perceived as an art/ technology divide.

2013 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 190 words || 
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3. Pecenco, Laura M.. "Art as Agent: Using the 'New Sociology of Art' to Analyze Prison Art" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 19, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p675244_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Sociologists of gender often concentrate on the “doing” and “undoing” of gender (West and Zimmerman 1987, 2009; Deutsch 2007; Risman 2009). However, less work has been focused on what is “done”; objects, just like people, are gendered. This paper brings together an analysis of gender and the arts. Following the “new sociology of art” (de la Fuente 2007), I view art works as subjects as well as objects, having their own agency. I argue for the importance of examining the understudied area of prison art to analyze masculinities. Previous scholarship has maintained that the prison is a hypermasculine institution (Rhodes 2001; Evans and Wallace 2008; Curtis 2011), in which the gender of its inhabitants is constantly policed. To examine the objects created by prison inmates, I use a survey of 300 images of male inmate-created art from both online and print sources, along with case studies of 3 of these works of art. This visual sociology approach provides the opportunity to recognize the wide range of gender performativity that exists within the confines of the prison, thereby questioning the assumption that all are subjected to the rigid requirements of hypermasculinity.

2014 - Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 143 words || 
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4. Cempellin, Leda. "Questioning Art and Art History Identities through Arts-Based Research" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 21, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p721658_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A book written in Italian and migrated to the US along with its author, an Italian art historian, finds a new communicative dimension by becoming a ready made for art-making purposes. From an introduction explaining the genesis of the collaborative multimedia project Access Denied, this paper focuses on one of the series’ artworks, namely a video happening, by exploring its genesis, development, outcomes, and legacy. Staged during the day of finals in an advanced art history seminar, the experiment provided an embodied artistic experience and reflections on art history course content in the debate that followed. The video happening became a basis for further reflection on the role of art and art history in stimulating arts-based research at the interstices between biography and scholarly inquiry, between modernism and postmodernism, between object and action, between creation and destruction, between metaphorical and comparative identity constructs.

2014 - Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference Words: 246 words || 
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5. Mandrona, April. "Arts apart: Educational policy, participatory arts-based methodologies and the devaluation of the arts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p709233_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper seeks to contribute to discussions on EFA policy and in particular the emphasis on literacy and numeracy (Goal 6). Using the South African national response as a case study, I examine the tensions around the growing popularity of arts-based methodologies as a means to access and communicate to policy stakeholders the lived experiences of girls in contexts where the arts have been de-prioritized. This lack of support for the arts raises a number of questions regarding the impact of participatory arts-based methodologies on increasing policy dialogue, the primary pillar of effective EFA implementation. Recently UNESCO, the main EFA driver, began to analyze their 48 priority areas. The Creativity Programme, which includes arts education, was ranked at the bottom and marked for elimination. If cut, the promotion of and access to the arts for marginalized young people around the world would be seriously compromised. In keeping with international trends, the South African government has continued to focus on math and science education, often to the detriment of other subject areas such as art. It cannot be assumed that all policy stakeholders have the artistic literacy necessary to decode the artistic productions of girls or that participatory arts-based methodologies provide an unmediated depiction of girls’ lifeworlds, especially given the devalued position of the arts and lack of comprehensive arts education. It is therefore necessary to complicate the notion that girls’ capacity to gain voice, agency and empowerment through art is unimpeded by sociocultural and political influences.

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