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2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Zhou, Shuo. and Shapiro, Michael. "Impacts of a Character’s Morality on Audience Perspective Taking and Audience Explanations for Character Behavior" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1108992_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The current study examines the effects of character morality on audience members’ perspective taking processes. Through two experiments, we find people tend to take an actor’s perspective when interpreting moral characters, indicated by higher level of egocentric projection into the character, identification with the character, paying closer attention to their unintentional behaviors, and providing more mechanical causes to explain these behaviors. In contrast, when processing immoral characters, people tend to take an observer’s perspective by focusing more on intentional behaviors. This research extends our understanding of the role of character morality in narrative processing and conditions under which people would use different mental inference strategies to understand a media character.

2009 - International Communication Association Words: 225 words || 
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2. Sender, Katherine. "Media Audience Studies and Consumption: Audience Response to Product Placement in the Makeover Reality Genre" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p298339_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Both popular press and scholarly critics of makeover television shows worry that these programs situate self-help or -improvement expressly in the context of consumption: advertising, product placement, and the show's own branded products litter the shows and related publicity. To what extent, however, do audiences engage with these commercial appeals? This paper draws from a large audience research study of four makeover television shows: The Biggest Loser, Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, Starting Over, and What Not to Wear. We asked regular viewers of the shows whether they remembered advertised or placed products from the shows, whether they had purchased any of these, and whether they had bought books and DVDs associated with the shows. Most respondents said that they did not buy products advertised or featured on these shows, and they were highly critical of clumsy product placement. Nor did they buy the show's related media very often; sometimes they critiqued the shows for withholding information in order to make people buy the book or DVD. For all the legitimate concerns about escalating commercialism of reality television, there may be cause for optimism concerning viewers' actual buying behavior, even if they do not reject consumerism per se. Only by engaging with audiences of media forms such as makeover television can we begin to assess the impact of advertising and product placement on viewers.

2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Words: 184 words || 
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3. Navar-Gill, Annemarie. "Selling Audience Analytics: Television Data Services, Knowledge Construction, and the Industrial Audience Imaginary" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, <Not Available>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1231045_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: The television industry has always needed to measure and conceptualize its audience to survive. In today’s fragmented media market, the aggregated exposure statistics described in critical terms by scholars like Ien Ang (1991) and Eileen Meehan (1990) have morphed into something vastly more complex. Social media is only one of the many sources of deep, granular, and individualizable information about audiences available to the industry today, but a variety of companies—both start-ups and extensions of established audience measurement firms—have arisen to provide networks with the tools to process and interpret large quantities of information gathered from social feeds. Though the inner workings of such tools are largely concealed behind proprietary algorithms, I argue that the strategies these companies use to explain, visually represent, and market a need for their services offer a valuable lens for exploring how audience knowledge and the industrial audience imaginary are being reconstructed around digital technologies.


Annemarie Navar-Gill is a PhD candidate in Communication Studies at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on technology and labor in media industries. She is a former writer for the television series Gossip Girl.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: 17 pages || Words: 3817 words || 
Info
4. Cooper, Roger. and Tang, Tang. "Audience Availability to Television: Toward a Measurement Utility to Explain Audience Behavior" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p259264_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study sought to advance understanding and utility of audience availability by testing the concept at the individual-viewer level and by comparing assessments of availability across five measurement conditions. Participants were available to watch television significantly more than they actually watched television. ANOVA indicated significant differences among these five measures—general estimates, two-hour estimates, one-hour estimates, 30-minute estimates, and diary.

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