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2010 - The Law and Society Association Words: 171 words || 
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1. Cross, Remy. "Bending Authority: The Strategic Role of Police Authority in Movement and Countermovement Dynamics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Renaissance Chicago Hotel, Chicago, IL, May 27, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-12-05 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p412804_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Most work on protest policing examines the issue from the perspective of the police, occasionally activists offer their opinions regarding the more repressive actions of the police but activist accounts of protest policing seldom go beyond this. Yet we know that movement organizations and activists are savvy towards their environment and highly adaptive when it comes to taking advantage of anything that might give them a strategic edge. So how is it that the police, who are nearly always present at a protest event, are not considered as potentially useful strategic assets for movements?

I would argue that the police are, in fact, often used by protesters in ways that give the protesters' strategic advantage particularly in situations where there are both demonstrators and counter-demonstrators, or at a minimum an entity that actively stands in opposition to the protest.

Drawing upon participant observation I discuss the role of the police from the perspective of the street level protesters and what advantages they can confer upon savvy protesters engaged in face to face confrontations.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Larsen, Lars. "The Medical Profession as Health Policy Authority: Claims and Challenges to Professional Authority in Comparative Perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-05 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1120361_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A 1934 declaration from the American Medical Association famously argued that “All features of medical service in any method of medical practice should be under the control of the medical profession”. The organization of health care is no longer simply an organ for the exercise of medical professional power, but also designed to control this power. Despite the controls on medical autonomy, however, studies continuously document cases of ‘professional capture’.

This accentuates the need to not simply document the policy activities of medical associations, but also to understand how the medical profession (re-)constitutes itself as authority on health policy. How is the authority to prescribe health policy reclaimed in health policy contexts where medical interests are no longer sovereign, but have increasingly been contained in control systems, managed care, patient rights, etc.? And do different health care systems – state- or market-centered – enable different positions for professional authority over health policy?

Drawing on Starr’s (1982) classic study of ‘social’ and ‘cultural’ authority in American medicine, this paper compares authority claims made by the medical profession across three countries over 60 years (1950-2010). The data for this interpretive study comprises editorials published in the medical profession’s leading journal in each country, JAMA in the US, the BMJ in the UK, and the Ugeskrift for læger in Denmark. A total of 975 editorials have been content coded and subjected to qualitative analysis in order to show how the medical profession reacts to having its authority challenged.

2018 - Twenty-Second Annual Conference of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Dibbs, Rebecca. "Authority Dynamics of Preservice Middle School Teachers During Group Work Pencasts: Authority vs. Influence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Twenty-Second Annual Conference of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators, The Westin Galleria Houston, Houston, Texas, Feb 08, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-05 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1291571_index.html>
Publication Type: Brief Report
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This case study explored the development of authority, influence, and participation during group work. A discourse analysis was performed to discover several relationships among three different theoretical frameworks. These relationships have critical implications for both practitioners and researchers.

2008 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 211 words || 
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4. Schaler, Claudia. "Rousseau's Images of Authority: Freedom, Authority, and Moral Agency" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA, Nov 13, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-12-05 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p276693_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Rousseau's attitude toward authority has taken a backseat to his conception of freedom. Judith Shklar is a most striking exception to this rule. Her treatment of Rousseau's "Images of Authority," in Men and Citizens, paints a rather illiberal picture, and yet she persistently asserts Rousseau's relevance to the liberal cause. This paper rejects Shklar's portrait of Rousseau as a skeptical utopian but affirms his relevance to liberal political thought. Rousseau requires us to consider questions of moral psychology to arrive at a subject, a moral agent, capable of exercising freedom. Political freedom cannot be relegated to matters of constitutions, institutions, or regimes alone, according to Rousseau, but instead depends on decidedly illiberal authority relations as a precondition for any civil freedom at all. To exercise freedom, man's weak individual will must become strong. Achieving moral and political autonomy required a remedy for the will in "liberating authorities." This paper focuses on Emile and its unfinished sequel, Emile et Sophie. Primarily through the relationship between Emile and his tutor, I outline Rousseau's conception of liberating authority and the obstacles to freedom it aims to surmount. While the costs of Rousseau's solutions may be too high, Rousseau nonetheless poses questions liberals must also confront.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 2 pages || Words: 248 words || 
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5. Deflem, Mathieu., Mahoney, James., Alldredge, Penney., Larson, Erik. and Lyons, Kimberly. "Book (Author) Meets Dissertation (Authors): Policing World Society, by Mathieu Deflem (Oxford University Press, 2002)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-12-05 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p108550_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This roundtable provides a forum for discussion on Mathieu Deflem’s Policing World Society: Historical Foundations of International Police Cooperation (Oxford University Press, 2002). The book’s author is exposed to the learned feedback from students who are at various stages of completion towards their dissertation. As Deflem’s book is also a reworking of his dissertation, the roundtable will serve as the starting point for both scholarly as well as professional themes of discussion.

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