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2006 - International Studies Association Words: 542 words || 
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1. Lefebvre, Jeffrey. "Turkey's Good Neighbor Policy: Small POwer Resistance to the U.S. Unipolar Bandwagon" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p100756_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: A question that should be of interest to both IR theorists and policymakers concerns the impact of the international system on the foreign policies of smaller powers. Will small powers, particularly those located in strategically vital regions be pressured to subordinate their policy interests to serve Washington's agenda? During the Cold War, the bipolar system offered weak power the gambit of playing the two superpowers against each other in order to fend off pressure or in seeking greater rewards (i.e., military and economic aid). With the emergence of the unipolar system in the 1990s this "balancing" or "counterbalancing" strategy option apparently vanished. One might now expect that states, especialy those who have been dependent upon maintaining the goodwill of the United States, will feel pressured to bandwagon and support Washington's unipolar agenda in the war on international terrorism. In the case of the Middle East that has meant support for the invasion and occupation of Iraq and the isolation of the regimes in Syria and Iran. One country located in the strategically vital Middle Easr region and a long-time ally and U.S. aid recipient has opposed U.S. policy on these issues--the Republic of Turkey. On March 1, 2003 the Turkish National Assembly (parliament) voted overwhelmingly to reject the Bush administration's request to allow U.S. forces to cross Turkish territory in order to open a second front in northern Iraq and use Turkish military bases to provide logistical support and conduct air strikes. Furthermore, since the March 2003 invasion of Iraq, Ankara has moved to improve relations with Syria and Iran, who also share an interest with Turkey as to how the "Kurdish question" plays out in Iraq.Through a close examination of the Turkish and international press as well as public policy statements by U.S. and Turkish officials, this paper will explore the reasons why Turkey has opposed U.S. policies and successfully resisted U.S. pressures to toe Washington's foreign policy line in the region. The author will argue that Turkish behavior and the Bush administration's, heretofore, refusal to undertake any punitive actions against Turkey, except for some angry public tongue-lashings by U.S. officials and the "neocon" community is he result of the interplay of global, regional, and domestic forces that mitigated the 'bandwagon pull' of a small state living in a unipolar world. First, the European Community (EU) offers Turkey a political and economic alternative to the United States in an international political-economic order that is multipolar in nature. Second, the invasion of Iraq unleashed a force (Kurdish nationalism) Anakara fears, more than Washington, will destablize Turkey and the region. Third, the Bush administration's claim to be spreading democracy to the Middle East would be exposed as a fraud and an act of blatant hypocrisy by punishing a government for adopting a foreign policy decided through a legitimate democratic process and reflected the will of the Turkish people. Thus, Turkey's resistance to the 'bandwagon pull' of the unipolar world stems from three overlapping issues: 1) Turkey's anticipated accession to the EU; 2) domestic and regional security concerns raised by the "opening" of the Kurdish question in Iraq; and 3) The on-going process of political and economic reforms in Turkey that have diminished the influence of the powerful, and generally pro-U.S., Turkish military establishment.

2008 - MPSA Annual National Conference Pages: 23 pages || Words: 4621 words || 
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2. Francisco, Ronald. "Now is the Time, Here is the Place: The Varied Dynamics of Bandwagon Mobilization" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual National Conference, Palmer House Hotel, Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 03, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p267807_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Paper investigates the processes by which bandwagons influence mobilization and examines the dynamic stability of the bandwagon process.

2008 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 33 pages || Words: 12007 words || 
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3. Berger, Guy. and Mathurine, Jude. "Problematizing “media development” as a bandwagon gets rolling" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 06, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p272469_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: International initiatives have gained momentum around analysing "media development" - a notion related to, but generally distinct from, media's contribution to "development". The focus on the "development" of media largely concerns international support of media in non-dense media environments. The normative character of work done to date can however be interrogated, and located against historical backdrop. Critical theorization of "media" and "development" shows the need to go beyond the legacy of old thinking about old media.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 176 words || 
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4. Sotirin, Patricia. "Passing Bandwagons: Theoretical Fads, Fabulous Insights, and the Illusory Stability of Ethnographic Concepts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p367182_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper considers the instability and flux of those conceptual mainstays that seem to anchor ethnographic study as well as the popularity of alternative conceptualizations. I consider such questions as: How have our claims to ethnographic authenticity changed the nature of our ethnographies? How can we account for the emerging importance of ethnographic reflexivity? Have such recently popular theoretical perspectives as poststructuralism, postmodernism, and post-empiricism changed what we do and who we are as communication ethnographers or have these been passing fads? The idea that the popularity of particular academic concepts and perspectives ebbs and wanes is not new but what I want to consider here is what the illusory stability of key concepts like authenticity or realist representations means for ethnographic study in communication: do we have traditions worth maintaining or not? Does the instability of key concepts in the ethnographic tradition offer a basis for recovering and revising its key concepts or is that tradition passé and deservedly dead and gone along with its unreflective allegiances (imperialism, racism, misogyny, capitalism, elitism, and so on)?

2012 - BISA-ISA JOINT INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE "DIVERSITY IN THE DISCIPLINE: TENSION OR OPPORTUNITY IN RESPONDING TO GLOBAL" Words: unavailable || 
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5. Bouchet, Nicolas. "Mainstreaming and bandwagoning: the Fragile State Group within the OECD" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BISA-ISA JOINT INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE "DIVERSITY IN THE DISCIPLINE: TENSION OR OPPORTUNITY IN RESPONDING TO GLOBAL", Old Town district of Edinburgh, Edinburgh Scotland UK, Jun 20, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p599951_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

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