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2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 31 pages || Words: 8375 words || 
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1. Fettes, Danielle. and McLeod, Jane. "Bad Kid, Bad Parents, Bad Genes, or All of the above?: Understanding How Adults Define Children's Mental Health Problems" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p22772_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The last decade has witnessed an outpouring of interest in children’s emotional and behavioral problems from media outlets, the medical profession, and allied mental health disciplines. Little scholarly attention has been given to how the diverse claims of these stakeholders are used by adults to construct a lay understanding of children’s mental health problems. Drawing on social constructionist and claims-making traditions, we analyze the competing frameworks that emerge in public discourse on children’s emotional and behavioral problems. Specifically, using vignette-based data from the 2002 General Social Survey’s National Stigma Study – Children Module, we conduct a latent class analysis of causal attributions for three types of childhood problems: daily trouble, ADHD, and depression. We then evaluate the predictors of those attributions, including characteristics of the child, whether respondents label the problem a mental illness, and respondents’ socio-demographic characteristics. We find that adults construct children’s mental health problems in a manner consistent with public frameworks. And, while socio-demographic characteristics do little to predict group differences, several interesting patterns emerge with regard to the characteristics of the child.

2013 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 130 words || 
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2. Groff, Elizabeth. and Haberman, Cory. "Crime in and around Neighborhood Parks: Bad Parks, Bad Neighborhoods, or Both?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p667236_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Neighborhood parks in urban areas are public spaces that provide a variety of recreational opportunities for residents in a natural environment. At the same time, they can become staging areas for illegal and disorderly activities. Systematic social observations describing park characteristics, US Census data quantifying neighborhood social composition, community surveys capturing social cohesion, and official crime data are analyzed using multilevel models to examine: 1) whether activity generating features of parks explain differences in crime levels across parks; 2) whether differences in parks’ neighborhood context explain differences in crime levels across parks; and 3) the extent to which park characteristics as opposed to neighborhood context explain differences in crime levels across parks. Our results are discussed in terms of their implications for theories of crime and place.

2012 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 9401 words || 
Info
3. Flener, Katrina. "Breaking Drug War Hegemony or Reinforcing the Bad? Illicit Drug Discourses in AMC’s Breaking Bad" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p582961_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the first four seasons of AMC’s critically-acclaimed series Breaking Bad in terms of its representations of illicit drug use, the drug trade, and associated policy considerations. Relying on critical discourse analysis, this research attempts to understand how the basic cable series supports and/or challenges dominant ideology about illicit drug use, the drug trade (both here and in Mexico), and the United States’ drug war policies.

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