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2006 - American Studies Association Words: 456 words || 
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1. Mason, Sara. "“Look at Atlanta Now”: Constructions of Place, History and Race in the Making and Re-Making of Atlanta" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113994_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: From its humble beginnings as Terminus, Atlanta has constantly re- invented itself: as a center of industry and commerce; as a cosmopolitan city and cultural center; as an international destination and place to visit; as the birthplace of the civil rights movement. Governor Sonny Perdue’s recent heritage tourism initiative points to the heritage industry as one of the primary sites for producing these images. Touristic images of Atlanta rely upon a dualistic construction of Atlanta as the place where history happened (the Old South) and a place without history (the New South). Images of the New South present Atlanta as a center of urban industrial growth, while the Old South is seen as traditional and timeless. Atlanta, the self-proclaimed capital of the New South, perhaps best captures this tension through the city slogan popularized by Mayor William Hartsfield in 1959: Atlanta: The City too Busy to Hate. As the representative of the New South, Atlanta has tried to re-create itself in the image of the rest of the nation: a place where racism is an issue of the past. In the New South, therefore, racism is incompatible with capitalism. On the other hand, the south writ large must remain marked as the place where racism happens in order to keep the rest of the country free of stain. These various constructions point to how Atlanta relates to, and defines itself by race and history. Thus, a crucial part of creating, recreating, naming and interpreting Atlanta is the use of the racial past in the present. My assertion is that history is best understood as an embodied practice that is created through interpretation, interaction and performance; therefore, history can be thought of as a performance or something that is done. On these tours, history is not simply preserved through performance, but created as it is done. Through this production there is a simultaneously construction of race and history. Therefore, there is a constant flux and negotiation of history and race through their creation and preservation – a fluid stasis; history and race are recreated daily in a context that is constantly changing. Furthermore, the embodiment of history is intimately tied to the construction of place. The creation of place assigns meaning and helps to define who we are and who we are not. Thus, places are specifically designed and constructed to evoke memories, trigger identities, and embody histories. The process of emplacement is explicitly tied to the market, power, normative historical narrative and identity. Thus, tourism mediates our encounters with history, race and place and creates sites of consumption. In short, this paper will explore the themes of historical memory, tourism and the politics of history by drawing upon ethnographic data collected by the author.

2006 - Association for the Study of African American Life and History Words: 243 words || 
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2. Myrick-Harris, Clarissa. ""Fighting for Their Lives": Black Women, the Auset Tradition and the 1906 Atlanta Race Riot" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, NA, Atlanta, GA, Sep 26, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p143412_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: The purpose of my presentation is twofold: I will discuss experiences of specific Black women during and after the 1906 Atlanta Race Riot, noting how broad issues of race, class and gender in early 20th century Atlanta and the nation played out in these women’s experiences. Second, I will discuss ways in which “fighting for their lives” and the lives of those they loved placed these women within a tradition unique to African World women. I label this the Auset tradition, derived from the ancient Kemetic belief system in which Auset assumes myriad roles—wife, mother, warrior, healer and nation builder—to save self, family and community.

Critical studies about African American responses to the 1906 Atlanta Race Riot have focused primarily on the challenges faced by African American men attempting to protect their families and communities against white men who would stop at nothing to defend white womanhood. Most often African American women are discussed in the abstract. With the exception of Lugenia Burns Hope, and perhaps Adrienne Herndon—both members of Atlanta’s Black elite—mention of specific African American women as witnesses or victims of the violence are made in passing. My aim is to provide new insights into the actions of women who are known—such as Hope and Herndon—and several who are virtually unknown. I argue that these women were guided by a tradition that transcended convention and compelled them to defend themselves, rally their men, and respond proactively after the riot.

2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 106 words || 
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3. Burden, Frances. and Ruback, R.. "Comparing Absolute Poverty, Relative Deprivation and Diffusion of Poverty: An Analysis of Recidivism Patterns of Parolees in Atlanta" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p33420_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Parolees are likely to recidivate because they have risk factors that predispose them to crimes (e.g., youth, broken family), and their incarceration weakened such protective factors as health and family relations. This study examines another risk factor for parolees, the economic resources present in neighborhoods in which they reside post-release. Neighborhood poverty has been shown to encourage crime and increase levels of social disorganization, yet there is little consensus on the definition of poverty. This study examines three different types of poverty – absolute poverty, relative deprivation, and diffusion – and their relation to recidivism rates and individual parolee’s recidivism throughout Metropolitan Atlanta.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: 19 pages || Words: 4141 words || 
Info
4. Chattopadhyay, Sumana. and Rhea, David. "Antipathy for the Intruder or Empathy for the Victim: An Analysis of Newspaper Coverage of Katrina Evacuees Relocated to Atlanta and Houston" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p260489_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper conducts a content analysis of local newspaper coverage on Katrina evacuees who relocated to Atlanta and Houston. It applies Van Gorp's (2005) victim/intruder conceptualization for asylum seekers to the context of evacuees and tries to understand how two big local newspapers in Atlanta and Houston have framed Katrina evacuees who relocated to these cities. This study's main purpose therefore is to better understand the evacuee resettlement experience and how local media print helps shape that.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Pages: 27 pages || Words: 7728 words || 
Info
5. Burch, Traci. "Getting Out the Vote in Atlanta, Charlotte, and Chicago: The Strategies and Tactics of Parties, Campaigns, and Non-Profits" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p361087_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This project explores the GOTV efforts of campaigns, parties, and non-profit groups in Atlanta, Charlotte, and Chicago. These three cities are of particular interest given their location in battleground states this election season. The purpose of the study is to identify and document the strategies employed by these organizations to encourage political participation among citizens, particularly low income citizens. In essence, the project is designed to get a sense of the standard operating procedures of organizations that engage in voter mobilization efforts. In order to shed light on these procedures, the research employs multiple methods including interviews and participant observation. The research will address the following questions. First, when local organizations contact potential voters, what is the purpose of the contact? Second, what types of outreach activities do organizations employ to reach voters? Next, how do organizations maximize success when contacting potential voters? Are outreach activities designed to reach a particular segment of the electorate? Finally, what inter-organizational support networks exist, and how do these networks facilitate the sharing of resources, staff, and expertise?

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