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2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8889 words || 
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1. Hull, Shawnika. and Hong, Yangsun. "The Influence of Viewers’ Perceived Risk, Regulatory Focus, Behavior Inhibition/Activation System on the Persuasiveness of Framed HIV Test Promotion Messages" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p641665_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The present study aims to test the interaction of 3 different, but theoretically similar indicators of motivational orientation - perceived risk, behavioral inhibition/activation, regulatory focus - with gain- and loss- framed HIV test promotion message. We expect that message frame interacts with the motivational orientation to enhance behavioral intention with respect to HIV testing, and that the interaction is mediated through elaboration. This study compares the patterns in which each personality characteristic interacts with message frame in order to identify patterns in message effects. We suggest that there may be similar underlying mechanisms among those three personality traits that produce interactive effects with message frame on intention. However, our hypotheses were not supported. It appears that each of the variables has a somewhat different relationship with intentions to seek testing in these data. The relationship between perceived risk, message frame and intentions was not consistent with the relationship between regulatory focus, message frame, and intentions and the relationship between BIS/BAS, message frame, and intentions. Although our hypotheses were not supported by these data, we found that perceived risk, regulatory focus and BIS/BAS may be important segmentation variables for targeting HIV-test promotion messages.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 73 words || 
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2. Moon, Byongook. "The Effect of Bullying Victimization on Delinquent Behaviors: Focusing on Duration and Timing of Victimization" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 18, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1032444_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Numerous empirical studies have been conducted to examine prevalence of school bullying and negative consequences on victims of school bullying. However, relatively limited studies examined the effects of duration and timing of bullying victimization on delinquent and bullying behaviors. The current study with a longitudinal sample of approximately 600 Korean adolescents examines the effects of bullying victimization, especially focusing on duration and timing of victimization, on subsequent delinquent and bullying behaviors.

2015 - National Council for Black Studies (NCBS) 39TH Annual Conference Words: 270 words || 
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3. Bishop, Nadielka. "Doctoral Students’ Mentoring Experiences and Their Perceptions of the Impact on Research Behaviors: A Focus on Historically Black Colleges and Universities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Council for Black Studies (NCBS) 39TH Annual Conference, The Westin Los Angeles Airport Hotel, Los Angeles, California, Mar 11, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1000249_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Studies report that mentoring has a positive correlation with research development of doctoral students in higher education. Ten percent of Black doctoral degree recipients receive their education at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Therefore, research mentoring at HBCUs should be examined. Understanding these environments can ensure diversity in higher education mentoring, tenured faculty positions, and research funding opportunities. This qualitative case study seeks to collect the research mentoring experiences reported by doctoral students at two HBCUs in the state of North Carolina and to report their perceptions of these experiences for characteristics relative to ten elements of Research Training Environment (RTE) Theory. One-on-one interviews and cluster/focus groups were used to allow participants from HBCUs in the state of North Carolina to share the perceptions of mentoring during their doctoral matriculation and whether or not they believe their experiences have had an impact on their research attitudes and abilities. Codes were created based on the characteristics of RTE theory. Nine of the ten characteristics emerged from the data collected. Member checking was utilized after analysis. Analysis was done using Atlas.ti software. Interviews were transcribed and coded for emerging themes. Dominant outcomes from the conversations included mentee responsibility, anxiety and frustration about research, peer support and collaboration, a division of responsibility and opportunities, and reference to research as a guided journey. Future implications from this research include training faculty mentors to engage students in research efforts and to follow up on their efforts, implementing strategies that stress the importance of scholarship and industry, and enforcing or reinforcing collaborative research efforts among the doctoral student population.

2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 15 pages || Words: 5190 words || 
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4. Brubaker, Cathryn. "Gender-role Orientation, Family Structure and Health Behavior: A Focus on Physical Activity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p183373_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: It is theorized that men who embrace traditional masculine ideals tend to deny the body’s vulnerability, take health risks, and with the exception of physical activity generally disregard healthy self-care habits. Conversely, though embracing traditional feminine ideals is assumed to be largely protective of women’s health, it also may be lessen engagement in exercise and other heart-healthy physical activity.
I investigated how three dimensions of gender-role orientation – gender-role attitudes, gender-role personality and gendered behavior – were related to engagement in physical activity, controlling for family structure and socio-demographic factors known to be associated with health. In addition, the main effects of family structure (marital status, parenthood status and caregiver status) on physical activity were examined, as well as how they interacted with gender-role orientation in predicting physical activity. The role of family structure, and in particular its interactions with gender-role orientation, yielded some unexpected results. The findings will be discussed.

2017 - Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action Words: 294 words || 
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5. Mak, Winnie., Tong, Alan., Fu, Amanda. and Watkins, Edward. "Efficacy of Internet-based mindfulness-based training and rumination-focused cognitive behavioral therapy in preventing depression and anxiety" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Jun 21, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1238713_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: To reduce the incidence and societal burden of depression and anxiety, the development of community-based, transdiagnostic, selective prevention for individuals who are at risk due to their ruminative and worrying tendencies is crucial for community mental health. The ubiquity of mobile technology provides an opportunity to prevent mental illness within the reach of users’ hands. The present study tested the efficacy of two Internet-based prevention programs using randomised controlled trial in reducing depression and anxiety symptoms and preventing the incidence of diagnoses who are at risk due to their high levels of rumination and worry. The programs used the guided self-help approach to teach individuals to apply learned strategies in their daily lives. 120 participants (mean age = 32) recruited from social media were randomly assigned to one of the following conditions: (1) rumination-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (RFCBT), (2) mindfulness-based training (MBT), and (3) psychoeducation placebo control. Participants completed the Internet-based program over a 6-week period, with weekly updates of topics and guided exercises. A personal coach was assigned to each participant to guide them through the homework assignments over emails throughout the training. Findings from linear mixed model analyses showed that participants in both RFCBT and MBT groups improved in their depression and anxiety symptoms and reduction in rumination and worry. Specifically, the effect of RFCBT was mediated by behavioral activation while the effect of MBT was mediated by mindfulness. Results demonstrated the efficacy of Internet-based guided programs in the prevention of common mental disorders in the Chinese community. Such approach is highly scalable and provides a convenient, highly accessible option for the public to prevent the incidence of common mental disorders in Hong Kong, where public mental health services and providers are scarce and mental illness stigma is strong in the community.

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