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2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10799 words || 
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1. Van Gunten, Tod. "A Paradox of Bureaucratic Autonomy: Central Bank Legitimacy, Autonomy and Commitment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p722853_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Inflation targeting is the latest development in an iterative series of institutional attempts to insulate monetary policy from electoral politics. While standard theories of the political economy of money rest on the paradigm of credible commitments, I adopt an alternative approach based on a sociological approach to organizational legitimacy. Institutional mechanisms of central bank commitment are only effective to the extent that political leaders accept the legitimacy of autonomous central banks. This gives rise to a paradox of bureaucratic autonomy: institutional constraint on executives is conditional on acceptance of these constraints. I explore this paradox through an examination of the political economy of commitment to transparent inflation targets in developing countries. Inflation targets were adopted in Mexico, whereas commitment was proposed but rejected in Argentina. I suggest that central banks have committed to targets when they suffer from deficits of organizational legitimacy and when their embeddedness in bureaucratic networks within the state facilitates inter-organizational elite collective action. In contrast, commitment is undermined by the absence of elite structures that facilitate elite cooperation.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 9292 words || 
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2. Ornebring, Henrik., Lindell, Johan., Clerwall, Christer. and Karlsson, Michael. "Autonomy From the Inside: Journalists’ Perceptions of Workplace Autonomy in Five European Countries" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p979678_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines how journalists perceive workplace autonomy in five European countries, based on an email survey (N = 2,238) conducted in Britain, Germany, Italy, Sweden and Estonia. The paper argues that the workplace level functions as a link between the macro level of external pressures and the micro level of perceived influences on newswork. Using principal component analysis we explore the dimensionality of workplace autonomy based on a set of 20 survey questions. Regression analysis is then used on the dimensions found in order to determine what affects perception of autonomy in the different dimensions. The most salient explanatory variables are found on the country and organizational levels, whereas the variables age, experience, gender, managerial role and medium have no or limited effects. The results show the organizational and country levels being integrated and that and that media system/journalistic culture is the most salient factor explaining perception of autonomy.

2006 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 37 words || 
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3. Bhasin, Tavishi. "Responses to Demands for Autonomy: Cultural Autonomy, Carvation, Secession" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p138814_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Using game theory, we show that the concessions granted by the central government to demands for greater autonomy depend on discount rates, expected electoral gains, economic clout, and ethnic heterogeneity. We test the hypotheses on multiple cases.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Pages: 16 pages || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Bhasin, Tavishi. and Liu, Amy. "Local Autonomy, Carvation, and Secession: Explaining National Government Responses to Autonomy Demands" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p180619_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: What explains national government responses to autonomy demands? The existing literature has focused on either the granting of local autonomy or complete secession from the state. In this paper, we incorporate a third possible option: Carvation?the creation of a subnational unit with its own legislature, fiscal jurisdiction, and representation in the national legislature?is a common institutional arrangement across various countries but has received little attention in the literature. We argue that studying these responses separately assumes each of these to be mutually independent of the others. We present a four-type scale for autonomy granted: (a) no local autonomy; (b) the formation of local councils to devise local policies; (c) the creation of a subnational unit with its own legislature, fiscal jurisdiction, and representation in the national legislature; and (d) complete political and economic independence from the national state. Employing a game theoretic model, we demonstrate that the type of autonomy granted depends on (a) the government?s belief of the demander?s strength, (b) the cost of war for both the government and the demander, (c) the demander?s capacity under the new type of autonomy, (d) the reputation costs the government incurs by granting new levels of autonomy, and (e) the type of autonomy under the status quo. We test our derived hypotheses on three cases from India where the outcomes have all been different: Uttaranchal (carvation), Bodoland (local autonomy), and Telangana (no autonomy).

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