Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 338 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 68 - Next  Jump:
2003 - American Political Science Association Pages: 47 pages || Words: 15701 words || 
Info
1. Burbach, David. "Rally 'Round the Flag, or Run Away, Run Away? Public Support for Military Intervention, 1953-2000" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia Marriott Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p64412_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 152 words || 
Info
2. Baek, Hyunin. and Losavio, Michael. "The Impact of Negative Stimuli and Negative Emotion on Running Away from Home: Delinquency and Crime While Away from Home" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Nov 16, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1144504_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines their negative situations hypothesized by the General Strain Theory (GST), such as parental negative punishment with the mediating effect of negative emotion. To analyze the hypothesis, the current study used the data from a Korean survey about the 9,750 adolescent students in 2009. Structural Equation Model (SEM) was conducted to examine a possible mediating role of negative emotions. The research results showed that the poor relationship with family and parent abuse increases the level of depression. In particular, the level of depression which was experienced by juveniles influences the likelihood of running away from home. Therefore, this study supports the GST hypothesis of negative stimuli impacting juvenile delinquency with a mediation effect of negative emotion. This study also finds that the more adolescents run away from home, the greater the member of juveniles committing deviant and criminal behaviors. Thus, it is important to remove negative stimuli in family environment.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Pages: 33 pages || Words: 9139 words || 
Info
3. Plazek, David. "Does Moving Away from Consensualism Lead to a Walk on the Wild Side? The Case of Italy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p179856_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper investigates the evolution of Italian governmental institutions since World War II. During the Cold War, Italy maintained consensual institutions in a fragmented polity. The end of the Cold War coincided with significant Italian electoral reforms that were a move away from consensualism. The research examines the affect this institutional shift has had on foreign policy outputs. The increased governmental stability associated with the new electoral ?cartel? system is found to provide greater executive freedom in foreign policy decision-making. Moreover, leadership appears to have greater leeway to pursue unpopular policies, such as Berlusconi?s decision to join ?the coalition of the willing? in Iraq. Although multiple variables have influenced Italian foreign policy over the past 60 years, the findings here suggest that power concentrations brought on by institutionally increasing the power of the executive can lend themselves to the pursuit of more aggressive foreign policies.

2006 - American Studies Association Words: 145 words || 
Info
4. Wu, Cynthia. "“Finishing the Dissertation Away from the Home Institution”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113878_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Doctoral candidates increasingly find themselves completing their dissertations away from their home institution due to a number of factors. Many—if not most—of these students will experience levels of isolation, frustration, and resource deprivation as they attempt to finish dissertation writing in another location. My remarks will fall into three main categories: (1) how to maintain relationships with dissertation committee members while at a distance; (2) how to find an intellectual community and university resources in the graduate student’s new location; (3) how to balance the responsibilities of teaching with dissertation writing if the graduate student has academic employment elsewhere. I hope to be able to encourage all ABD’s in this position to create their own professional support network to facilitate completion, and I will speak about my own experiences as a former dissertation fellow at Macalester College in order to illustrate examples.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 26 pages || Words: 7618 words || 
Info
5. Avant, Deborah. and Haufler, Virginia. "Running Scared, Running Away, or Reaching Out: Non-State Actors Defining Security" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p251497_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Security—and insecurity—traditionally is defined by the state as national security. Borders, citizens, and national interests must be protected with policies at home and abroad. In recent years, some have argued that we need to look at human security instead, focusing on the individual. We argue here instead for the need to pay attention to the security of organizations. We start with the observation that many non-state actors now operate abroad in weakly governed territories, where they confront a number of legal, political and physical security challenges. How do they define and prioritize the threats they face? How do they respond? This paper explores a number of preliminary hypotheses about security from the standpoint of corporations and humanitarian, conservation and development NGOs, both of which engage in security planning. We know little about exactly what they see as the threat and how they deploy their resources to respond. We seek to bridge the divide between studies of industry within the international business studies and international political economy tradition, and new research on NGOs within international relations and sociology. In addition, we seek to bring security studies into a broader research agenda.We derive hypotheses about how the mission, structure, and resources of an organization shape the definition of threat, and the response of non-state actors to threats. We speculate that non-state actors likely to define threats in narrow terms related directly to their physical situation. They are also likely to respond to insecurity by trying to re-shape the socio-political environment through engagement with all actors in a conflict, instead of taking sides. They may, however, suffer a disconnect between the security situation as defined by headquarters versus leaders on the ground. They seek to preserve their mission, be it the delivery of conservation, development, or humanitarian aid or the pursuit of economic ends. Ultimately, they must adopt some combination of protection of their personnel, facilities, and mission from direct threat; withdrawal from an unmanageable and unstable situation; or reconstruction of the environment in ways that reduce the threat. How they respond may affect the local political environment (as we have seen for some time with Shell and various groups in Nigeria and in recent revelations concerning Chiquita Brands and other companies and their payments to paramilitaries in Colombia), as well as have implications for the foreign policy goals of their home states.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 68 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy