Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 7,489 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 1498 - Next  Jump:
2017 - DSI Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
1. Warner, Janis. and Wipawayangkool, Kamphol. "Examining the Influence of Psychological IT Security Climate on IT User Behavioral Intentions Using a Theory of Planned Behavior Framework" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the DSI Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington DC, Nov 18, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1292998_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Understanding users is fundamental to developing effective IT security systems. This study investigates environmental influences on user beliefs and intentions toward an IT security artifact by extending the Theory of Planned Behavior with individual level climate perceptions. Results indicate that climate influences attitudinal beliefs which ultimately influence behavioral intentions.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 9562 words || 
Info
2. Alhabash, Saleem., Baek, Jong-hwan., Cunningham, Carie. and Hagerstrom, Amy. "Anticyberbullying Civic Participation: Effects of Virality, Arousal Level, and Commenting Behavior for YouTube Videos on Civic Behavioral Intentions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p714248_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: An experiment investigated the effects of commenting behavior, virality, and arousal level on anti-cyberbullying civic behavioral intentions. Participants (N = 98) were exposed to YouTube videos related to cyberbullying that varied in terms of arousal level (low vs. high) video virality (low vs. high views), and commenting behavior where they either commented on the video or not after watching it. Findings showed that the three-way interaction among commenting behavior, virality, and arousal level was significant in affecting civic behavioral intentions (CBI). Additionally, viral behavioral intentions (VBI) were the strongest predictors of CBI, with degrees that varied as a function of commenting behavior, virality, arousal level, and the interactions among them. Results are discussed within the framework of the relationship between online engagement and offline civic action.

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
3. Li, Yue. "Rethinking Rationality and Opinion Formation in Legislative Behavior: How Do Daughters Shape the Voting Behavior of Their Legislator Parents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1350913_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Offspring, especially daughters, can influence the voting behavior of their legislator parents on women's issues. However, this effect is conditioned on the gender and ideology of the legislators.

2019 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 9589 words || 
Info
4. Cleve, Moritz. and Li, Zhaoying. "Effects of Reported Hurricane Behaviors and Outcomes on Efficacy, Threat Perceptions and Future Evacuation Behavior" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Canada, Aug 07, 2019 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1556229_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In an experimental setting, evacuation behavior and outcomes affected efficacy beliefs to evacuate or stay home, as well as threat perceptions, and intentions to evacuate during a hypothetical hurricane. Regression and parallel mediation models were proposed, and their implications to include efficacy beliefs about the non-recommended response in the EPPM (Witte, 1992) and risk communications, as well as new measures of prior hurricane experience are discussed.

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 7 pages || Words: 2484 words || 
Info
5. Beveridge, Andrew. and Catsambis, Sophia. "Adolescent At-Risk Behaviors: A Multi-Level Analysis of Family, Neighborhood and School Factors Affecting Adolescent Behavioral Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p107527_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Families, neighborhoods and schools influence a variety of outcomes for adolescents, including academic achievement and various at-risk behaviors (such as, dropping out of school, alcohol use, drug use, use of violence). We use data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study, a large longitudinal survey of eighth graders continuing from 1988 through 2000, combined with US census data at the level of students’ residential zip codes. We simultaneously analyze all aspects of student lives: their families, neighborhoods, and schools.
Our findings suggest that “bringing neighborhood in” makes sense for this line of research. Disadvantages at the neighborhood and school level may place students at risk of educational failure, by influencing their behaviors and academic achievement directly and indirectly. Disadvantaged neighborhoods and schools may directly and indirectly lead to higher levels of at-risk student behaviors, even after controlling for individual and family background variables. Some of these may be mitigated by family practices.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 1498 - Next  Jump:

©2020 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy