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2011 - Seventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 103 words || 
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1. Gale, Ken. "Knowing Me, Knowing You: Becoming Father, Becoming Son in the Fluid Play of Memory, Affect and Intuition" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champain Illini Union, Urbana, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p494628_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The recognition of his deceased father in an old war-time picture sets in play for the writer the undoing of the self through the temporal and fluid re-territorialisation of the space historically delineated, identified and owned by the collective signifier ‘father and son’. Aware of living in and contributing to the crisis of representation and instigated by the event of revelation, the writing attempts to show how this signifier is placed under erasure, how ‘father and son’ becomes other, how previous resistances to reflexivity are challenged and how, through a praxis of differentiation, a delirious freeing of the self is seen to emerge.

2015 - 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 579 words || 
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2. Khurshid, Ayesha. "Becoming Educated, Becoming Self-Disciplined: Women’s Education & The Production Of “Virtuous Agents” In Pakistan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Washington Hilton Hotel, Washington D.C., Mar 08, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p991016_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Becoming Educated, Becoming Self-Disciplined: Women’s Education & The Production Of “Virtuous Agents” In Pakistan

Objectives
International development agencies view education as the main tool to empower Muslim women and to modernize Muslim countries (Abu-Lughod 2009; Kandiyoti 2005). However, recent feminist and development scholarship demonstrate how education produces not only new opportunities but also new regulations for women (Bartlett 2008; North 2013; Robinson-Pant 2003). Through using ethnographic data collected with women teachers from low-income and rural communities in Pakistan, this paper argues that these opportunities and regulations operate through a cultural narrative that presents educated women as self-disciplined subjects. This analysis complicates the narrative of women’s education as universally empowering, and marks a multidimensional shift in gendered ideology at the nexus of local and global influences.

Theoretical Framework
In order to examine how educated women perform a self-disciplined subjectivity to access new opportunities, I employ feminist poststructuralist frameworks (Butler 1999) that theorize gender as a performance, rather than a fixed identity, that is acted out in everyday relationships. This conceptualization helps to understand how being educated implies being able to self-regulate for women from rural communities in Pakistan, and, it is this gendered performance that makes new roles and opportunities accessible to educated women.

Methods
This paper uses ethnographic data collected from 2008 to 2012 with women teachers working for community schools supported by a transnational development organization to provide education to girls from rural and low-income communities in Pakistan. The data includes participant observation conducted in classrooms, parent-teacher meetings, and community meetings and in-depth interviews conducted with thirty-two women teachers. I analyzed this data using deductive codes, such as meaning and purpose of girls’ education, and inductive coding, such as distinction of educated women from uneducated women

Results
The results show that the women participants of this study are validated as “real” educated women through performance of a self-disciplined subjectivity. Educated women, thus, are allowed to do paid work outside of home and gain financial independence but without challenging the role of male figurehead, become assertive but without engaging in verbal or physical fights, become visible in public domain through demonstrating a gendered domesticity, and deal with non-relative men in male-dominated decision making processes through a reserved behavior. Educated women, thus, are allowed to modify certain gender norms while strictly following others. In addition, unlike “uneducated” women, educated women are “trusted” to take up their new roles without an active surveillance from their families and communities.

Significance
In the context where women’s education is perceived as a magic pill to resolve issues ranging from poverty to religious extremism in Muslim countries, this paper complicates the global narrative of women’s education as inherently and universally empowering. It also shows why it is important for educational policymakers to examine the meaning of education and gender empowerment in the complex histories of local sociocultural contexts.

References:

Abu-Lughod, L. 2009. Dialects of women’s empowerment. International Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, 41(1), 83-103.
Barlett, L., 2008. Literacy’s verb. Exploring what literacy is and what literacy does. International Journal of Educational Development, 28 (6), 737-753.
Butler, J., 1999. Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. Rutledge, London, New York.
Kandiyti, D. 2005. The politics of gender and reconstruction in Afghanistan. Occasional Paper 4. Geneva: USRISD.
North, A. 2013. Reading and writing between different worlds: Learning, literacy, and power in the lives of two migrant domestic workers. International Journal of Educational Development, 33, 595-603
Robinson-Pant, A. 2000. Women and literacy: A Nepal perspective. International Journal of Development Education, 20 (4), 349-364.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 4396 words || 
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3. Coba-Rodriguez, Sarai. and Jarrett, Robin. "You Try to become Totally Opposite of Your Parents or You become Just Like Them" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1009315_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: When we better understand how parents conceptualize their own school experiences, it enriches our understanding about parent’s learning-related engagement as they prepare their children for kindergarten entry. Thus, this study explores how low-income, African-American parents’ own school/family experiences shape how and why they are involved in their own child’s education. Preliminary findings derived from qualitative interviews, revealed three categories, demonstrating the variations in childhood experiences and parents own involvement in their child’ education: 1) Non-Active Parents/Family Members and Active Mothers; 2) Active Parents/Family Members and Non-Active Mothers; and 3) Active Parents/Family Members and Active Mothers. All three categories provide a sharper view of how parents’ early childhood experiences shape their own involvement and the possible implications of each experience.

2011 - Seventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 160 words || 
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4. Schadler, Cornelia. "Becoming mother, becoming father: subjects, transformations and the transition to parenthood" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champain Illini Union, Urbana, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p507645_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In my talk I will show outcomes of my multimethod qualitative study about transformations and retraditionalization/rematerialization of traditional gender positions at transition to parenthood. Subjects in transformation can be described by gathering data about the human and nonhuman networks parents engage with. The data was conducted from 2009 to 2010 in Vienna (Austria) by amultimethod ethnographic study that included problem centered interviews with parents, midwives and gynecologists, observations in hospitals, birth lectures and pregnancy and birth related events, analysis of documents like advisory books and bulletin boards, and (re) enactment of certain practices like taking a pregnancy test or heading out for baby shopping. For analysis I used a theoretically guided coding process. Analysis showed how certain interconnections and processes may solidify several figurations of subjects and objects. The human and nonhuman interconnected entities involved created figurations that can be considered as traditional gender positions. Analysis of the involved entities and transformation can describe the process of becoming gendered subjects.

2013 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 12013 words || 
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5. Kachtan, Dana. "White Men can (Become) Black – Whites Acting and Becoming Black" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 10, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p649234_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the processes of acting and becoming Black among White individuals. The research that examines the process of acting and becoming Black focuses on mixed-race and non-white, scrutinizing the ways in which black identity is coerced or chosen or movement from one non-white identity to another. This research adds to existing literature the examination of acting and becoming Black among individuals that are perceived as White. Opposed to the common assumption that movement would be from black to white, this paper argues that the unmarked, white, non-ethnic may choose to acquire a black identity at a certain time and place, and act according to the black, marked ethnic identity. This paper discusses the processes of acting and becoming Black among White individuals in Israeli society. The central ethnic distinction in Israeli society distinguishes between two ethnic identities: Ashkenazi which is similar to White identity and Mizrachi which is similar to Black identity. This research is based on a study conducted in two infantry brigades in the IDF, one perceived as Mizrachi (Black) and the other perceived as Ashkenazi (White). The research focuses on the Mizrachi (Black) brigade, indicating two central practices of acting and becoming Black: linguistic performance and behavioral performance. The paper emphasizes the space-time dependence of the ethnic identity and highlights temporality and locality that stress an extreme ethnic performance, which emphasizes the Black individuals’ Blackness and laying the ground for Whites to act and become Black.

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