Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 7,775 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 1555 - Next  Jump:
2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 7217 words || 
Info
1. Lee, Seungcheol. and Liang, Yuhua. "Reciprocity in Computer-Human Interaction: Source-Based, Norm-Based, and Affect-Based Explanations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p716238_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Individuals often apply social rules when they interact with computers, or known as the Computer are Social Actors effect. Following previous work, one approach to understand the mechanism responsible for CASA is to utilize computer agents and have the agents attempt to gain compliance from human partners. The current study focuses on three key factors frequently cited to influence traditional notions of compliance: normative influence (e.g., reciprocity), evaluations toward the source (e.g., competence and warmth), and affective influence (e.g., mood). Structural equation modeling tested a path model to assess the effects of these factors on human compliance to computer request. The final model suggested that normative influence (e.g., receiving help from a computer agent) increased the likelihood of compliance. On the other hand, evaluations toward the computer agent, specifically perceived competence and warmth, did not significantly influence compliance. The discussion includes implications for practitioners and directions for future research.

2009 - SCRA Biennial Meeting Words: 306 words || 
Info
2. Abdul-Adil, Jaleel., Carothers, Kristin., Farmer, Jr., A. David., Tolan, Patrick., Taylor-Crawford, MD, Karen., Bell, Carl. and Williamson, John. "Disseminating Evidence Based Interventions to Multiple Contexts: Collaborations Between University Based and Community Based Agencies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SCRA Biennial Meeting, Montclair State University, Montclair, New Jersey, Jun 18, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p302427_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Policy makers and researchers are aware that empirically supported treatments and evidence based practices represent the wave of the future for community and clinical psychology. While there has been a major push to implement empirically supported treatments and interventions, little of this research is culturally anchored. Additionally, less of this research incorporates principals of community based participatory research or is designed for dissemination to real world practice. The Disruptive Behaviors Clinic is a university based clinic created with the mission of becoming an Evidence Based Practice paradigm for the families of children and adolescents with Disruptive Behavior Disorders.

The DBC protocol is unique in that while the central services are provided out of a university based setting, the protocol was conceptualized, designed, and implemented in collaboration with four different community based agencies. Indigenous knowledge of community experts (cultural background of clients, daily dynamics, community values and perceptions) and the technical knowledge of university experts (randomization, multivariate analyses, treatment development, and dissemination) were combined to develop this evidence based practice. Both the University based clinic and the community based agencies serve primarily low income, urban, youth whose presentation of symptoms is often commorbid. Additionally, the complexity of symptom presentation is exacerbated by contextual and cultural elements including needs which vastly exceed resources.

The purpose of this research is to investigate the dissemination of an evidence based treatment protocol for Disruptive Behavior Disorders from a university based mental health agency to community based agencies. The DBC has served 100 families at the central cite with plans to disseminate evidence based practice to affiliated community agencies. Currently, data collection at these community agencies is underway. This research will specifically focus on the tension between evidence based practices, research and service provision based on an interactive and contextual model of collaboration.

2006 - International Studies Association Words: 292 words || 
Info
3. Kawato, Yuko. "U.S. Military Bases Abroad and Anti-Base Social Movements: Rationalist and Constructivist Explanations for Base Policy Change" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p98475_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Maintaining military effectiveness through forward deployment is one of the most significant aspects of U.S. strategy to address international security challenges. There are many U.S. military bases abroad, and key policy decisions include base establishment, reduction, and elimination. Determining troop levels and base functions are also important. Furthermore, there are policies on the environment, on military prostitution, and on legal treatment of U.S. soldiers who commit crimes in host states. Which actors create, maintain, and change these policies? When, why, and how do they do so? International relations scholars say that state actors decide what is best for military effectiveness and determine base policies. Alternatively, powerful interest groups that benefit from the military presence may influence base policies. These explanations, however, leave many empirical puzzles unanswered. One must take into account anti-base social movements? efforts in changing base policies. I will explore the interaction between states, pro-base interest groups, and anti-base social movements, to ask if social movements have impact on base policies.To capture the interaction between these actors, I will examine the roles of persuasion and social conformity. Persuasion is a process in which actors? perception of their interests, as well as their preferences, change. Social conformity is an actor?s acceptance of a position due to social rewards and punishment, in the absence of persuasion. Persuasion and social conformity are two social processes that could produce base policy change. I will compare these constructivist explanations with military effectiveness and interest group explanations, which are rationalist explanations. They are rationalist as they assume utility-maximizing actors with fixed interests and preferences, engaging in material cost-benefit calculation and strategic bargaining.I will study the anti-base social movement in Okinawa, Japan, during the 1990s, to see which explanation is best to understand the base policy outcome.

2011 - 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 187 words || 
Info
4. Wils, Annababette., Kim, HyeJin., Chaluda, Ania. and Omoeva, Carina. "Progress-based versus trend-based projections" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p494115_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The 2010 Education For All projections by UNESCO for the poorest countries are target-based, that is, certain goals are assumed to be met by a set year and the model calculates what is necessary in order to achieve those targets – how many pupils need to enter school; how many teachers and classrooms are needed; salary costs, construction costs and so forth. This type of projection is appropriate within the setting of the Education for All goals. Another approach to projections is progress-based, that is, future trends that are rooted in past performance. As a comparative exercise to the EFA projections, the EPDC produced a set of alternative projections for the poorest countries, based on historical change in the rate of pupil entry, improvements in retention, pupil teacher ratios, teacher salary growth etcetera. These alternative scenarios show many countries achieving important EFA goals by 2025, but at lower annual costs. The presentation focuses on these results, but also on the more general question of how to make progress-based projections and when it is more appropriate to use target-versus progress-based assumptions.

2009 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 158 words || 
Info
5. Byrne, James. and Pattavina, April. "Moving Beyond Individual-level Interventions: An Evidence-based Review of the Influence of Community Context and the Effectiveness of Place-Based Reentry Strategies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372182_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: While it is now recognized that we will only have marginal improvement in the success of offender reentry initiatives by focusing exclusively on individual-level change strategies, we actually know remarkably little about (1) how community context actually affects various types of offenders, (2) how we can utilizing knowledge of community context in the new wave of reentry initiatives now being developed with funding available through the Second Chance Act. Utilizing a social ecological framework, we first review the available research on person-environment interactions (focusing on both pre-entry( e.g. incarceration) and reentry( from prison).After presenting this review, we then examine the available research on a wide range of new place- based initiatives, including: concentrated community supervision programs; reentry courts; restorative justice reentry programs; various community notification strategies designed to inform residents about returning offenders( e.g sex offenders, gang members, etc.); place-specific interagency task forces; and other initiatives designed to identify” high risk” offenders and/or to coordinate community-based treatment services.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 1555 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy