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2017 - ARNOVA's 46th Annual Conference Words: 103 words || 
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1. Cordery, Carolyn. and Sim, Dalice. "The Functions and Finances of Mutual-Benefit and Public-Benefit Entities: are Different Regulatory Stances Appropriate?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ARNOVA's 46th Annual Conference, Amway Grand Plaza Hotel, Grand Rapids, Michigan, Nov 14, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1283018_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The majority of the nonprofit sector comprises membership-based entities. While a number of these are charities (public-benefit entities), a significant number are mutual-benefit entities, established to serve members rather than the public in general. Although mutual-benefit entities enjoy some of the same taxation benefits as public-benefit entities, the regulatory approach has been called ‘hodge-podge’ and needing further work to be useful (Hansmann, 1986). This paper seeks to spark debate on ideal levels of regulation in mutual-benefit entities compared to their public-benefit entity counterparts by analysing data sampled from each population, the views of ten interviewees and submissions to regulatory reform.

2012 - ARNOVA Annual Conference Words: 104 words || 
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2. Gugerty, Mary Kay., Masuda, Yuta. and Prakash, Aseem. "The Benefits of Virtue: Are There Benefits to Joining Voluntary Regulation Programs?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ARNOVA Annual Conference, Hyatt Regency Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN, Nov 14, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p583906_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The number of nonprofit accountability and standard-setting programs has increased dramatically. Such programs include codes of conduct, accreditation and certification programs, and programs of voluntary standards. In spite of this prevalence, little evidence exists to assess which nonprofits join these programs and why. We address that gap by examining the decision to join the regional BBB Wise-Giving Alliance in Alaska, Oregon, and Western Washington. 800 public charities out of approximately 40,000 in the region have joined or attempted to join the CRP. We model the decision to join using both a standard and a rare events logit model and compare results for robustness.

2019 - Asia Pacific ACR Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Mahadevan, Dhrithi. "Will “I” pay more for “Our” benefit? Premium-Benefit Trade-offs in Consumers’ Green Purchase" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Asia Pacific ACR Conference, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, Ahmedabad, India, Jan 10, 2019 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1448076_index.html>
Publication Type: Working Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study found that consumers’ willingness to pay a lower price premium for green products is greater for products having other benefit appeals. However, when the premium is high, willingness to pay is greater for products having self-benefit appeals. Consumers’ perceived benefits acted as the psychological mechanism explaining this effect.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 6058 words || 
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4. Henderson, Kathryn. "Which Benefits Really Benefit? The Impact of Workplace Policies on the Employment of New Mothers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p104863_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Existing studies on maternal employment following childbirth identify the significant effects of human capital, family structure, and employment characteristics. However, few studies examine the relationship between access to family friendly workplace policies and women’s employment behaviors. Using data from two cohorts of women from the National Longitudinal Survey, this analysis evaluates the impact of access to a wide range of workplace benefits on new mothers’ employment decisions in order to determine whether some policies are more effective at retaining women in the labor force following childbirth. Results indicate that the number and type of fringe benefits play an important role in women’s employment behaviors following childbirth. However, family friendly policies, such as maternity leave and flexible hours, are less important than medical insurance and financial benefits. Access to medical insurance impacts both the likelihood of working after childbirth and also, among employed women, the likelihood of working full-time. Furthermore, in all the specifications of the model, access to medical insurance proves to be a better indicator of employment following childbirth than any other single benefit or any other operationalization of benefits. Policy implications are discussed.

2008 - UCEA Annual Convention Words: 297 words || 
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5. Daniel, Philip. "“Some Benefit” or “Maximum Benefit”: Does the No Child Left Behind Act Render Greater Educational Entitlement to Students with Disabilities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Buena Vista Palace Hotel and Spa, Orlando, Florida, <Not Available>. 2019-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p274465_index.html>
Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: Today the Rowley decision is still the centerpiece of IDEIA and its protection of the education rights of students with special needs. The concept of FAPE, however, carries a more academic-centered meaning involving substantive requirements that address the central core of what students know and should be able to do. This involves administering the same achievement tests to students with special needs as those without such needs. Not all state education agencies or local education agencies have adapted well to these changes. Even today interpretations of the standards-based movement as legislated in NCLB and IDEIA yield the conclusion that accountability does not necessarily translate into providing special needs students with an education that enables them to maximize their potential. This presentation will explore the import of Rowley and the impact of the NCLB and IDEIA on the concept of “some benefit.” Integrated in the analysis will be interpretations of FAPE where the existing case law can be used to divide states promoting: 1) meaningful benefit [Polk]; some or adequate benefit [School Board]; a mixed benefit [Alex R.]; or 4) new decisions emphasizing maximum benefit.[Ottawa] The paper will also discuss a very recent executive decision of the Office of Civil Rights declaring that school personnel school may not deny the participation of a qualified disabled student in an accelerated class or program (and must supply needed aids and services) and may not condition enrollment in an accelerated class or program on the forfeiture of special education or related aids and services.[United States] The capstone of the presentation will be an explication of the legislation, regulations, and case law explaining why school personnel and the colleges and universities involved in licensure programs should seriously consider incorporating high academic standards into programs for special needs students.

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