Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 593 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 119 - Next  Jump:
2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
1. McNallie, Jenna. "Cultivating Attachment: The Associations Between Past Television Exposure and Adult Attachment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1109260_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using cultivation and attachment theories as the theoretical frameworks, this study examined two potential mediators in the associations between past television exposure and adult romantic attachment: romantic self-efficacy and a multidimensional scale of perceived realism. The resulting analyses shed light on how television exposure during childhood and adolescence may have long-term impacts on adult attachment dimensions (i.e., attachment anxiety and avoidance). Through the use of an online survey, responses from 695 students from a large Midwestern university were obtained. Findings indicate that early overall and genre-specific television exposure can directly promote both secure (lower attachment avoidance) and insecure (higher attachment anxiety) attachment above the influence of parent and peer attachment; however, these relationships are complex when dimensions of perceived realism and romantic self-efficacy are also considered. These patterns of findings contribute to the body of literature on both attachment theory and cultivation analysis, and offer many directions for future research.

2013 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 191 words || 
Info
2. Washington, Heather. "Parent-Child Attachment, Fathers’ Criminal Involvement, and Children’s Behavior: Reassessing the Parental Attachment-Child Behavior Relationship" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p666401_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Criminologists have long been interested in the association between attachment to parents and youths’ behavioral outcomes. Such research views strong parent-child attachment as a buffer for antisocial and delinquent behavior. Limited attention has been given to the possibility that the parental attachment-youth behavior relationship might depend on parents’ characteristics, including their involvement in crime. This study examines whether parents’ involvement in criminal activity moderates the association between parent-child attachment and children’s behavioral outcomes. This question is addressed using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N=4,898) and multilevel Rasch models of children’s externalizing behavior. The findings reveal that, in general, strong parent-child attachment is associated with a lower likelihood of engaging in problem behavior among children. Strong bonds to criminally active parents do not serve as a deterrent to youthful misbehavior, however. Instead, strong attachment to parents who have engaged in crime increases the likelihood that children will exhibit behavior problems. Taken together, the results suggest that not all youth benefit in terms of their behavior from having strong bonds to their parents, and that more research is needed to explore nuances in the parental attachment-child behavior relationship.

2008 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 175 words || 
Info
3. Dreher, Jason. "Attachment and Delinquency: Do Attachments to Others Predict the Recidivism of Juvenile Delinquents During Reentry?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri, Nov 12, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p270570_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Through its history, the juvenile justice system has evolved from a treatment and rehabilitative orientation to one that has increasingly become more punitive. We are seeing more juveniles being transferred into the adult criminal justice system. Of the juveniles remaining in the juvenile justice system, almost 110,000 were in a residential placement facility in 2003, and during the same year, 62 percent of juveniles leaving a residential facility for the community were reported having at least one prior placement with 23 percent reporting a prior placement for a crime different from the current offense. Reentry back into the community is an essential step in the juvenile justice system. This paper will use data collected from juveniles that have been placed in residential facilities by the Philadelphia Family Courts and will examine factors that contribute to recidivism. The following research questions are being explored: (1) Does attachment, whether to the family or school, predict recidivism among juvenile delinquents? And (2) Does attachment differentially affect juveniles in different levels of risk classifications?

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 119 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy