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2008 - ASC Annual Meeting Pages: 1 pages || Words: 219 words || 
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1. Russell, Brenda., Ceccherini, Traci. and Kraus, Shane. "Defining Bullying Behaviors in School: An Investigation of Student Perceptions of Relational and Physical Bullying Behaviors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri, Nov 11, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p269918_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Schools across the United States have hastened to implement school-based bullying programs to help prevent bullying behaviors. However, many programs that focus on educating students about bullying often use a “one size fits all” approach, typically gearing toward physical violence, and based on research conducted on boys. This research sought to investigate student perceptions of what behaviors constitute bullying and examined incidence, prevalence, and severity of relational and physical violence among boys and girls in elementary, middle, and high school. The Social Behavior Questionnaire (Galen & Underwood, 1997) was used to assess perceptions of bullying. Frequency of victimization and perpetration of bullying were also investigated. Participants included 205 elementary, middle, and high school students (104 females and 101 males) ranging from 3rd to 10th grade. Results indicate girls were more likely to perceive relational aggression as bullying, and found it more hurtful than boys, whereas boys perceived bullying as predominantly physical aggression. Middle and high school students were less likely to distinguish between relational and physical aggression compared to elementary aged students. In addition, boys experienced relational aggression as often as girls and boys and girls that perpetrate both physical and relational aggression also reported being victims of such aggression.

2013 - MWERA Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 4457 words || 
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2. Jin, Su., Tang, Xiaoxue. and Zhang, Rupzhou. "Proximity, In-class Disruptive Behavior and Evaluation of Teacher’s Behavior: A Study of High School Students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MWERA Annual Meeting, Hilton Orrington Hotel, Evanston, Illinois, Nov 06, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p675559_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research explored the relationship among high school students’ classroom proximity with their teacher, in-class disruptive behaviors and their evaluation of teacher’s behavior. The observed data of students’ disruptive behaviors in a high school American history class was jointly used with the teachers’ behavior and characteristics survey to analyze if there was any proximity effect on students’ in-class disruptive behavior and students’ evaluation of teacher’s behavior. The results showed that there are no student-teacher proximity group differences on students’ in-class disruptive behaviors; however, student-teacher proximity had significant intermediate effects on students’ evaluation of teacher’s behavior. In addition, there was no significant correlation between students’ in-class disruptive behaviors and their evaluation of teacher’s behavior. Gender and observation interval differences on students’ in-class disruptive behaviors were also examined. Possible reasons for such results were discussed.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 7333 words || 
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3. Trepte, Sabine. and Dienlin, Tobias. "Risky Behaviors: How Online Experiences Influence Privacy Behaviors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p714448_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: According to the privacy paradox, people's attitudes on privacy do not have an influence on their behavior on Social Network Sites (SNSs) like Facebook. The authors argue that this finding might be due to methodological reasons: privacy attitudes are a broad concept that was linked to very specific behaviors. In this paper, we thus address the privacy paradox from a different perspective: instead of attitudes, do concrete experiences on SNSs lead to a change in behavior? In a longitudinal study, N = 327 respondents were surveyed. It was found that after negative experiences, users did change their informational privacy behavior and also their risk assessment of potential further negative experiences. Respondents did not change their psychological privacy behavior. A trend towards a change of the social privacy behavior was found.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 1533 words || 
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4. Lapinski, Maria., Kerr, John., Zhao, Jinhua. and Shupp, Robert. "Social Norms, Behavioral Payment Programs, and Behaviors: Toward a Theory of the Role of Financial Incentives in Normative Systems (FINS)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p985232_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Social norms research plays a predominant role in the field of communication, yet questions remain about how and when social norms are influential. Three conceptual issues bear additional scrutiny in order to uncover when social norms impact action and the moderators of this relationship. First, the influence of financial incentives in normative systems remains a relatively unarticulated but potentially important point of theoretical development because there is reason to believe financial incentives might crowd out other sources of motivation. Second, a distinction has been made between perceived and collective social norms but the unique effect of each type of norm has not been well articulated nor tested empirically. Third, previous research has highlighted the important role of group identification in normative systems, but the empirical findings remain mixed. This paper addresses these issues; in particular, this study presents a theoretical model to address these issues and reports the results of a public goods experiment to test the effects of short-term monetary incentives on normative systems and behavior.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 495 words || 
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5. Dmitrieva, Julia., Novak, Jamie. and Espel, Emma. "Important Others’ Involvement in Risky Behavior and Antisocial Behavior among Adjudicated Female Adolescent Offenders" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p959962_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: Social relationships play important role in adolescent development of antisocial behavior. Specifically, research demonstrates that the quality of parent-adolescent relationship and parental sanctions/disapproval of antisocial behavior predict lower antisocial behavior (Jessor, 1991; Meeus et al., 2004). Similarly, emerging research on romantic relationships demonstrates that the relationship quality and romantic partner sanctions/disapproval of antisocial behavior are also important factors explaining youth involvement in antisocial behavior (Monahan et al., 2014). Finally, having an important nonparental adult (e.g., extended family member, coach, or a neighbor) has been shown to be associated with lower levels of problem behavior (Greenberger et al., 1998; Zimmerman et al., 2002).

Less in known about the impact of these social network members’ risky behavior on youth antisocial behavior. To be sure, there is well established literature on the impact of parental criminal behavior on youth externalizing problems (e.g., Besemer, 2012), as well as on the impact of romantic partner antisocial behavior on youth behavior (e.g., Simmons, et al., 2002; Haynie et al., 2005). However, it is not clear how the effects of relationship warmth, sanctions of antisocial behavior, and social network member involvement in risky behavior together influence youth antisocial behavior. For example, are parental sanctions of antisocial behavior less effective if parents themselves are involved in many risky behaviors because youth perceive them as hypocritical? Or, in contrast, are parental sanctions more effective when parents themselves have engaged in risky behavior? The current study investigated how warmth, sanctions, and important others’ risky behavior together contribute to youth antisocial behavior and drug use in a sample of adjudicated female adolescent offenders.

Method
Participants were 90 female adolescent offenders (ages 13-24), either confined in a secure juvenile facility or serving a probationary sentence. Participants came from divers but disadvantaged backgrounds (20% African American, 29% Hispanic, average parental education at 11th grade). In-person interviews included information about youth lifetime history of Antisocial Behavior and Drug Use, the degree of Warmth and Sanctions of Antisocial Behavior in the mother-daughter, father-daughter, romantic partner, and important non-parental adult relationships, and reports of these important others’ engagement in Risky Behavior (such as driving under the influence and drug use).

Results
A series of path models examined the effect of warmth, sanctions, risky behavior, and their interactions on youth substance use and antisocial behavior within each relationship domain. Important others’ engagement in risky behavior interacted with warmth and sanctions, such that higher maternal sanctions of antisocial behavior were associated with lower youth antisocial behavior only among youth whose mothers had high involvement in risky behavior (Figure 1). This seem to indicate that delinquent girls might only respond to maternal sanctions if their mothers have first-hand understanding of what it means to be engaged in antisocial behavior and, perhaps, are more skilled at enforcing sanctions. Similar results were observed for romantic partners. Furthermore, paternal risky behavior was associated with higher levels of substance use only among girls whose fathers also exhibited high levels of warmth (Figure2). Discussion will explore implications for theory development and interventions.

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