Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 1,845 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 369 - Next  Jump:
2017 - 88th Annual SPSA Conference Words: 121 words || 
Info
1. Yair, Omer. "Biased Reaction to Political Bias: Disfavorable Bias is Deplorable, Favorable Bias is Negligible" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 88th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, Jan 11, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1172669_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Accusations of political bias are common in many countries. Still, research concerning people's reaction to political bias and their evaluation of its seriousness is lacking. In this paper we ask whether partisans from rival sides react similarly to a political bias that both sides agree (dis)favors one of the groups. Following literatures from both social psychology and political science, we hypothesize that rival partisans would react differently to such a bias, with partisans from the group which suffers from the bias evaluating it as much more serious and objectionable than partisans from the group which gains from that bias. In three separate studies, conducted in two countries, we substantiate our theoretical expectation. We conclude with the possible implications of these findings.

2010 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 214 words || 
Info
2. Nunnally, Shayla. "Mass Perceptions of Media Bias in the 2008 Presidential Election: Gender Bias, Racial Bias, or Fair Game?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA, Nov 11, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p439413_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Much has been discussed about the role of race and gender in the 2008 presidential primaries and general election. Pundits seemed more attuned to the role that race and gender might play in the level of support that either Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama might receive as candidates associated with two underrepresented groups (gender group and racial group, respectively) as viable candidates in the presidential election. Media have an important role in framing political issues and coverage of elections and shaping the images of political candidates. Of special interest is how the American public views the role of media in shaping the imagery of candidates through their coverage. In particular, did the American public perceive that Clinton or Obama were treated differently or similarly by the media because of their status as members of underrepresented groups in American politics? This paper uses data from the national survey, 2008 Cooperative Congressional Election Study, to explore mass perceptions of racial and gender bias in the 2008 presidential election coverage of the Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama presidential candidacies. The paper seeks to identify determinants of racial and gender bias in media coverage, with implications for the perceptions of the role of gender and race in the depiction of presidential candidates.

2017 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 5605 words || 
Info
3. Perryman, Mallory., Foley, Jordan. and Wagner, MIchael. "Is Bad News Biased? How Poll Reporting Affects Perceptions of Media Bias and Presumed Behavior" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1282707_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Battleground state polls are a prominent part of U.S. election news coverage. In this experimental study (N=863), we tested how polling results impact how partisans evaluate the news stories through which the polls are reported. Partisans tended to see the articles as biased against their candidate; perceived bias was amplified when their candidate trailed in the poll. Additionally, we found that perceived effects of the articles on others’ behavior differed for ingroup and outgroup members.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 9554 words || 
Info
4. Manohar, Uttara. and Appiah, Osei. "Revisiting the International TA Problem: Acknowledging Intergroup Biases and Testing the Effectiveness of Perspective-Taking in Reducing Biases" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p986193_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: International teaching assistants (TAs) continue to be negatively evaluated by American undergraduate students. Countering the conventional framing of this issue as a matter of language incompatibility, an intergroup communication approach is proposed to investigate this phenomenon through two experiments. In the first experiment, American undergraduate students (N=90) evaluated three international TAs based on photographs alone and indicated a preference for the European TA over Asian TAs. A second experiment using video recorded narratives of the same international TAs found that a perspective taking intervention was able to eliminate the impact of the international TAs’ ethnicity on undergraduate students’ (N=125) evaluation of the TAs. Also, male students who engaged in imagine-target type of perspective taking had the most favorable attitudes towards the TAs, and were most willing to be supportive of all international TAs as compared to male students who engaged in imagine-self perspective taking or those in the control group. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed in the light of social identity theory.

2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
5. Kim, Minchul., Cao, Xiaoxia. and Grabe, Maria. "Assessing News Bias in the Age of a Polarized Media Environment: How Pre-Existing Skepticism Toward a Partisan News Outlet Affects Perceived News Bias" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1355834_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study investigates how people identifying with a political party assess news bias in a polarized news media environment. We conducted an online experiment with a between-subjects design. Participants (N = 228) read the same news story, but were told that the news was from an either pro-Republican, neutral, or pro-Democrat news outlet. We found that attributing a news story to a news outlet aligned with an opposing party influenced the perception of news bias, irrespective of the leaning of the story. More importantly, partisans perceived the news to be biased only if they had pre-existing skepticism toward the news outlet. Our findings suggest that cross-cutting exposure (i.e. consuming news from outlets aligned with an opposing party) may not produce desirable outcomes because pre-existing skepticism towards an out-group news outlet can undermine the perceived credibility of the news produced by the outlet.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 369 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy