Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 291 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 59 - Next  Jump:
2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
Info
1. Capoccia, Giovanni. "Mixed Method Research in Comparative Politics: A Discussion of Basic Assumptions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152869_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 40 pages || Words: 13070 words || 
Info
2. Hart, Randle. "Practicing Birchism: The Assumption and Limits of Idiocultural Coherence in Framing Theory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p101275_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Social movement theory and research over the past twenty years has utilized the concepts incorporated under the rubric of Framing Theory in order to draw attention to the cultural “meaning work” within a social movement or social movement organization. Underlying Framing Theory is an assumption of what I term idiocultural coherence – that for a movement organization to be successful, its members must come to agree cognitively with its cultural understandings and identify collectively with it. Drawing on an example of the John Birch Society, a very successful conspiratorial, anti-communist organization, I show how people may join a social movement organization, not because they agree with its collective action frames, but because it provides an opportunity to act collectively and publicly perform a collective identity. I argue that a narrow focus on idiocultural processes obfuscates important cultural processes “outside” of a movement organization that have an impact on how and why people join an organization and maintain membership.
Supporting Publications:
Supporting Document

2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 24 pages || Words: 6707 words || 
Info
3. Ganesh, Shiv. "From Corporate Responsibility to Social Accountability: A Critique of Three Assumptions of Sustainable Development Discourse" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Online <PDF>. 2019-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p89090_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Whereas scholarly analyses of corporate social responsibility (CSR) have proliferated in the field of organizational communication this last decade, few such analyses assess this discourse with reference to a dominant development discourse of our times, namely that of sustainable development. This essay aims to contribute to our understanding of CSR by examining its discursive relationship with sustainable development, and then unpacking and critiquing three assumptive bases of conventional sustainable development discourse. The essay concludes by revisiting the connection between CSR and sustainable development and argues that emergent alternative understandings of sustainability might be better facilitated by treating ethical corporate communication in terms of social accountability rather than corporate responsibility.

2004 - International Studies Association Pages: 30 pages || Words: 14773 words || 
Info
4. Bertrand, Jacques. "National Models, Ethnic Conflict and Special Autonomy: Reassessing our Assumptions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p72475_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper discusses the causes of ethnic conflict and the usefulness of autonomy in addressing these sources of conflict. Based on a historical institutionalist framework of analysis, the paper argues that autonomy solutions are constrained by what I call national models. These national models are shaped and transformed at various critical juntures when ethnic relations are renegotiated and institutionalized in various ways. As a result, the application of general solutions in the form of autonomy packages (including federal or conferedal solutions) will fail in many instances. The paper analyses these trends in several cases.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 6794 words || 
Info
5. Bas, Muhammet. "Military Spending, Investment and Economic Growth: Relaxing the Linearity Assumption" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p84798_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The link between military spending and economic growth has been one of the long-lasting empirical debates of political science. There is no clear consensus on the sign and the magnitude of this relationship, and empirical support for competing hypotheses is somewhat weak. Previous empirical research for the most part assumed a linear functional form for the relationship, and this paper relaxes this assumption by using a nonparametric approach in estimating the theorized simultaneous equation model. The results show that military spending affects economic growth only through investment, and this effect is nonlinear. For low values of military spending, an increase in spending has an indirect positive effect on growth. In contrast, the effect is negative for moderate values of military spending.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 59 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy