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Showing 1 through 5 of 21 records.
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2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 45 pages || Words: 10028 words || 
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1. Smith, Herman. "Guilty Americans and Shameful Japanese? An Affect Control Test of Benedict’s Thesis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p108503_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many scholars accept Ruth Benedict’s concept of Japan as a shame-based society and the United States as a distinctly guilt-based one, as argued in her highly cited work, The Chrysanthemum and the Sword. More recent empirical studies suggest that this clear demarcation between shame- and guilt-based societies is not necessarily the case today. We perform an exegesis of her work, and summarize it into an ideal typology of guilt and shame-based societies. We use this typological summary to set up a testable set of falsifiable predictions. The affect control theory model simulator, JavaInteract, provides a mechanism for rigorously sorting out the kinds of role-identities, behaviors, settings, and events that actually lead to feelings of shame and guilt in each culture. The fundamental principles underlying affect control theory suggest much more complex causation of displays of guilt and shame than Benedict or more recent researchers indicate, but our results are consistent with the growing, empirical cross-cultural literature suggesting the power of collectivistic Asian and individualistic Western norms for leading to different emotional displays and event outcomes. We demonstrate that Japanese emotion norms lead to very different interactional outcomes than for Americans. Japanese emotion norms are stratified by sex and age, leading to very different emotional work compared to Americans when the emotion norms are breeched in ways not anticipated by Benedict.

2008 - MPSA Annual National Conference Pages: 16 pages || Words: 4869 words || 
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2. deTar, Matthew. "The Specters of Economic Determinism in Benedict Anderson" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual National Conference, Palmer House Hotel, Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 03, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p265795_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Tracing two broad assumptions within Anderson’s Imagined Communities, the essay argues that the form of the nation is inadequate to contemporary politics, and the transference of this form across societies rests on an erasure of cultural difference.

2010 - Southern Political Science Association Words: 214 words || 
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3. Gorman, Ryan. "The Concept of Progress in Pope Benedict XVI’s Caritas in Veritate" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Crowne Plaza Hotel Ravinia, Atlanta, Georgia, Jan 06, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p396659_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores Pope Benedict’s theory of progress as articulated in his recent encyclical Caritas in Veritate. The Benedictine notion of progress is distinctive in that it attempts to synthesize a classical understanding of political phenomena with the revealed teachings of the Christian faith, while at the same time attempting to reconcile pre-modern and modern conceptions of man and society. Thus, at times the encyclical appears to be a convoluted mixture of opposing ideas, as attested to by the diverse reactions immediately following its release. However, the document does offer a cohesive vision of human progress if one reads it attentively. The key element in understanding Benedict’s concept of progress is summed-up in the phrase “integral human development,” which is discussed at length in the encyclical. For Pope Benedict, progress does not mean mere technological innovation or economic growth, and it cannot be taken for granted; rather, progress is contingent upon human beings freely choosing to live and act responsibly with regard to the moral conduct of one’s own life, as well as in one’s social interactions with fellow human beings. Only Christian humanism, Benedict concludes, offers a satisfactory account of man’s nature and his social obligations, and only with faith in God is authentic human progress possible.

2013 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 7765 words || 
Info
4. Moore, Rick. "Having the last word, but losing the culture wars: Mainstream press coverage of a canceled evangelical benediction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC, Aug 08, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p670547_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines how mainstream news media reported the withdrawal of a popular pastor from the 2013 Obama inaugural ceremony. Louie Giglio was originally chosen for a role in the event, but withdrew when focus was placed on a sermon he once delivered about homosexuality. Analysis of framing and sourcing of the stories raises serious questions about the role media played in reporting about this skirmish, which is clearly part of the larger culture wars.

2007 - NCA 93rd Annual Convention Pages: 37 pages || Words: 9226 words || 
Info
5. Valenzano, Joseph. and Menegatos, Lisa. "Benedict the Bifurcated: Secular and Sacred Framing of the Pope and Turkey" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 93rd Annual Convention, TBA, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p192562_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Pope Benedict XVI's comments at Regensburg regarding the relationship between Islam, faith, reason and violence and his ensuing trip to Turkey provided a unique moment where a newspaper played an active role in the framing of secular and sacred dimensions of both the papcy and Turkish National identity. Specifically, we contend that media, specifically the Turkish Daily News, helped manage those tensions. To make our case we begin with a discussion of framing and religion to better explain our method of analysis. We then dissect the coverage of the Pope’s statement and subsequent visit to Turkey and discuss three ways in which The Turkish Daily News, the largest English language daily newspaper in Turkey, portrayed the secular and sacred dimensions of the pope and his visit. We then offer some conclusions about what this means for framing as an analytical tool, the relationship between religion and politics and the impact of this case on contemporary affairs.

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