Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 6,108 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 1222 - Next  Jump:
2016 - LRA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
1. Anderson, Kate., Hoelting, Megan. and Ambroso, Eric. "Exploring educators’ articulated attitudes and beliefs about linguistically diverse students, teaching, and learning: New methodological possibilities for exploring attitudes-in-context" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA Annual Conference, OMNI Nashville, Nashville, Tennessee, Nov 29, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1143446_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 9088 words || 
Info
2. Gastil, John. and Xenos, Michael. "Of Attitudes and Engagement: Clarifying the Reciprocal Relationship Between Civic Attitudes and Political Participation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p233412_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Research on political efficacy often derives significance from the assumption that it is a major influence on political participation, yet studies suggest that increases in civic engagement can also be, in turn, a cause of heightened efficacy. In this essay, we draw on broader psychological theories of the attitude-behavior relationship to postulate reciprocal patterns of causality between civic attitudes and various forms of political and civic engagement featured in contemporary research in political communication. We then examine the extent of these reciprocal relationships with a two-wave panel survey of 2,872 Pacific Northwest residents. Spanning the 2004 elections, the panel data support the reciprocal model by revealing bi-directional political attitude-behavior relationships, which we discuss further in our conclusion.

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 30 pages || Words: 7883 words || 
Info
3. O'Neil, Naomi Bell., Kline, Susan. and Fay, Martha. "The Socialization of Young Adults’ Love Attitudes Through Family Communication and Parents’ Love Attitudes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p234697_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Families talk about everyday issues from the weather to social concerns (Wood & Duck, 2006); but this study proposes that family communication also socializes about how to express love to others. A sample of 196 matched dyads of undergraduates and one of their parents completed two instruments; the Love Attitudes Scale (Hendrick & Hendrick, 1990) and the Revised Family Communication Patterns Inventory (Ritchie & Fitzpatrick, 1990), along with three open-ended questions about family communication practices. Triangulation of methods revealed a relationship between family communication and all six young adult love attitudes. Fathers’ love attitudes predicted five of six young adult love attitudes: Eros, Ludus, Pragma, Mania, and Agape. Free responses exposed five sources of knowledge about love, including family, friends, media, past relationship experience, and church. Results suggest that fathers may represent an understudied influence on young adult love attitudes, and that family communication may play an important role in the young adults’ preferred expressions of love.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
4. Dorshorst, Emily. "Polarization of Abortion Attitudes: Political Identity, Religious Conservatism, and Gender Attitudes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1254280_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since the 1973 Supreme Court decision in Roe v Wade, public discourse has framed abortion as an issue that is polarized on political lines. However, scholarly literature suggests that Americans have not become more politically polarized since the Court’s decision. Using data from the 1985 to 2014 General Social Survey, this study examines both of these claims by exploring changes over time in abortion attitudes associated with political, social, and religious ideologies. By addressing multiple ideological sources, I explore whether and how different dimensions of liberalisms and conservatisms relate to broader changes in abortion attitudes. The results show that abortion attitudes have indeed become increasingly polarized between liberals and conservatives within the given time period. While political identity, religious beliefs, and gender role attitudes are each directly related to public attitudes about abortion, changes in religious conservatism and traditional gender roles cannot account for this trend. This underscores the importance of political identity relative to other ideological factors in understanding the contours of abortion attitudes in the U.S.

2003 - American Political Science Association Pages: 33 pages || Words: 9261 words || 
Info
5. Xie, Tao. "public support of Death Penalty: Utilitarian Attitude or Symbolic Attitude?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia Marriott Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p63046_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Two theoretical perspectives are proposed to explain American public support for the death penalty. The instrumental perspective argues that public support is determined by such instrumental concerns as crime rate, fear of crime, and perception of crime. The symbolic perspective, on the contrary, holds that death penalty attitudes are symbolic, that is, they are affect-driven and not subject to self-interested considerations. This paper improves on past studies by using both aggregate and individual level data to test the two theories. The findings do not offer conclusive support for either of the two perspectives. The instrumental perspective is supported at the aggregate level and the symbolic perspective is supported at the individual level. We discuss the methodological and theoretical problems that may have contributed to the puzzling findings.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 1222 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy