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Showing 1 through 5 of 929 records.
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2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 7016 words || 
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1. Tal-Or, Nurit. and Papirman, Yael. "The Fundamental Attribution Error in Attributing Fictional Figures' Characteristics to the Actors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p13476_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Two studies attempted to document the occurrence of the psychological phenomenon known as the fundamental attribution error (FAE) in the audiovisual medium. The FAE refers to the human tendency to attribute people's behavior to internal attributes more than external factors. In Study 1, we demonstrated that in the audiovisual medium, viewers tend to attribute an actor’s behavior in television dramas to the actor’s personality, ignoring the existence of a script dictating the actor’s behavior. Study 2 replicated this finding, and also demonstrated that the tendency to make the FAE is related to the degree to which the person reports being transported into the narrative of the TV drama. Furthermore, we showed that the tendency to attribute character traits to the actor is not diminished following exposure to the same actor playing two opposing roles. The last scene viewed was found to determine the evaluation of the actor’s characteristics.

2009 - American Psychology - Law Society Words: 88 words || 
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2. Sperry, Kathryn. and Siegel, Jason. "Attribution Theory Applied to the Courtroom: Sympathy Mediates the Relationship between Jurors’ Blame Attributions and Witness Credibility" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, TBA, San Antonio, TX, Mar 04, 2009 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p295721_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Weiner (1980a, 1980b) posits that our attributions about the causes of others’ situations will influence our emotional reactions towards them (such as sympathy or anger), and it is these emotional reactions which determine our willingness to act on their behalf. The purpose of this paper was to test Weiner’s theory in the context of the courtroom. In the context of a rape case, we found that feelings of sympathy for the victim/witness mediated the relationship between jurors’ attributions of blame (for the rape) and perceptions of her credibility.

2012 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 6976 words || 
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3. Mahone, Jessica. "Attribution, Credibility, and Conspiracy: Source Attribution and the Credibility of Online Conspiracy Theory Media" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p575038_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The openness of the Internet has given alternative political and social movements greater opportunity to disseminate messages to the mass audience than ever before. Using an online survey experiment with 120 participants, this study explores the effects of four levels of source attribution on the perceived credibility of online conspiracy theory media. Findings suggest that attribution has little effect on credibility, but the content of conspiracy theory messages may influence the credibility of attributed sources.

2008 - The Law and Society Association Words: 218 words || 
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4. Hook, Jay. "Attribution of Criminal Responsibility, Sex Differences, and the Ultimate Attribution Error" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Bonaventure, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 27, 2008 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p235677_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: First year Harvard Law students read descriptions of a murder by either a Chinese visiting student or an American postal worker, then rated twelve explanations of the killer's act in terms of the plausibilities of the explanations. Half of the explanations were "dispositional" (e.g. killer an evil person) and half were "situational" (e.g. killer acted because he was under intolerable job stress). The explanations were drawn from actual accounts of murders in Chinese and American newspapers. The data results support social psychology's "ultimate attribution error": that is, Americans endorsed relatively more dispositional explanations of the Chinese killer's act than of the American killer's act. The sex of the rater, however, did not influence the explanation endorsements, except in the sense that it interacted in a complex way with the killer's nationality. In a followup study, the sex of the killer was manipulated so that some law students rated explanations of a female killer's conduct and other law students rated explanations of a male killer's conduct. The sex of the killer did not influence explanation endorsements. Half of the raters had already completed a course in criminal law and half had not. This variable did not influence the relative preference for dispositional or situational explanations of the killer's conduct.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 5828 words || 
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5. Gearhart, Christopher. "3. Attribution of Blame: Using Weiner’s Attribution-Emotion-Intention Model to Explain Interpersonal Forgiveness" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p427387_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This article attempts to demonstrate that the Weiner’s attribution model (1995) may be useful in explaining interpersonal forgiveness. Two independently conducted studies investigate the relationship between victims’ attributions of blame and a desire to forgive. Also, this paper considers how alcohol influences victims’ attributions of blame. Support for Weiner’s (1995) model suggests it is useful for explaining the forgiveness processes. Results also suggest that both drunk and sober offenders were equally held responsible by victims.

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