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2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 105 words || 
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1. Alvarez-Rivera, Lorna., Jennings, Wesley. and Lanza-Kaduce, Lonn. "Paternal Attachment and Hispanics: Discovering the Link between Attachment and Self-Control" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p570838_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Gottfredson and Hirschi’s General Theory of Crime is proposed as a general theory in applicability and scope. Their theory focuses on early childhood socialization but it does not specify adequately how features of socialization operate to foster self-control. This study examines Gottfredson and Hirschi’s General Theory of Crime cross-culturally and in relation to paternal attachments. A self-report survey was administered to a sample of 454 college students attending a southeastern and a southwestern university. This research examines how various measures of attachment relate to self-control and how both attachment during high school and self-control predict analogous behavior (e.g., cheating, substance use) and crime during college.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. McLean, Heather. and Bailey, Heidi. "Attachment Representations in Preschool: Predicting Doll Play Representations from Infant and Maternal Attachment Measures" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p962361_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Starting in infancy, children begin to internalize their interactive experiences with caregivers, resulting in cognitive expectancies for caregiver behavior and support (Bowlby, 1982; Bretherington, 1992). In preschool, the internalized attachment representation associated with the experience of distress or need for comfort has generally been assessed using the Attachment Story Completion Task (ASCT; Bretherton, Ridgeway, & Cassidy, 1990) and other doll play measures (Bretherton, Oppenheim, et al., 1990, George & Solomon, 1990/2000). Though attachment research has examined the stability of attachment behaviours from infancy to preschool (e.g., NICHD, 2001; Seifer et al., 2004), there is a lack of research examining the stability of attachment using representational measures in the preschool period. In the present study we explore associations between infant attachment behaviours and preschool attachment representations. Furthermore, we examine their relationship with a measure of mothers’ attachment representations when their child was in infancy.

Forty-five mother-child dyads (23 boys, 22 girls) participated. At a 10-month visit, mothers completed the Secure Base Scripts (SBS; Waters & Rodrigues-Doolabh, 2004), a validated measure of maternal attachment representations. Dyads participated in the Strange Situation Procedure (SSP; Ainsworth et al., 1978) at 13 months, and children completed the Attachment Story Completion Task (Bretherton et al.) at age 3.5 years. The latter was coded on three scales: Secure, Avoidant, and Ambivalent (see Table 1 for example items), using a novel Attachment Narrative Coding System (identifiers removed, 2012). A single security-insecurity dimension was also created by aggregating the three subscales, which were intercorrelated. Infant strange situation attachment classifications were related to this security-insecurity dimension (F (2,42) = 3.83, p = .030), such that infants classified secure demonstrated more secure representations at preschool than those classified organized-insecure. Continuous dimensions from the infant SSP (Fraley & Spieker, 2003) also were used to increase power: high proximity-seeking and low avoidance in infancy was positively associated with secure, and inversely associated with avoidant and ambivalent, preschool representations (see Table 2). Resistant and disorganized infant dimensions were unrelated.

Maternal secure base script scores, assessed in infancy, were not associated with preschool attachment representations. We probed this relationship further, looking at gender differences. For boys, maternal secure base script scores were unrelated to continuous dollplay subscales, whereas for girls, they were significantly associated with the security-insecurity dimension (r = .47, p = .031). Though this gender difference was unexpected, previous research has shown gender differences in how children complete narrative tasks, such that girls tend to give higher quality, more coherent narratives than boys, with emotions more articulately expressed (Von Klitzing et al., 2000; Pierrehumbert et al., 2009). It would appear that girls may be more advanced than boys in their ability to access and articulate their internal narrative and emotional experiences, perhaps meaning they can better access and demonstrate their internal working models at age 3. Further research is needed in order to replicate findings with a larger sample, and to explore gender differences. Although preliminary, results suggest that representations associated with proximity and avoidance may be more stable across early childhood.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Jacobvitz, Deborah., Reisz, Samantha., Messina, Serena., Pettit, Kierra., Poulsen, Helen. and Hazen, Nancy. "Family dynamics from an attachment perspective: Parents’ joint attachment pairings predict couple and parent-infant interactions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p961822_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examined the joint contribution of mothers and fathers’ adult attachment representations on their marital emotional communication and their caregiving quality. Examining the joint contribution of romantic partners’ adult attachment security, Creasey (2002) found that the female partners’ attachment security predicted more positive couple interactions and males’ attachment insecurity predicted more negative interactions. This study sought to replicate these findings with married couples and explore the joint effect of husbands and wives’ attachment representations on their feeding interactions with their baby.

Feeding is an important context for infants to learn to express their needs and develop self-regulation. Controlling children’s food intake versus sensitively responding to children’s cues has been linked to later eating disorders and internalizing problems. Moreover, because of its link with survival, feeding may elicit more primitive reactions from parents. Hence, this study examined the joint effects of parents’ attachment security on caregiving during feedings.

Couples (N=125), mostly white and middle-SES, were followed over the transition to first-time parenthood. Expectant mothers and fathers were administered the Adult Attachment Interview. Adults were classified secure or insecure based on the coherence of their narratives and considered unresolved if they showed signs of mental disorganization (e.g., lapses in reasoning and/or discourse) during discussions of loss and/or abuse. Expectant couples were videotaped discussing whether and how their relationship had changed during pregnancy, how to resolve their greatest source of disagreement, and an activity they could do together. Two raters, blind to all other assessments, coded interactions on four 7-point scales: controlling, affective attunement, balance, and emotional disengagement. One year later, mothers and fathers were then videotaped separately feeding their 8-month old infants for 12-15 minutes. Two coders rated videotapes on the Feeding Scale (Chatoor, et al, 1997) consisting of 46 items rated on 5-pt scales. Factor analyses yielded three dimensions: dyadic reciprocity, noncontingent behavior and struggle for control during feeding.

Husbands’ attachment insecurity (regardless of their wives’ attachment status) predicted less emotionally attuned and balanced exchanges and more negative emotional displays during couple interactions prior to the child’s birth (see Table 1). Wives, but not husbands’, unresolved status was associated with more controlling and dominating couple interactions. During feeding, being married to an insecure spouse compromised the quality of the feeding interactions for both secure mothers and fathers. Secure mothers married to insecure fathers displayed less dyadic reciprocity and more noncontingent behavior (missing baby’s cues) than secure mothers married to secure fathers. Similarly, secure fathers married to insecure mothers scored higher on struggle for control of babies’ food intake than secure fathers married to secure mothers. Finally, mothers and fathers classified as unresolved were more likely to control their baby’s food intake.

Findings underscore the value of looking at the attachment patterns of the whole family, not just individuals or parent-infant dyads. When one spouse is insecure the marital interaction can be as unbalanced as when both are insecure. Similarly, when a mother or father has an insecure spouse, the quality of their feeding interactions with their baby may be compromised.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. McNallie, Jenna. "Cultivating Attachment: The Associations Between Past Television Exposure and Adult Attachment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1109260_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using cultivation and attachment theories as the theoretical frameworks, this study examined two potential mediators in the associations between past television exposure and adult romantic attachment: romantic self-efficacy and a multidimensional scale of perceived realism. The resulting analyses shed light on how television exposure during childhood and adolescence may have long-term impacts on adult attachment dimensions (i.e., attachment anxiety and avoidance). Through the use of an online survey, responses from 695 students from a large Midwestern university were obtained. Findings indicate that early overall and genre-specific television exposure can directly promote both secure (lower attachment avoidance) and insecure (higher attachment anxiety) attachment above the influence of parent and peer attachment; however, these relationships are complex when dimensions of perceived realism and romantic self-efficacy are also considered. These patterns of findings contribute to the body of literature on both attachment theory and cultivation analysis, and offer many directions for future research.

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