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2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6538 words || 
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1. Kim, Parang. and Campbell, Mary. "Are South Asians “Asian American”? Rethinking Analytical Racial Categories for South Asians" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p507845_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores the diversity within the panethnic Asian American “racial” category frequently used in demographic research, investigating the variation in the lived experiences of South Asians, Southeast Asians and East Asians. We review the arguments for and against the inclusion of South Asians in the Asian American category and discourse, and provide descriptive data demonstrating the similarities and differences between South Asians and other Asian American ethnic groups. We make recommendations for new analytical categories, focusing on the differences in outcomes across various demographic domains of research.
Supporting Publications:
Supporting Document

2016 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 1 words || 
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2. Wong, Bin. "The Problem of Lawfulness in Inner Asian and East Asian Political Relations: East Asian Trade and Tribute in Comparative and Connected Perspectives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1114967_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Pending

2015 - 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 245 words || 
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3. Takayama, Keita. "The Implication of ‘Asian Education Model’ to Anglo-American Education Reform: Comparative Discourse Analysis of 'Japan’s Educational Success' and 'Asian PISA success'" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Washington Hilton Hotel, Washington D.C., <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p976865_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper explores different media and scholarly discourses within which 'Asian education success' has been articulated in education reform debates in US and Australia (and by extension other English-speaking Anglo-American countries). It seeks to identify the cultural and socio-economic logics underpinning the way certain meanings are generated out of and policy implications are drawn from 'Asian education success' in these countries. To this aim, the paper examines two critical moments in the global attention to Asian education: the considerable Western attraction to Japanese education from the mid 1980 onward against the background of the country's rising economic status and 2) more recent Western 'infatuation' with Asian education promoted by Asian cities and countries’ outstanding rankings in PISA league tables. Drawing on critical sociological studies of policy discourse in education, the author demonstrates both the continuity and changes in the way ‘Asian education’ has been articulated in the Western education policy discourse over the last three decades. The key findings of the study are: 1) Western discourse on Asian education success continues to be underpinned by the fear of Asia's economic dominance and the Orientalizing assumption of Asia as the cultural ‘other’; 2) these economic and cultural logics have constrained the articulation of Asian education success, perpetuating the anti-liberal and anti-humanistic image of Asian education; 3) this dominant representation, however, is increasingly contested by handful researchers and media where alternative images of Asian education are presented and different policy implications are drawn from Asian educational success.

2015 - Eleventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 144 words || 
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4. Nigam, Anita. and Isidro, Elizabeth. "What does it mean to be Asian? : A Comparative Study of Asian Multicultural Literature" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eleventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 20, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p989669_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This qualitative study describes the responses and processes involved in responding to texts written by authors from one’s own cultural ethnic background in comparison to texts by authors of other ethnicities. Based on a content analysis of the responses, preliminary findings indicate the participants’ responses to texts coming from their own cultural background are significantly richer from those responses to texts outside of their own backgrounds. This could be attributed to the presence of funds of knowledge that serve as repositories of culture, needed in gaining more personal and deeper understandings of texts. Results imply the need for a critical understanding of responses to texts based on broader definitions of what it means to be Asian within the world of multicultural literature. We offer insights to the audience by addressing and advocating for voice amidst blurred racial and ethnic identities.

(140 words excluding the title)

2015 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 283 words || 
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5. Joo, Rachael. "The Political Impact of Asian Athletes in Asian America" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Centre and Towers, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1016730_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: Asian athletes operate as a transnational force in shaping politics in Asian American communities. The media appeal of celebrity athletes like Manny Pacquiao and Yuna Kim enables them to convey powerful ideas about nation, capitalism, and gender in both their perceived places of origin and the United States. This paper discusses how visual representations of these athletes in film, television, and digital media operate to make traveling athletes into national symbols of their home countries. This paper investigates how they operate to shape ideas about mobility between their homelands and the United States. While they indicate the growing role of transnationalism in shaping immigrant communities, athletes also strategically negotiate the difference between Asian and Asian Americans.

While there remains an expectation of national representation for many Asian athletes, it is not often that athletes are understood as political agents themselves. Rather than simply puppets of handlers, Asian athletes make decisions to engage in and with political campaigns. I investigate just how these representations translate to politics on the ground. How do campaigns that involve athletes shape the direction of political discourse and the realities on the ground for Asian people in the United States? How do they affect the transnational relationship between countries through their appeals to not only Asian audiences but broader mass audiences in multiple nations? While the fascist potential of sport must be addressed, the broader role of celebrity in shaping political action is also considered. The connections between commercial sports sponsorships and the political action (or inaction) of athletes must also be considered. In doing so, this paper presents sport as a domain not only where broader ideological battles take place, but also as a site of political action.

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