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2014 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 245 words || 
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1. Paradis, Mark. and Fu, Tse-Min. "Attribution Theory in a Different Context: Comparing Foreign Policy Attributions during the Taiwan Straits Conflict" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Ergife Palace Hotel, Rome, Italy, Jul 04, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p730613_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Misunderstanding the behavior of others can have disastrous consequences. Therefore, several scholars have turned to a prominent theory in social psychology—attribution theory—to explain the causal attributions made by elites for foreign policy events (for example, Larson 1985; Heradstveit and Bonham 1986, 1996). The literature on attributions has identified the ‘fundamental attribution error’ as the tendency to overweight the role of internal personality traits (or dispositional factors) in producing the event and underweight the role of situational causes (Ross 1977; Nisbett and Ross 1980). While generally viewed to be a universal bias, two schools of research in cultural psychology have called its fundamental nature into question. In the first tradition, research pointed to cross-national differences in attributions, with members of individualist cultures (such as the United States) favoring dispositional causal explanations, and members of collectivist cultures (such as China and India) favoring situational attributions (Miller 1985; Morris and Peng 1994). In the second tradition, findings have shown that cultures affect judgment when they are activated by task conditions (Weber and Morris 2010). In this way, individuals can exhibit judgments typical of a more than one culture, depending on the context. Building on this constructivist model of attributions, we propose that attributions made by foreign policy elites are context-dependent, with the audience that the elite is accountable to being the most important contextual factor. In order to test this model, we compare the attributions made by American, Chinese, and Taiwanese elites during the 1995-1996 Taiwan Straits conflict.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: 15 pages || Words: 3287 words || 
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2. Jeong, Se-Hoon. "Attributions in Crisis Communication: A Test of Attribution Model and Situational Crisis Communication Theory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p255839_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This research applies attribution theory and situational crisis communication theory (SCCT) to post-crisis corporate communication research. Attribution theory is used to explain how the public’s responses to a corporation involved in an accident are formed based on their attributions about the accident. SCCT, on the other hand, is used to examine how those attributions can be altered based on communication messages. Consistent with SCCT, high distinctiveness information lead to lower internal attribution about a corporation, and this in turn, resulted in lower public support for punitive actions toward the corporation.

2012 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8351 words || 
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3. Dylko, Ivan. "Documenting Presence of Technological Attributes on User-Generated Content Web Sites With a Quantitative Content Analysis: A Mix-of-Attributes Investigation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, May 24, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p547056_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The present study builds upon the theoretical work of Eveland (2003) who introduced the mix-of-attributes (MOA) approach for theorizing about media effects, and upon the theoretical work of Dylko and McCluskey (in press) who identified five technological attributes of political user-generated content (UGC) to help develop a systematic understanding of the political UGC nature and potential effects. In this study, the most popular political UGC sites are content analyzed to obtain a detailed description of the attribute presence. Cluster analysis is used to develop a theoretically and empirically grounded classification of political UGC. This study shows how the conventional and the attribute-based classifications of UGC differ. Implications of the attributes, attribute-based classification, and the MOA approach are discussed.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Gerardy, Haeli. and Mounts, Nina. "Investigating Hostile Intent Attributions and Aggression: Concordance of Attributions between Mothers and Early Adolescents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p955402_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Despite the large literature on social information processing (SIP) and aggression (Crick & Dodge; 1994), relatively little is known about parental contributions to child SIP. A small body of research supports parent-child SIP transmission (see MacBrayer, Milich, & Hundley, 2003), although evidence is limited. The current investigation examined one aspect of SIP, hostile intent attributions (HIA), and aggression, in an early-adolescent sample. Two questions were of interest: 1) Are there sex of child, reporter (mother vs. child), or sex of child by reporter differences in HIA? 2) Are mothers’ HIA regarding children's peers related to adolescents’ aggressive behaviors?

The sample included 68 mothers and early adolescents (50% boys; Mage = 12.41) from a midsized city in the Midwestern U.S. Families were 54.8% Caucasian, 26% African-American, 15.1% Hispanic, and 22.1% other/mixed race. Approximately half of mothers were college-educated.

A modified version of the attributions and feelings of distress questionnaire (Crick et al., 2002; Bailey & Ostrov, 2008) assessed mothers’ and adolescents’ intent attributions regarding adolescents' peers. Hypothetical scenarios described ambiguously intended, negative interactions between the adolescent and a peer (5 instrumental, e.g., peer broke child’s iPod; and 5 relational, e.g., peer did not invite child to party). Adolescents responded whether the peer was trying to be mean and chose one reason for the behavior from a list of two hostile or benign options. Mothers answered whether the peer was trying to be mean and provided open-ended responses regarding the reason for the behavior. Mothers’ responses were coded by two independent raters using guidelines from Bickett et al. (1996) and MacBrayer et al. (2003); Cohen’s K was 1.00. All intent attribution responses were scored as 0 = non-hostile and 1 = hostile. Mean attribution scores for instrumental and relational stories were calculated for mothers (αinstrumental = .75, α relational = .60) and adolescents (αinstrumental = .77, α relational = .58). Higher scores indicate more HIA. The Child Social Behavior Scale (Crick & Grotpeter, 1995) tapped adolescents’ aggressive behavior, including 6 items for overt aggression (physical and verbal composite, α = .86) and 6 items for relational aggression (α = .74).

Repeated measures ANOVAs revealed that adolescents endorsed more HIA than mothers, particularly for relational scenarios; although, adolescents and mothers each endorsed more HIA for relational, compared to instrumental, scenarios (Figure 1). Two regressions tested the contribution of mothers’ HIA to adolescents' HIA; instrumental and relational HIA were tested separately. For instrumental scenarios, more maternal HIA were related to more adolescent HIA, β = .35, B = .30, p = .003. Two regressions also tested the contribution of mothers’ HIA to adolescent aggression. Mothers’ instrumental HIA interacted with adolescent sex in the contribution of overt aggression (p = .084). For boys only, more maternal HIA was related to higher levels of adolescent overt aggression, b = .56, t(64) = 2.11, p = .039 (Figure 2). Results provide support for the transmission of hostile attributions from mothers to adolescents.

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 7016 words || 
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5. Tal-Or, Nurit. and Papirman, Yael. "The Fundamental Attribution Error in Attributing Fictional Figures' Characteristics to the Actors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p13476_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Two studies attempted to document the occurrence of the psychological phenomenon known as the fundamental attribution error (FAE) in the audiovisual medium. The FAE refers to the human tendency to attribute people's behavior to internal attributes more than external factors. In Study 1, we demonstrated that in the audiovisual medium, viewers tend to attribute an actor’s behavior in television dramas to the actor’s personality, ignoring the existence of a script dictating the actor’s behavior. Study 2 replicated this finding, and also demonstrated that the tendency to make the FAE is related to the degree to which the person reports being transported into the narrative of the TV drama. Furthermore, we showed that the tendency to attribute character traits to the actor is not diminished following exposure to the same actor playing two opposing roles. The last scene viewed was found to determine the evaluation of the actor’s characteristics.

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