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2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 6743 words || 
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1. Khang, Hyoungkoo. "Framing “Axis of Evil”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-11-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112391_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examined the news frames employed by the New York Times in covering Iraq and North Korea labeled as “axis of evil.” Based on the findings that pro-military action frames frequently appeared in the coverage of Iraq, while pro-diplomatic solution frames frequently used in covering North Korea, the New York Times frequently used certain words or phrases, and sources in the article to organize central themes or ideas in the coverage of the two countries.

2004 - The Law and Society Association Words: 157 words || 
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2. Millbank, Jenni. "The Virgin Mary as Axis of Desire" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Renaissance Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, May 27, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-11-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p116715_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper will analyze classic feminist literature which concerns reproductive freedom as a central issue. It will particularly focus upon utopian and anti-utopian fiction such as Woman on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy and The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood, but will also counterpoint early radical feminist texts such as those by Sulamith Firestone and Valerie Solanas. These texts engage in different ways with the idea of woman-only or miraculous reproduction - some construe technology as controlled by patriarchal-scientific forces while others envisage a utopian future in which women’s equality is gained through freedom from reproduction enabled by new technologies. Whether intentional or not, these competing views on reproductive technologies can be read through the myth of the Virgin birth and feminist response to it: miraculous promises of freedom or another form of patriarchal control. They can also be read with and against the ideals of the Christian groups to whom they are opposed.

2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 3176 words || 
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3. Noy, Chaim. "“Axi, Ma- Ze Nishma Kemo Shem Aravi Ma” (Bro, What- it Sound Like an Arabic Name, What): The Hebrew Discourse Marker Ma in Spoken and Written Interactions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p637273_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In recent years we have seen a truly impressive proliferation in the research of discourse markers (DMs). This proliferation is partly the outcome of the different perspectives on DMs, and the different types of interest that they arouse: pragmatics, interaction (specifically interactional sociolinguistics), grammaticalization processes, politeness studies, and so on. In this research we suggest an exploration of DMs-in-interaction, with a specific focus on the interaction and other functions that DMs fulfill with regards to presenting questions. we will also inquire into the function of DMs in Hebrew talk and interaction, and thus contributing to an overall comparative discussion (Maschler & Dori-Hacohen, 2012).

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 469 words || 
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4. Hostinar, Camelia. and Gunnar, Megan. "Developmental Changes in the Social Buffering of the HPA Axis by Caregivers in Humans" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-11-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p955531_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: Prior research on the social buffering of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis has concentrated heavily on adulthood or infancy, but much less is known about changes across development and how they are shaped by social experience. This talk will present an integrative review of the development of social buffering of HPA stress reactivity in humans, from infancy to adolescence, including recent experimental findings.

During early development, parents are powerful stress-regulators for children, but fearful infant temperament also plays a role and interacts with attachment security to predict the magnitude of stress responses to fear or pain stimuli (e.g., inoculations) in 12- to 18-month-olds, such that infants who are both temperamentally fearful and insecurely attached to their parents tend to exhibit the most pronounced cortisol reactivity to these challenges. Interestingly, maternal presence does not prevent salivary cortisol elevations to inoculations in 2-, 4-, and 6-month-olds, suggesting that a certain level of neurocognitive development and a more solid organization of the attachment system may be needed before these social buffering effects can be instantiated.

Our recent work also indicates that parent support remains a potent stress buffer into late childhood (ages 9-10), being able to almost completely block children’s reactivity to a laboratory social-evaluative stressor (a modified Trier Social Stress Test, TSST). Notably, support from friendly strangers before the TSST did not show these effects on children’s reactivity (Authors, 2014). However, parent support seemed to lose its effectiveness as a buffer of the HPA axis for adolescents, who displayed robust cortisol responses to the experimental stressor regardless of whether they prepared for the TSST with the parent or a stranger (Authors, 2014). A recent follow-up study explores the extent to which pubertal onset and age-related changes in social development may play a role in this developmental switch (Authors, in prep).

In addition to describing what is known about the normative developmental course of social buffering of the HPA axis in humans, we will also discuss the critical role of early-life social experiences for shaping the later potency of caregiver support in mitigating HPA reactivity. These studies use a natural experiment that follows children adopted internationally from orphanages, who experience social deprivation early in life, but very supportive family environments post-adoption. Using a similar laboratory-based experimental paradigm to manipulate the provision of parent versus stranger support before the TSST, results indicated that early-life social deprivation was associated with an absence of preferential HPA-buffering effects with support from parents compared to strangers in 9-10-year-olds (Authors, under review). This study suggests that exposure to neglect and adversity during what may be sensitive periods for the development of social bonds may shape neurobehavioral development in ways that reduce selective responses to caregivers versus strangers. These results may have implications for children’s ability to fully benefit from parental support as a coping resource in times of stress.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 497 words || 
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5. Rudolph, Karen. and Troop-Gordon, Wendy. "Joint Contribution of HPA Axis Regulation and Motivation to Adolescent Depression" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-11-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p957134_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: Neuroscience theories of depression implicate dysregulation of arousal (HPA activation; Hankin, Badanes, Abela, & Watamura, 2010) and motivation (approach-avoidance) (Carver, Johnson, & Joorman, 2008) systems in risk for disorder. In school-age children, research links blunted HPA activation with depression (Hankin et al., 2010). Moreover, underactivation of the approach system and overactivation of the avoidance system have been implicated in youth depression (Coplan, Wilson, Frohlick, & Zelenski, 2006). However, research typically considers arousal and motivation systems in isolation and relies on concurrent designs. This study used a longitudinal design to examine the interactive contribution of HPA activation (indexed with cortisol) during middle childhood and approach-avoidance motivation (indexed with a behavioral measure) to adolescent depression. Given adolescent girls’ heightened risk for depression, we examined potential sex differences.
In 3rd grade, pairs of youth (64 girls, 66 boys; M age= 9.46, SD =.33; 72% White) completed an in vivo social stressor with two challenges: negotiation of insufficient materials and distribution of unequal prizes. Two cortisol indexes were examined: anticipatory (prior to the task, after youth were told they would interact with an unfamiliar peer) and reactive (20 min. post – pre task). Youth reported on depressive symptoms (SMFQ). In 6th grade, youth completed measures of approach (BAS) and avoidance (BIS) and a semi-structured interview (MINI) assessing depression.
Separate analyses were conducted using Mplus (Muthén & Muthén, 1998-2007) for anticipatory vs. reactive cortisol and BAS vs. BIS. For reactivity analyses, the cluster option was used to account for nesting within dyads. Predictors were entered in the following steps to predict 6th grade depression: (1) time of sampling, medication, sex, and 3rd grade depression; (2) main effects (HPA activation, motivation); (3) two-way interactions; (4) HPA x Motivation x Sex interaction (reported in text, if significant). Significant Cortisol Reactivity x BAS x Sex (β = .25, p = .013) and Anticipatory Cortisol x BIS (Table 1) interactions emerged. Although heightened cortisol reactivity predicted moderate levels of depression in girls with high approach (b = 3.39, p < .001), the highest levels of depression were predicted by blunted cortisol reactivity in girls with low approach (b = -4.84, p < .09) (Figure 1a); reactivity did not predict depression in boys with low or high approach (bs < .48, ns). Blunted anticipatory cortisol predicted depression in youth with high (b = -3.10, p =.02) but not low (b = 1.94, ns) avoidance (Figure 1b).
These results suggest youth with blunted stress reactivity are at heightened risk for adolescent depression in the context of low approach (specifically girls) and high avoidance motivation. Such youth may be quick to disengage from even mild social challenges, triggering social isolation and depression. This disengagement may be particularly problematic during critical social transitions, such as entrance into middle school, when social networks are reorganized. Of note, heightened stress reactivity also predicted depression in girls with high approach, suggesting distinct pathways to depression. This research highlights the importance of considering joint effects of arousal and motivation systems in assessment and intervention with depressed youth. 

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