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2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 31 words || 
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1. Archbell, Kristen., Li, Yan. and Coplan, Robert. "“Book Based Beliefs” to “Experience Based Beliefs”: Chinese Pre-service and In-service Teacher Beliefs about Child Misbehaviors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p955154_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Teachers’ beliefs are built on a foundation of professional development acquired during their Bachelor of Education, along with experience in the classroom environment (Farmer et al., 2011). Pre-service teachers’ beliefs are not necessarily based on classroom exposure, but rooted in their post-secondary education (Rimm-Kaufman et al., 2006). Thus, pre-service teacher beliefs may provide insight into the knowledge obtained through Bachelor of Education programs (O’Haver, 2011), and may be primarily booked based. It has been suggested that at the in-service level of teaching compared to the pre-service level, teachers’ beliefs are relatively stable, as they are built not only on pre-service learning, but a significant amount of experience and exposure to the classroom (Fang, 1996; Varuli, 1999; Rimm-Kaufman et al., 2006). Teacher beliefs have both direct and indirect effects on child outcomes at school (Fang, 1996), and therefore are important to examine. However, to date there have been few studies directly comparing the beliefs of pre-service and in-service teachers – and no such studies have been conducted in non-Western Cultures. Due to values in Chinese culture (e.g., self control) it is expected that Chinese teachers would hold negative views towards misbehaviors. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to examine the differences between pre-service and in-service Chinese kindergarten teachers towards children’s classroom misbehaviors.
Participants from this study were N=826 (22.5% pre-service, 77.5% in-service) kindergarten teachers from Shanghai, P.R. China. Teachers responded to a series of child vignettes depicting children engaging in various forms of classroom misbehaviors (physical aggression, relational aggression, rough play). Following each vignette, teachers’ indicated their behavioral responses (e.g., intervene), emotional reactions (e.g., anger), perceived implications for each child (social, academic), and their own self-efficacy.
Results from a series of mixed repeated measures ANOVA indicated a number of significant differences among pre- and in-service teachers. For example, pre-service teachers reported feeling less prepared to effectively handle child misbehaviors in the classroom as compared to in-service teachers (see Figure 1). Further, pre-service teachers reported that they would be less likely to intervene and would have greater tolerance towards misbehaviors. Some differences emerged that were specific to the form of child misbehavior. For example, in-service teachers appeared to tolerate more, intervene less, and perceived less implications towards relational aggression than pre-service teachers. Other differences in pre-service and in-service teacher beliefs also arose as a function of gender. For example, in-service teachers were more likely to tolerate misbehaviors among depictions of boys compared to girls (see Figure 2). Further, pre-service teachers felt more prepared to effectively handle girl compared to boy misbehaviors. Findings are in support of additional professional development needed at both pre-service and in-service level of teaching. This is essential, as it has been found that in China teachers may disgrace misbehaving students, which may lead to further problems (Chen, French, & Schneider, 2006). Results will be discussed in terms of teaching implications, and professional development, and future directions.

2016 - Association of Teacher Educators Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Johnston, Elisabeth. and Ward, Elilzabeth. "Preliminary data from a validation study of the Elementary Teacher Efficacy Beliefs Instrument-Math (ETEBI-M) and the Elementary Teacher Efficacy Beliefs Instrument-Science (ETEBI-S)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association of Teacher Educators Annual Meeting, Chicago Hilton, Chicago, IL, Feb 11, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1050518_index.html>
Publication Type: Single Paper Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The presenters will share preliminary data from a validation study of the ETEBI-M and ETEBI-S. After reviewing the data, the participants will share suggestions of ways to continue the analysis.

2017 - Association of Teacher Educators Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Johnston, Elisabeth. and Ward, Elizabeth. "Findings from the Validation Study of the Elementary Teacher Efficacy Beliefs Instrument-Math (ETEBI-M) and the Elementary Teacher Efficacy Beliefs Instrument-Science (ETEBI-S)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association of Teacher Educators, Orlando Caribe Royale, Orlando, Florida, Feb 10, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1168965_index.html>
Publication Type: Multiple Paper Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The presenters will share the findings from a validation study of the ETEBI-M and ETEBI-S. Participants will consider implications of these results for teacher preparation programs and professional development providers.

2017 - The 13th International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 149 words || 
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4. Gilewski, Casey. "Preservice Teachers’ Beliefs: An Examination of How Educational Experiences Shape Beliefs about Teaching and Learning" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 13th International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 17, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1241696_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Undergraduate teacher preparation programs have had an increase in non-traditional preservice teacher (PST) enrollment which has resulted in a unique and diverse classroom environment of various ages, expericences, and beliefs about teaching and learning that needs to be accounted for as faculty teach course content, methods, and theories (Andres & Carpenter, 1997; Cochran-Smith & Zeichner, 2010; Dill & Henely, 1998; Ely, 1999 Henke, et. al., 1997; Justice & Dornan, 2001). However, the current literature on beliefs and experiences is lacking in terms of college entry status (CES) and how statuses can impact PSTs’ beliefs and teacher preparation programs (Beijaard, Verloop, & Vermunt, 2000; Collins, Selinger, & Pratt, 2003; Erkmen, 2012; Feiman-Nemser, 2001; Löfström & Poom-Valickis, 2013; Ng et al., 2010; Tabachnick & Zeichner, 1984). Therefore, this narrative inquiry study examined differing CES of elementary PSTs and how their status and experience have impacted their beliefs about teaching and learning.

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